Sudan Hotels

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  • Lisala profile photo Lisala
  • Reviews: 18

5 out of 5 starsUser Rating

Assaha Lebanese Traditional Village: Beautiful Hotel

A rather new hotel under lebanese management. Very charming, the rooms are decorated lovingly, with all kinds of amenities like minibar, flatscreen TV. An electric kettle is provided, some tea, coffee, mineralwater are for free. If you miss anything - the very friendly staff is trying hard to help you.

Last November, some parts of the village (like the pool) were still under construction, means in some rooms it was quite noisy, so when you're sensitive on that make sure that the works are really finished. Or ask for another room - when I was there, it was no problem to move to another, quiet one.
Note: The Website below-mentioned is for all the Assahas, means also for Beirut and Doha.

The architecture is awesome. But don't expect great views, for the village is surrounded by walls.

There's a fine lebanese restaurant. But don't go there if you're in a hurry, it is highly frequented, not only by hotel guests, so the service needs his time.

One advantage of this hotel: I didn't saw one cockroach. I was told they are popular in other Khartoum hotels, even in the 5 Star ones.

  • Opinion of Price: more expensive than average
  • Written March 25, 2008
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  • PhoebeCameron profile photo PhoebeCameron
  • Reviews: 1

5 out of 5 starsUser Rating

Logali House: Juba's ONLY Hotel

This is the only hotel i would recommend in Juba. Historically, I have stayed in some of the tented camps on the river, where I have had to pay up to $ 150 a night for the luxury of living in a basic tent and sharing an ablution block with a number of individuals.....The camps were fine and continue to meet a need - but now .....my needs really have been met and any Juba expectations surpassed.
I am here for 10 months out of each year and now am permanently staying at a small guest house (or boutique hotel...if one can imagine that they exist in Juba). It is the home that has been beautifully restored and renovated. It only has 14 rooms (i think they could do with a few more...) the rooms of beautifully finished, have Air Con and you have your own en-suite bathroom with hot running water.....They have a small restaurant and bar - with wonderful service and warm and welcoming staff who make you feel like you have come home.....which when one is far away from home - is probably it's best appeal, pricey but worth it ....my long term agreement is at $ 195 per night.....B&B...and am very happy to pay the extra for some space, sanity a bricks and mortar bedroom and bathroom all to myself!

5 minutes from airport - near Joint Donor office
A real building, old house, with farm house style restaurant and informal bar
Hot Water
Air Con everywhere.......great after running around Juba town all day
Friendly, warm and welcoming staff - who will do all they can to meet your needs
Apparantly there is a pool coming and even rumours of a gym!

  • Opinion of Price: more expensive than average
  • Related to: Business Travel, Adventure Travel, Work Abroad
  • Written November 28, 2007
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This is my room!

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  • mattyelk profile photo mattyelk
  • Reviews: 4

4 out of 5 starsUser Rating

2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

The Blue Nile Sailing Club: Khartoum's best and cheapest place to sleep.

This is a beautiful location to camp at a very minimal price. If you have a camper, or simply a tent, you are welcomed here. There is a little covered cafe for people to sit and read, and enjoy the beautiful view. At night, they will often bring out a television to watch movies on. There are bathrooms facilities and a place to take a shower.

Great location!

  • Opinion of Price: less expensive than average
  • Related to: Budget Travel, Sailing and Boating, Camping
  • Written June 15, 2007

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  • kucha profile photo kucha
  • Reviews: 671

2 out of 5 starsUser Rating

Khartoum Hilton: But if you must...

This was just adequate. The food was only fair. The electricity went on and off throughout the stay. and it took three room changes to get a room where the air conditioning worked a little bit. The staff was indifferent, at best. That said, it is one of the better places to choose in Khartoum due to the central location, views of the river and general feeling of safety.

There is a pool, which some might consider essential given the heat of this city. The rooms all seem to have views of the Nile, which can be quite striking at a dusty sunset.

  • Opinion of Price: more expensive than average
  • Written November 2, 2005
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The Hilton


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  • frockland profile photo frockland
  • Reviews: 585

3 out of 5 starsUser Rating

2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

Nile Hotel: Accommodation in Wadi Halfa

Wadi Halfa will be for many travellers the first place to stay in Sudan. Accommodation in the village is basic. Best option is Nile Hotel, where a bed is 700 SDD. Toilets are simple and the showers are bucket showers.

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Related to: Eco-Tourism, Backpacking, Road Trip
  • Written March 23, 2005
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Room in Nile Hotel


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  • frockland profile photo frockland
  • Reviews: 585

3 out of 5 starsUser Rating

3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

Blue Nile Sailing Club: Accommodation in Khartoum

One of the budget places to stay in Khartoum is the Blue Nile Sailing Club on Sharia el Nil. The place has a friendly atmosphere in a great location direct on the banks of the Blue Nile. Kitcheners old gun boat the “Melik” is used as an office but its also possible to sleep on the dusty upper deck or pitch up a tent on the grass field. Tea and soft drinks are served. The area is secure with a watched parking yard. The price is 3 US $ per night. Day visits cost the same. If you need any advice or assistance ask William the site manager

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Related to: Road Trip, Eco-Tourism, Backpacking
  • Written March 23, 2005
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Kitchener��s gunboat "Melik"


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  • frockland profile photo frockland
  • Reviews: 585

3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

Accommodation: General Information about Accomodation



Sudan is not a destination where many tourists travel to but as long as high standards are not expected its possible to find a place where ever you get stranded. There are so called Locandas in every village. The rooms are simple and often beds are taken out of them into the court yard due to the heat. Toilets and showers are “basic”. It can happen that women are not welcome. Locandas are the cheapest places to stay.

Hotels can be find in bigger cities and more expensive. Often there is no big difference between a locanda and a cheap hotel. Showers and toilets can be very basic.

Campsites are not existing.Its possible to pitch up a tent in the Khartoum at the Blue Nile Sailing Club.

Hospitality is overwhelming in Sudan. In many villages there is a house built for guests who come for a visit. Its very likely that in remote areas invitations will be offered to fellow travellers or visitors.

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Related to: Eco-Tourism, Backpacking
  • Written March 22, 2005
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Hotel Yugoslavia in Wad Medani


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  • grets profile photo grets
  • Reviews: 3429

5 out of 5 starsUser Rating

4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

In the desrt: Sleeping under the stars

Travelling by camel caravan through the desert, there are no campgrounds where you can stop for the night. You just find yourself a suitable place, maybe with a few trees around, or a rock or two for use as the "facilities".

Roll out your mattress on a nice flat ground, get your sleeping bag out as the temperature can drop cinsiderably after the sun goes down, and just chill!

Sleeping under the stars is just amazing, especially in a place like the Sudanese deserts where there is no light pollution to detract from the incredible hugeness of the sky. You can really see thousands of stars as you gaze up at the heavens above you. There are only a handful of other places in the world where I have experienced such a wonderfully clear, starry night!

One night I heard a desert cat miaowing, although I could not see it. We were far too far away from any village for it to be a domesticated cat.

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Related to: Adventure Travel
  • Written November 23, 2004
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Sleeping under the stars


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  • grets profile photo grets
  • Reviews: 3429

5 out of 5 starsUser Rating

4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

Acropole Hotel: A home from home

Proprietor George Pagoulatos is one of the most personable gentlemen you could ever meet. He will make sure that your stay in this hotel is as comfortable as it can be, from start to finish. If you need anything whatsoever, ask George and he will try and arrange it for you. Need to change your airline reservations? No problem. Need a car and driver for an excursion? No problem. Need some medicines? No problem.

Acropole is th eoldest hotel in Khartoum, opened in 1952. From its original main building of 10 rooms, the hotel has now an annexe with 40 more rooms.

In 1988 a terrorist attack blew off the main building killing seven people.

Large airconditioned rooms, many with attached balconies. Most rooms have en suite facilities, those who do, are located within close proximity to large communal bathrooms.

Internet access in the lobby, charged at approx. $4 per hour. The connection is surprisingly fast.

English language newspapers are available, albeit that some papers are a few days out of date.

News from teh internet printed off daily.

Large notice board with local information.

Small shop with post cards, maps and stamps.

Safety deposit facilities available.

Room rates include breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Laundry service. PLease note, they do not accept ladies underwear.

Library with large selection of books.

  • Opinion of Price: about average
  • Written November 23, 2004
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Acropole Hotel


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  • mafi_moya profile photo mafi_moya
  • Reviews: 482

3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

Just turn up!

Sudan isn't geared up to tourists and there aren't an abundance of hotels. Most towns have at least one place to stay, but many small villages don't. Not to worry - Sudanese hospitality means that you will invariably receive countless offers of accomodation. They won't see you sleeping rough on the street! (although I did try that once, but that's another story!)

Chances are someone you meet - on the journey or when you arrive in the town - will soon ask you to stay with them and their family. It may not be luxurious (although who knows, you might strike lucky!) but it's a great way to experience real Sudanese life. After being in Sudan a while I adopted a very casual attitude to travelling - just turning up in a place knowing that I'd find somewhere to spend the night.

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Related to: Budget Travel, Backpacking
  • Written December 10, 2003
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These guys soon found me somewhere to stay


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  • mafi_moya profile photo mafi_moya
  • Reviews: 482

3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

From the top to the very very bottom!

Accomodation in Sudan, like many countries, is a very mixed bag. In Khartoum and Port Sudan there are international standard 5-star hotels such as the Hilton, as well as rat and cockroach infested hovels. What there isn't much of is the mid-range accomodation that most travellers are after - there is 'luxury' and 'slum' and only a few decent places in between.

Outside these two cities there is far less choice. Most medium sized cities (El Obeid, Wad Medani etc) have one old colonial hotel with grandiose pretensions that don't quite materialise. Most other places don't even have that. Towns generally have one or two places for strangers to stay called lokandas - usually a bed in a dorm room for a dollar or so. They're always basic but at best they're clean and friendly - at worst filthy and bug infested.

No worries though, if you don't mind roughing it there will nearly always be somewhere to stay no matter where you go. And chances are that a local will invite you to his house anyway. In some cases this might be a better bet than the hotel!

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Related to: Budget Travel, Business Travel
  • Written October 30, 2003
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A central Khartoum hotel


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  • maykal profile photo maykal
  • Reviews: 1360

3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

Where to stay...

In Khartoum and Port Sudan at least, you can choose between 5* luxury and dirty flophouse, with everything in between. International standard places like the Hilton, Meridien, Grand Holiday Villa (the historic place where Winston Churchill once rested his head) all come at considerable cost, and all do their best to shelter their guests from the wild savage Sudan which snaps at their gold-plated, double-glazed, glass doors. However, not everyone can afford such places, so here I'm going to explain a bit about how to cope with a Sudanese hotel. Most towns in Sudan have at least one laconda, which is a local hotel aimed at locals. They might be a bit wary of foreigners, but as there is usually no other alternative, they don't usually turn you away. Rooms (if there are any) are basic...you come to lacondas to sleep only, so they rpovide beds and mattresses, and sometimes a sheet or two if you are lucky. Often there will be ten or more beds in a room, so it is more like a dormitory than a hotel. You can also sleep outside, which is a fantastic option, as long as it is not rainy season. Sudanese women wouldn't be caught dead in such an establishment, but exceptions are made for foreigners, but expect no privacy.

Bathrooms are without fail dismal affairs. Badly lit, unventilated, swarming with insects of the type you'd only had nightmares about, they encourage you to "drop and go". Lingering is not advisable! They are always "hole in the ground" toilets, which in my view are hard on the legs if you spend too long, but much more hygienic than sit-down types. Usually there is a water container outside in the courtyard, from which you fill a small bucket with a funnel (called an ibreeq). Just to warn you, there is no concept of toilet paper here! Showers are usually buckets of water, or if there is a shower head, it is probably over the toilet itself, acting as a flush...Sudan is one place you don't want to lose your balance!!!

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Written September 5, 2003

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  • kucha profile photo kucha
  • Reviews: 671

1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

Friends: Step One: Avoid Hotels

Try to avoid hotels. Our best accommodation was with the chief of the local village in Um Rawaba. His family served us food (I was allowed to sit at the table as an 'honorary man') which was delicious and plentiful. Staying with friends, as we did in Um Rawaba, is another good idea.

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Written September 7, 2002

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  • Doombert profile photo Doombert
  • Reviews: 13

1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

I stayed with friends in...

I stayed with friends in Khartoum and with that family in Kosti. Only one night did i stay at a hotel (if you want to call it that), the 'Tourism Hotel' in Sennar, southeast of Khartoum on the Blue Nile. The room was extremely spartan, the beds a bit smelly, but otherwise clean. Unlike the bathroom, which was absolutely revolting. No shower-taking in there, that's for sure!
The room for four people was the equivalent of about 5 pounds (UK).

Hardly anyone there and the most disgusting bathroom i have ever seen!

  • Opinion of Price: most expensive
  • Written August 26, 2002

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  • Narviking profile photo Narviking
  • Reviews: 178

1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

I never stayed in a hotel in...

I never stayed in a hotel in Sudan. In Khartoum I stay with the guy I met on the plane and his family. In Port Sudan I stay with my friend Babiker. Ofcourse there are hotels in Sudan but as I never tried them I cant really reccomend any special. As hospitality in Sudan is just fantastic you may well end up with getting a room in someones house. I lived like a king in my friend Babikers house. Got my own little apartment with WC, shower, TV, balcony with view over the town, refrigator full of cold cokes, was served breakfast on my bed in the morning. And all for free.... I was told I was a guest and to give money was an insult! THE PHOTO: THATS THE PLACE WERE I STAY IN PORT SUDAN.

  • Opinion of Price:
  • Written August 25, 2002
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