Capella Lodge

5 out of 5 stars5 Stars

Australia

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98%

Satisfaction Excellent
Excellent
93%
125
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6
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1%
2
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1
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0

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Similarly priced and rated as other 5 star hotels

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  • Solo100
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More about Lord Howe Island

Photos

Getting the damaged float out of the way.Getting the damaged float out of the way.

A very 'second hand' floatA very 'second hand' float

Wingtip in the beach sand.Wingtip in the beach sand.

Getting the beach set upGetting the beach set up

Forum Posts

visiting Lord Howe in August

by sylwester

we are planning visit island in August 2010, and looking for travel tips.
Thanks,
Sylwester

Re: visiting Lord Howe in August

by lynnehamman

There are many pages & tips about Lord Howe Island here on VT. Go to search box (top right of page) enter LORD HOWE ISLAND AS keywords- and click go.
Pages will appear- read through some of the exclellent tips.

Re: visiting Lord Howe in August

by sylwester

Thank you.
Sylwester

Re: visiting Lord Howe in August

by DenisOB

Hi Sylwester, August is not the very best time for LHI but you should have a good time anyway. For accomodation try Somerset Apartments - right near the cafe, little shops and lagoon and a few minutes from Ned's Beach. At Ned's Beach you can hire wet suits and snorkelling gear using an honesty box. Lots of fish and good snorkelling and warmer water there than in the deeper water in the lagoon which is now quite cold. We used Oxley Travel for a cheap deal for airfares plus accomodation. Have fun,

Travel Tips for Lord Howe Island

By flying boat in 1974 – leaving Sydney

by tiabunna

Early on a wintery June morning, I found myself at the old Rose Bay flying boat base in Sydney, waiting to board. It almost could have been a scene from the 1930s, with the jetty, the waiting Sandringham flying boat, the flags flying above the cockpit: so different from the hustle of a modern jetport. This really was being in a time warp – one of the last trips flown on what had been the last scheduled flying boat service in the world! We had to wait while a Department of Civil Aviation launch ensured that the landing area was clear for takeoff.

By flying boat from Sydney in 1974

by tiabunna

The sensations of takeoff and landing in a flying boat are somewhat different than in a jet. There is not the same urgent push in your back, just a gentle acceleration accompanied by bumping as the hull strikes small wavelets. Outside the ground does not rush past, instead there are sheets of water as takeoff commences: these gradually subside as the speed builds up and the flying boat moves “onto the step” and begins to aquaplane across the surface. At this stage takeoff becomes very smooth and then the climb begins. Landing, not surprisingly, is the reverse – an imperceptable touchdown on the water, followed by increasing bumping and spray.

I have a vivid memory of watching as one of Sydney’s hydrofoil Manly ferries flashed past as we began our takeoff run. I watched through the spray as we gradually overhauled it, then caught up and lifted away alongside (photo 2), then passing an outbound Manly ferry (photo 3) and banking north over Fort Denison (photo 4) before the harbour bridge, with the city and partly-built opera house on our left.

Arriving at the island

by tiabunna

This photo, taken as we arrived, shows the south central part of the island, the cliffs of Mt Lidgbird disappearing into the clouds, and part of the reef and lagoon on the western side of the island. The prevailing winds here, particularly in the summer, are from the south east, so the lagoon is usually quite sheltered. You also see here a good reflection of the window on the other side of the aircraft’s cabin.

The second photo shows the clouds of spray as we arrived. Then everything became quiet and stopped shaking, as the four large engines were stopped and we dropped anchor (3rd photo).

'Beachcomber' VH-BRC

by tiabunna

Built during WWII as a Sunderland patrol aircraft, in 1947 the factory took it back and rebuilt it for passenger use: in 1974 she was the world’s last airworthy genuine Short Sandringham flying boat.. She proudly carried the name Beachcomber , was registered VH-BRC and flew for Ansett Flying Boat Services. I’m glad that she now is preserved in a museum in Southampton in the UK – if you click here you can see photos of her now, including the interior.

She carried about 35 passengers and had a purser and air hostess. I wish I had taken photos of the interior (but you can see some on the link above): this was the most comfortable aircraft I’ve ever flown in and worlds apart from being shoe-horned into a modern jet. Passengers sat facing each other in little separate cabins like a train carriage, with ample leg room and open luggage racks above. This was flying in style: the cabin dividers were timber panelled and there were large windows, through which was the reassuring sight of two large propellors on each side – and, in case those should stop, an even more reassuring large float a little further out.

Shortly after takeoff from Sydney, the cabin crew came around with a ‘home cooked’ breakfast of scrambled eggs, tomato and toast, made in the aircraft’s galley by the purser. None of the pre-prepared shrink-wrapped plasticised rubbish airlines now serve!

The flying boat was unpressurised, so we travelled at a comfortable 7,000 feet, below cloud level and with an excellent view of the island as we approached (see page heading photo).

Disembarking

by tiabunna

Not surprisingly, with a flying boat there are no covered gangways for boarding and disembarking. We had to climb from the flying boat into a small open motorboat to go ashore. As we did, I took this photo of the purser standing in the front mooring hatch – apart from his cabin duties, he also had to operate as the ship’s deck hand for mooring. The open front door of the aircraft is also visible.

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We've found that other people looking for this hotel also know it by these names:

Capella Resort All Inclusive
Capella Hotel Lord Howe Island

Address: Australia