Best Western Murchison Lodge

3 out of 5 stars3 Stars

9 Murchison Highway Somerset Burnie Tas Australia
BEST WESTERN Murchison Lodge
Enter dates for best prices
Compare best prices from top travel partners
Expedia.com Agoda.com Orbitz.com

92%

Satisfaction Excellent
Excellent
28%
14
Very Good
38%
19
Average
26%
13
Poor
2%
1
Terrible
4%
2

Value Score Poor Value

Costs 41% more than similarly rated 3 star hotels

Show Prices

Good For Solo
  • Families72
  • Couples68
  • Solo100
  • Business57

More about Burnie

Photos

yummy pies & baked goods w/ seaside viewsyummy pies & baked goods w/ seaside views

the bake shopthe bake shop

Preston fallsPreston falls

view going to the fallsview going to the falls

Travel Tips for Burnie

Burnie, Important Port with Hidden Beauty

by AusPinay

"Industrial Town But Has Hidden Gems"

As an important port in Tassie, it has become a remarkable town with the discovery of mineral deposits in the west coast, via the Mt. Bischoff mines and Burnie's population has increased dramatically over the years.

According to the info provided by Princess cruises, it now has around 19,000 people and a major industrial centre and one of Australia's largest and most significant deepwater shipping contaniner ports handling over two million tons of cargo a ywar. Many of its cargo are sent worldwide- honey, fruits and vegies and many more.

Our bus tour guide gave us a good lesson on the many products of Tasmania sent overseas and around Australia via Burnie.

Burnie - Centre of the Tasmania's North West Coast

by Peter_the_greater

"The Town"

I chose to remain in Tasmania, the southern most state of Australia because of its lifestyle. I like bushwalking, rock climbing, caving, white-water canoeing and trout fishing. I was lucky, then, to get employment at Burnie, from where I can do all these things within one hours travel.
Burnie is the picturesque centre to the Northwest Coast, the pick of a beautiful state. It has 20,000 people and is an industrial and farming centre with access to the rugged West Coast and only 3 1/2 hours from the capital Hobart in the south.
Burnie is serviced by a local airport at Wynyard, with several flights per day from Melbourne and has extensive social facilities, including the Pioneer Village museum and an art gallery and sporting facilities. It has a magnificent deepwater port which hosts up to 30 tourist cruises each summer. Burnie owed its current development to the establishment of a major pulp and paper industry in the 1930s. Today this operates as a small paper mill only. The area surrounding Burnie is a rich chocolate basalt soil ideal for farming, the major crops being potatoes and vegetables. Dairying and beef are other major facets of this industry. Burnie ia also home to a cheese factory, exporting to Europe with a tasting centre, and next door to a whisky distillery with a delightful restaurant with glorious views.
If visiting, the view from Round Hill, shown, is worth the look. A night visit shows many wild animals on the access road plus wonderful star-scapes. A hand-made paper mill displays incredible paper sculptures and must be one of a kind. Burnie Park, 10 minutes walk from the city centre, is magnificent 7 ha area well treed with paths following a creek to a waterfall. Ten minutes south is a magnificent international rhododendron garden of some 13 ha. Best seen in November. A further five minutes south, the majestic Guide Falls is found in the middle of prime farming land. Three km from Burnie’s centre Fern Glade is a beautiful riverside sanctuary where you can see platypus in the wild. It features the majestic Dicksonia manfern and is also home to an earthworm sanctuary. Burnie is also home to a colony of Little Penguins, and has a viewing site where the penguins can be seen of an evening.
If you like trout fishing there is a privately owned fly fishery twenty minutes out, with lakes stocked with good size brown and rainbow trout.
Burnie has a range of dining facilities, but my favourite is the Baltimore – a converted railway station with excellent cuisine. You might also like Fish Frenzy overlooking the beach.
If you are looking for accomodation there is a wide range including 4 1/2 star historic National Trust rated Glen Osborne House B&B and hotels and motels and other B&B

"See in Burnie"

If visiting, the view from Round hill, shown, is worth the look. A night visit shows many wild animals on the access road plus wonderful star-scapes. A hand made paper mill displays incredible paper sculptures and must be one of a kind. Burnie Park, 10 minutes walk from the centre, is magnificent large grassed area well treed with paths following a creek to a waterfall. Ten minutes south is a magnificent international rhododendron garden of some 13 ha. best seen in November. A further five minutes south, the majestic Guide Falls is found in the middle of prime farming land. Three km from Burnie’s centre Fern Glade is a beautiful riverside sanctuary featuring the majestic Dicksonia manfern and is also home to an earthworm sanctuary. Burnie is also home to a colony of Little Penguins, and has a viewing site where penguins can be seen of an evening.
If you like trout fishing there is a privately owned fly fishery twenty minutes out, with lakes stocked with good size brown and rainbow trout.

"Around Burnie"

Wynyard, 15 km west features the spectacular Table Cape, which has acres of tulips and a tulip festival in the spring. Travelling one hour west you reach the historic and quaint town of Stanley at the foot of The Nut – a huge volcanic plug with a cable lift, and extending into the sea.
To the east are the towns of Penguin, Ulverstone and the City of Devonport, where you can enter the state on the Bass Strait Ferry – Spirit of Tasmania – daily from Melbourne. Behind Ulverstone is Wing's wildlife Park. So many people have spoken of this in ecstatic terms - Tasmanian, devils, koalas wombats and the list goes on. I think they have accomodation too, plus they are on the Leven River and not far from Gunn's Plains caves. If you like caves a trip to the caves at Mole Creek a further 50 km west is worth while. This aea contains both A1 tourist caves and A1++ wild caves, but you need to be with a club to get into these.
Just 90 minutes South from Burnie, you have the wonderful Cradle Mountain - Lake St Clair National Park with an excellent visitor centre, a range of accommodation to 4½ star. The key feature of this area is Cradle Mountain itself – a day to climb from the car park, and Dove Lake which has an easy 3 hr walk round excellent tracks. This is a photographer’s delight. If you are a bushwalker, the Park (needs booking) offers a 4 or 5 day walk from north to south or back, but there are many diversions and mountains and you could spend a lot longer. Caution, this is an alpine area and subject to snow, even in summer. People have died through not being prepared. For practical advice contact the Backpacker's Barn in Devonport.

Burnie

by Supersillysezza2

"Burnie"

I live in a suburb just outside of Burnie called Somerset. Burnie is an alright place to travel but then again I've lived in it my whole life so it just feels like theres nothing exciting to do altough a lot of Australian tourists come to Tasmania to see its natural beauty. In tasmania we have a few landmarks such as Cradle Mountain and the Woolnorth Windfarm.

Comments

Popular Hotels in Burnie

Best Western Murchison Lodge

Hotel Class 3 out of 5 stars

9 Murchison Highway Somerset Burnie

Show Prices

Best Western Chancellor Inn Burnie

Hotel Class 3 out of 5 stars

139 Wilson Street, , Burnie

Show Prices

Beachfront Voyager Motor Inn Burnie

9 North Terrace, , Burnie

Show Prices
Show Prices

View all Burnie hotels

View all Burnie hotels

Latest Burnie hotel reviews

Beachfront Voyager Motor Inn Burnie
56 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Mar 20, 2014