Le Chatelain Boutique Hotel Brussels

5 out of 5 stars5 Stars

Rue du Chatelain 17, Brussels, 1000, Belgium
Le Chatelain Hotel
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Expedia.com Hotels.com Travelocity

91%

Satisfaction Excellent
Excellent
39%
51
Very Good
37%
48
Average
15%
20
Poor
6%
8
Terrible
1%
2

Value Score Average Value

Similarly priced and rated as other 5 star hotels

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Good For Solo
  • Families80
  • Couples79
  • Solo81
  • Business78

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The Reason Why!The Reason Why!

Forum Posts

Rent a car or take a train?

by rickd11

We will be land in Brussels with five people and taking side trips to Amsterdam and Brugge. Our schedule goes like this Brussels to Amsterdam, Amsterdam to Brussels, Brussels to Brugge, Brugge back to Brussels. Lots of trains, so my thoughts are that renting a car for five people will be less expensive. Also, is it problem bringing a car from Belgium to the Neitherlands.

Thanks, Rick

Re: Rent a car or take a train?

by qaminari

It is no problem taking a hire car from Belgium to the Netherlands and with 5 people and presumably quite a bit of luggage you may prefer to drive (although I can't tell from the information given whether it would be less expensive - you would need to provide ages for train fares within Belgium!); but bear in mind that you won't be able to park - or it will be very expensive - in the centre of any of these cities. Incidentally, you don't need to go via Brussels to get to Brugge from Amsterdam, whether by train or by car: by train you would change in Antwerp.
If you did decide to go by train, within Belgium itself you can get a Belgian Railways Rail Pass for 10 trips anywhere in Belgium for €74, which can be used between you. So for Brussels-Antwerp, Antwerp-Brussels, Brussels-Brugge and Brugge back to Brussels = 4 trips for 5 persons, you could get 2 x 10-trip cards for €148, leaving just Antwerp-Amsterdam and Amsterdam-Antwerp to pay separately. How much that would cost would depend on what type of train you take (high-speed Thalys or normal InterCity) and whether you would be travelling on a weekday or could use a weekend return (€47, which is about half the normal price), you can see what it would cost for your dates on http://www.b-europe.com/Travel/Top%20Destinations/Amsterdam?gclid=CJmrmc2d8qYCFYqDDgodIGc4BQ

Re: Rent a car or take a train?

by rickd11

Thank you. This was great information.

Travel Tips for Brussels

Street art(ists)

by marielexoteria

In front of Galeries Royales de St. Hubert we saw 3 street artists. The first one was someone playing with a hula hoop and the second and third ones were playing an instrument/singing. Of the 3, the third one was the most entertaining, singing songs by Eric Clapton and other known artists.

Not too far from there, on Rue au Marché aux Herbs, I found an AIDS awareness mural that says the following text:
"Time goes by, but not AIDS. I get informed, I protect myself, I am solidary."

You must spend time around...

by deker

You must spend time around Grand Place (Grote Markt), many people around walking, looking at the beutiful buldings around... Well spending time among the crowd was great, but I loved the park in Heysel where you can see the famous Atomium and Mini Europe..
You feel as if you are far from all the problems..I felt lucky to feel the sprit of the coming spring..

Be on the lookout for Belgian Cartoon - TINTIN!

by jumpingnorman

When in Belgium, be on the lookout for pictures of TINTIN, a famous Belgian cartoon character who has recently been on newspapers/magazines (2009) because Steven Spielberg has become interested in making a movie about him. I was actually reading about this while I was having my hair cut by my Russian barber today!

George Remi created this character who first appeared in the newspaper Le Vingtième Siècle on 10 January 1929. Tintin is actually a young Belgian reporter who is aided in his adventures from the beginning by his faithful fox terrier dog Snowy and later accompanied by the brash, cynical and grumpy Captain Haddock, the bright but hearing-impaired Professor Calculus) and others…The slapstick humour, colourful illustrations, along with the satire of the political and ciltural milieu makes this wonderful comic appealing to both kids and adults.

125 rue Blaes - not all it appears to be

by GillianMcLaughlin

In rue Blaes, take a few moments to wander into number 125. It's one of quite a number of large, overcrowded, eclectic antique shops. Now, before you flash the cash for that must-have chaise longue with velour zebra print, take a moment to look through all the tempting objets d'art to the building itself. I openly admit that this is a difficult task as the shope is full to cracking with goods.

From the ground floor you'll see that in the centre the roof is very high. In fact the building had been used previously as a walpaper factory, and they used to hang the lengths of paper to dry in the centre. At the rear of the shop you'll find a staircase that willlead you up to the first floor gallery.

Off you go.

Now turn your eyes to the wall on your right hand side and peer at it. A bit harder... go on... See it? Yes, beneath layers of paper and paint writing was discovered on the wall. This was the only clue to another life in the many that this building has experienced: a synagogue. The photo shows one of two examples of this. So there's another thing to love about this city... well two really. The buidling are not always beautiful, this one certainly isn't, but they have incredible histories. And the second thing? Well it would have been easy to slap a coat of paint over the walls during renovation... but no, they leave their discovery uncovered for all to see... and noone knows it's there!

Go and have a look

Hotel Watteyne (Franz Tilley 1902)

by Klod5

Cette maison a été construite en 1902 pour M. Watteyne par Franz Tilley (1872-1929). Outre son intérêt architectural, est également connue pour avoir été durant des années le siège du Foyer Oriental Chrétien.

L'activité de ce foyer était double :

il était le siège de la paroisse catholique russe (de rite byzantin) dans
laquelle on pouvait admirer un des plus belles iconostases de Bruxelles, réalisée par le célèbre iconographe Morozov.
iconostase : dans les églises orthodoxes, il s'agit de la cloison décorée d'images, d'icônes, qui sépare la nef du sanctuaire où le prêtre officie.

il était également le siège d'une maison d'édtion fondée par Irène Posnoff (ou Irina Posnova) en 1945 : La Vie avec Dieu. Cet éditeur publiait des livres religieux en langue russe et les faisait parvenir clandestinement (en plein guerre froide) de l'autre côté du Rideau de fer. Des émissions radios en langue russe étaient également produites au Foyer.
En conclusion, nous pouvons dire que cette maison a été un important lieu de rencontre pour les Russes et les chrétiens d'Europe Centrale et Orientale durant des années. This house has been constructed in 1902 for M. Watteyne by Franz Tilley (1872-1929). Outrages its architectural interest, is also known to have been during years the seat of the Home Oriental Christian.

The activity of this home was double:

it was the seat of the Russian Catholic parish (of Byzantine ritual) in
which one could admire one of the most beautiful iconostases of Brussels, achieved by the famous Morozov iconographe.
iconostase: in the orthodox churches, it is about the baffle decorated of pictures, of icons, that separate the nave of the sanctuary where the priest officie.

it was also the seat of a house of edtion founded by Irene Posnoff (or Irina Posnova) in 1945: Life with God. This publisher published religious books in Russian language and sent them clandestinely (in full cold war) on the other side of the Curtain of iron. Broadcasts radios in Russian language were also produced to the Home.
In conclusion, we can say that this house was an important place of meeting for the Russians and the Christian of Europe Centrale and Oriental during years.

Comments

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