La Demeure du Parc

6 Rue D'avon, Fontainebleau, 77300, France
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More about Fontainebleau

Photos

Jardin Anglais, Fontainebleau, France 2010Jardin Anglais, Fontainebleau, France 2010

My mother on the tour in 1950My mother on the tour in 1950

just outside the hoteljust outside the hotel

The LibraryThe Library

Forum Posts

Question about the Trinity Chapel

by hippie3mom0

Hi all...I am a historical romance author trying to finish editing my new novel before I send it the editor, and I NEED HELP!! Does anyone know if the Trinity Chapel located within the Chateau de Fontainebleau has a confessional booth? I'm not catholic, but assumed it did...so I put it in my book. Now, I need to make sure it's actually there! Anyone with ideas or suggestions...or better still, an answer...please e-mail me: romance@meaganhatfield.com.
THANKS, MEAGAN :)

RE: Question about the Trinity Chapel

by mccalpin

You might look at http://davidbarber.org/france/fontainebleau/ where the author allegedly took photos of the interior of the Chapel - although he seems to have been confused on which country he was in (humorously, I hope). Since I haven't been there, I can't corraborate the photos, but I find them believable that the Chapel is a relatively open space (i.e., little furniture).

However, you're writing a historical novel, yes? So I assume the story is some time in the past. Since confessionals are often large wooden boxes, it's not unbelievable that one could have been moved into the Chapel, then moved out later (they can be disassembled). The problem I have is that confessionals were normally for parish churches, in which a little privacy is needed. In a private chapel, there would be much less need for a confessional, unless one was imported for artistic reasons (since some are highly carved). The family - assuming they went to confession anyway - would probably have used a small side room instead.

Having said that, given the evident art in these photos, it is hardly a huge stretch that there was a portable (even if quite large) confessional in the Chapel at some point...just say that the carving of the wooden confessional reminded the Chateau's owner of the carvings on the wall, so on a whim he/she imported it...

Works for me...

Bill

RE: RE: Question about the Trinity Chapel

by mariev

I don't remember seeing a confessional booth in this chapel but the idea of a mobile one is interesting - you can visit the chapel virtually at
http://www.musee-chateau-fontainebleau.fr/homes/home_id20392_u1l2.htm

Travel Tips for Fontainebleau

See the Oval Courtyard (The Original Entry)

by hquittner

The oval courtyard was the area of everyday entry from the time of the original manor of the Fontaine de Bliaud in 1137 through the construction of the Porte Doree. The keep (donjon) is still at its depth. It was not open to us during our tour, so our pictures are not entire. The entrance in later years (1605) was graced by the Dauphin's Entrance (Baptismal Gate) which stands just off the two pillars topped by Hermes heads which overlooks the Cour des Offices. This area is surrounded by fine 1609 buildings that contain quarters and kitchens, a place to house the numerous non-noblilty that ran and protected the palace. The courtyard was also the parking-lot for those approved visitors on official business.

The Palace of Fontainebleau

by roamer61

Fontainebleau is a spectacular palace located withnin a 45 minutes drive from Paris. A castle had been built on the spot dating back to the 12th Century. The original castle keep was transformed in the 15th-16th Centuries, giving rise to the magnificent palace we see today. It was further embellished in the following centuries. As a result, one can see a multitude of architectural and decorative styles from different periods.

The adjacent gardens are quite peaceful, full of flowers and other plantings. There is a giftshop on the premises.

fontainebleau

by delcity

well maybe you will like the famous chateau complex and maybe you will not.
i liked the place but i have also had many tell me they thought some of the other places they visited in france was more to there liking.

A Tour of the Palace Interior (pt 3)

by hquittner

"Francois I Salon"

The rest of the Royal Apartments have been occupied by a succession of monarchs with many changes according to their tastes. This Salon in later years has been a private dining room. This and the succeeding two rooms have their walls decorated with series of 17C Gobelin tapestries.

"The Tapestry Salon"

Obviously the feature of this room is tapestry, but on the floor is a large Savonnerie carpet.

"The Empress Antechamber"

This is Second Empire mid 19C decor. Note the two enamel Sevres vases in Indian style, and of course the tapestries.

"The Diana Gallery"

The Gallery had fallen into disrepair when it was converted in the mid-19C into a library. Deep in the room by the window is an enormous Sevres porcelain vase that took 10 years to make (in the 1820's).

"The Empresses' Bedroom"

This is the room that was used by most of the Queens and Empresses. The walls and ceilings are from various periods. The present upholstery is a 1986 remanufacture of the 19C and earlier fabric (brocaded silk).

"Napoleon I's Rooms"

We finally reached the upstairs rooms at the fron, which Napoleon arranged for himself. My photography skills ran out in the dark throne room, but I have recovered a shot of his small special bed in "Egyptian " style. Pope Pius IV used it in the Tuilleries before it came here. There is a whole group of rooms for Napoleon's quirky work habits.

"Napoleon's Bathroom"

We went by this on our way out. It seems that they did not have running water, but at least it was conveniently located.

"The Trinity Chapel"

Seen earlier from above at the private balcony, we entered on the ground floor. Most of the decor is from the times of Louis XIII and HenriIV.

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