Hotel Du Cap Eden Roc

Blvd JF Kennedy, Antibes, French Riviera - Cote d'Azur, 06601, France
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90%

Satisfaction Excellent
Excellent
68%
64
Very Good
14%
14
Average
8%
8
Poor
6%
6
Terrible
2%
2

N/A

Value Score No Data

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Good For Business
  • Families79
  • Couples86
  • Solo100
  • Business100

More about Hotel Du Cap Eden Roc

Grand Hotel du Cap Ferrat

by levine2 about Grand Hotel du Cap Ferrat

Dinner served on a lovely terrace overlooking the Med. Reserve at least a few days ahead. We had my wife's birthday there, everything was good and the
birthday cake terric--served with sparklers!

Cap d'Antibes

by MM212

Cap d'Antibes is a long peninsula that extends between Antibes and Juan-les-Pins. It contains some of the most luxurious villas on the Côte d'Azur and its name is synomymous with luxury. It also contains the world-famous Hôtel du Cap/Eden Roc, where some of the suites cost tens of thousands of euros. It is the hotel of choice for many celebrities, particularly during the Cannes Film Festival. If you are not part of any of this glamour, then a drive around the beautiful cape will probably suffice.

Antibes for Dummies

by NiceLife

"Welcome to the yacht capital of the Med"

Antibes is about beaches, big boats, and Brits. Most important are the boats, especially the giant privately-owned motor-yachts

Rather Big Boats
Attached to the outer harbour of Port Vauban, the International Yacht Club of Antibes (IYCA), is where the giant personal motor-yachts of the world's multi-millionaires are berthed periodically for maintenance and a "wash and brush up"

Inadequately referred to as "millionaires row" - a place in the harbour here requires more than mere millions - anything up to £300m or more for one of the world's top ten superyatchs. In the world of megayachts each foot in length costs approximately £1m.

Pictured in Antibes, what was briefly the second largest yacht in the world, Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen's £113m 416 foot long "Octopus"., She contains a music studio, cinema, basketball court, swimming pool, two helipads and its own submarine. (Couldn't quite get the football pitch in, eh Paul?)

Megayachts are scrubbed and manicured to perfection by bronzed young men mainly from Australia or Britain, until every bit of chrome sparkles in the mediterranean sun. In yatching I am told running costs are estimated at 10% of purchase price. 10% of £100m is..is..is.. gulp! I can do that sum!

Some can be hired at £20-30,000 for a day, typically for the launch party of some film or new brand of perfume. The writer Clive James memorably once described looking up at people on the deck of a yacht looking down at him, on their faces the expression "I'm on a yacht, and you're not".

Roman Abramovich regularly parks some of his several yachts here , and spotted recently climbing on board was Jose Mourinho, manager of Abramovich's Chelsea Football Club. Various Chelsea football players can often be spotted around the Riviera - including one last week looking a bit out of place in Villefranche on and off his mobile phone. (Bit of advice, mate: stick to home. You're out of your league here)

"The sandy beaches of Antibes"

Antibes has three main beaches. Directly through the portal of the old city walls at Port Vauban is the sheltered bay and popular beach La Gravette. Handy to retreat from to nearby restaurants and bars.

A short walk down from old Antibes down Av Amiral de Grasse around the rocky city outlet brings you to the modern Plage de Peilon. Fine yellow sand which shelves gently into the sea is perfect for families, and is served by kiosks serving cold drinks and sandwiches.

Further down the Boulevard James Wyllie the Plage Sallis continues as far as a small fishing boat harbour which marks the end of the bay. All the while the entire sea front of Antibes is public - no private beach clubs sunbeds or parasol hire. And the municipality provide frequent showers, and theres a reasonable loo at Sallis

Walk further past Pointe Bacon some 2 km and discover Antibes "fourth beach" Plage de la Garoupe, and discover the fabulous villas which dot the Cap d'Antibes beyond, culminating with the world-class Hotel du Cap Eden Roc. Taken as the model by F Scott Fitzgerald for Hotel des Etrangers in Tender is the Night, Hotel du Cap Eden Roc is at the tip of the peninsula and has a seawater lagoon swimming pool as there’s no beach. Stars who take refuge here are granted rare privacy.

"Vielle Ville - old Antibes"

Once you have had your fill of lounging on the beach and the floating excesses of the yacht club, there is a maze of pretty streets to wander and explore in this quintessentially seaside resort. Restaurants, bars, bistros and boutiques jostle in the town to which resident Graham Greene would stroll for lunch each day (He would dine at Chez Felix, at the arched entrance from Old Antibes to the Port)

There is a large English community in the town, so expect to see lots of men still wearing socks with their sandals, baggy shorts, British food in supermarkets, and English newspapers - Daily Mail or Express - to follow the latest bad news back home from a comfortable distance..

For a bit of culture, up in the Chateau Grimaldi is a fine collection of works by Picasso. In 1946 he was offered use of part of the Castle and four months later donated 181 drawings and paintings to the town.

Camping France

by JimTammy

""An RV? Are you crazy?""

“An RV? Are you crazy?”

My wife was looking at me over the top of our well-worn copy of Hemingway’s “A Moveable Feast.”

“No I’m serious,” I replied. “We rent an RV in Paris and drive through southern France. No hotels, rental cars, trains, planes, nothing, just you and me and the RV.”

She set the book down and folded her hands and said, “Jim, honey, I don’t think we’re ‘RV people’.”

I waited for that remark to sink in, but didn’t speak because I knew the wheels were turning in her head. I could have made a lot of comments about prejudging, etc. but I waited and then I got the opening.

“Ok, well give me five reasons why this ‘RV’ idea will work.”

At least I had a chance so I took a breath and rolled on.

“First of all we don’t have to look for a hotel, that saves us a lot of time…”

Our fifth trip to France had come about more or less by accident. We wanted to go but who has the time with work and family matters. Then I found myself in late June sitting in my boss’s office in New Jersey as he tried to give me the bad news that they were closing the company and I might not have a job. While he spoke I pictured myself lying by the pool in the South of France at “Hotel Du Cap” sipping a glass of Champagne and trying to ignore the topless beauties in all directions.

With the boring details of jobs out of the way we were set to go, except this time we wanted something different, some way to see more of the country. The thought of taking the train, renting cars, staying in luxury hotels sounds great at first, but when you start thinking about it you start to remember all the hassles involved.

While my wife was being scrubbed and manicured at the Maurice Hotel’s Salon Bleau in Paris I took the RER to the suburbs to pickup our RV. Avis/Caraway, who we rented the RV from, is located in Rueil-Malmaison, a suburb of Paris. They wanted $50 to pick us up and drive us to the location. Checking the map I figured that taking the RER ($4.50) then a Taxi ($5.00) I could save $40.00. I didn’t realize that getting a Taxi at the Rueil-Malmaison RER on Saturday was impossible. I called Avis/Caraway and they directed me to a Bus ($1.10) that just happened to be leaving in a few minutes.

After watching a video and taking a tour of the vehicle the two girls running the place gave me the keys and ran inside. When I double-checked to be sure the RV was in PARK was when I discovered that I better push in the clutch before I tried to start the engine. I hadn’t driven a 5 speed in years and here I was about to drive this oversized van into the heart of Paris.

Through the roundabout at ‘Arc de Triumph” down the Champs Elycees and to our hotel. I am shifting, the plates, dishes, silverware, and everything else is rattling like crazy and of course every French driver is saying, “Oh, look an inexperienced driver in a RV let’s give him a break!”

On the street where our hotel was you couldn’t park a moped sideways and I am at the controls of a 20-foot van. I said the heck with it and just pulled into a bus zone and stopped. Fortunately my wife was in the hotel room and ready to go. We popped out, tossed the stuff in the side door and were on our way.

It took us a bit to get the hang of things, but once we did we had two of the best weeks of our traveling experiences and all at a price that didn’t require us to check the bank account every two days.

In the end there were really ten reasons that we came up with as to why renting an RV was better than any other mode of transportation. We had done the train to hotel to restaurant back to train thing too many times.

Reason number ten; you have your own bathroom. Think about it, how many times have you needed to use the bathroom and can’t find one? Or when you do it is an “Eastern Toilet” and yes us guys could use it, but the women, well I don’t blame them. The RV had a regular clean fresh bathroom and was surprisingly easy to clean.

Number nine, you can park anywhere and early. If you want to see a place you can arrive early, park and take a nap until they open. In some places we parked outside of town at the train station and took the train in. On a Sunday in Marseilles we looked all over for a parking space and couldn’t find one so we went to the train station, parked and took the subway around town. Outside of Limoges the campground was a short ten-minute walk to the train station that took us right downtown. The only problem we ran into at this location was the bar next to the train station sold a decent glass of wine for 60 cents. All in all parking was rarely an issue.

Reason eight, no telephone, no TV and no interruptions. Also we never had a telephone charge on a hotel bill. Every campground had a payphone and with a phone card we could call anywhere. In fact most places had a phone at the front office that allowed us free local phones calls. We did rent a cell phone from TTC for $3.00 per day, which included 10 minutes of daily calling time. It came in handy when we wanted to check our phone messages at home and on occasion to get directions. We didn’t miss the TV at all, however, they are available in some of the campers if you need one.

Number seven, the food. Need I say more? We had our own refrigerator and stove. We could make anything. In the morning we would stop in the boulongerie get a baguette and croissants. There were even campgrounds that would deliver the bread in the morning. If we couldn’t find a place for lunch we could whip up our own. Most evenings we would open a bottle of wine, see what we had in the refrigerator and relax. The average day would start with coffee and croissants, lunch at a local restaurant, and dinner of wine, cheese, fresh vegetables, fruit or left over Coq Au Vin from lunch.

Number six is all the money you save. The RV cost $100 per day, the campgrounds were about $10 to $15 and that was it. No taxes, tips or extras. Also the savings on the food!!! We would go to a place called ‘Leader Price’ a discount grocery store found all over France. We bought wine for $1.50 or $2.00 per bottle, good stuff. Everything was inexpensive; milk less than a dollar, coffee (Cuban) for $2.00 a pound, eggs for 39 cents. The best deal I found was asparagus soup for 39 cents. We would stock up, load it all into the RV and we were set. A meal at a restaurant can run $25 to $30 per person, we could live a week on that. It’s real easy to do, just walk in pick out what you need and pay at the front. Just remember to return your cart and get your Euro back.

Not only do you save money, but also time. Think about all the time you spend searching for hotels either on the road or in advance. You never have to worry about canceling a hotel or racing to a destination because you couldn’t cancel in time. We never had to worry that it was getting close to six o’clock and we better look for a place to stay. Worst case we could just pull over and spend the night. Not relying on restaurant also saved us time and aggravation. If we got really hungry we always had something in the fridge.

Ice is reason number four. You laugh, but try to get ice anywhere in France. You can’t, they just don’t have it. We found these plastic things that came in a roll. You tear one off; hold it under water and it fills these little pockets. Seal the end, put it in the freezer and in a few hours later you have ice. Just take the plastic bag and pop out the cubes one at a time.
Reason number three is the scenery. We took the back roads whenever we could. This not only saved on tolls it also allowed us to see things not on the normal tourist list. We saw cave paintings from 14,000 years ago (Lescaux) and we saw ruins from World War Two (Oradour-Sur-Glane) that we would never have found on the main tourist routes. We would try to park somewhere for lunch or breakfast that would give a great view so we could dine and be entertained. Near the Mediterranean we parked for the night over looking the ocean, little did we know that a jogging path went right by our window. We woke up at 6 in the morning watching people fly by our window, but the sound of the waves crashing on the beach outside our door was worth it.

The second best reason was you could take all your stuff and never once have to pack or unpack it. The only exception was to do laundry, which was available at most campgrounds. We loaded it all in the camper in Paris and put the suitcases away. On a long trip there is nothing worse than hauling your baggage everywhere, but with the RV, we didn’t touch a suitcase for two weeks.

And the number one reason? The French word for camping? Camping! That’s right and not a single variation did I see. In a country where street names change in the middle of the block this is one of the few consistent uses of the French language. Forget the campground guides, you don’t need them. Just show up in any town and they have a campground, in fact most towns have two or three. Some may be a farmer’s field, but all of them have power hookups, water and shower facilities.

Yes, even Paris has campgrounds. I didn’t find any in the heart of the city, but there are a few close to Metro stops so you can park the RV and take the train in. We never had a problem finding a place to camp, however, I would avoid the month of August as every Frenchmen is on holiday then, but we went in September and every place was wide open. Some campgrounds do close in the winter so if you are traveling after October it would be wise to check.

A few nights we wanted to cover a long distance so we drove late into the night. On the main highways they have rest stops every fifteen miles or so. These rest stops have restaurants, showers, everything you would need and they are free. We stopped in one about 1AM and just rolled into our bed and went to sleep. When we woke up the next morning we were parked in front of these ruins of an old Roman Theatre. There wasn’t anyone in site, just us and the giant columns of the theater.

You may not think that camping is for you, but you would be surprised. There are, of course, a few negatives.

The showers can be treacherous. The first night we stayed right outside Chateau Scully in the Loire valley. We woke up to a beautiful morning and as we were preparing to head to the showers we saw a man come out from the shower building wearing only his underwear and flip-flop shoes. We laughed, but a few days later we had our own flip-flops. We did, however, wear a robe over our underwear.

Not only do you save money, but also time. Think about all the time you spend searching for hotels either on the road or in advance. You never have to worry about canceling a hotel or racing to a destination because you couldn’t cancel in time. We never had to worry that it was getting close to six o’clock and we better look for a place to stay. Worst case we could just pull over and spend the night. Not relying on restaurant also saved us time and aggravation. If we got really hungry we always had something in the fridge.

Ice is reason number four. You laugh, but try to get ice anywhere in France. You can’t, they just don’t have it. We found these plastic things that came in a roll. You tear one off; hold it under water and it fills these little pockets. Seal the end, put it in the freezer and in a few hours later you have ice. Just take the plastic bag and pop out the cubes one at a time.
Reason number three is the scenery. We took the back roads whenever we could. This not only saved on tolls it also allowed us to see things not on the normal tourist list. We saw cave paintings from 14,000 years ago (Lescaux) and we saw ruins from World War Two (Oradour-Sur-Glane) that we would never have found on the main tourist routes. We would try to park somewhere for lunch or breakfast that would give a great view so we could dine and be entertained. Near the Mediterranean we parked for the night over looking the ocean, little did we know that a jogging path went right by our window. We woke up at 6 in the morning watching people fly by our window, but the sound of the waves crashing on the beach outside our door was worth it.

Photos

AntibesAntibes

Look backLook back

aquariumsaquariums

Flower filled streetsFlower filled streets

Forum Posts

Marineland and Oceanographic Museum in monaco

by johndoe78

Hi,
I have some dilema choosing between to two.
is those places overlap in their experience?
i especially want to entertain my 1.y years old boy,
i afraid Marineland will be to big and overwhelmingfor him...
and on the other hand, i really would like to be in both places, but don't want to get bored if it is the same in some manners.

what do you think?
thanks

Re: Marineland and Oceanographic Museum in monaco

by NiceLife

As a one year old I have no recollection of anything I did or saw, and was probably more interested in playing with my food. I suggest you be selfish a moment and choose the one that most interests you. Marineland is aimed at Disney-level entertainment - the Musee Oceonographique is genuinely fascinating, accompanied also by the sights of Monaco. Personally i would choose the latter every time.

Re: Marineland and Oceanographic Museum in monaco

by vinc_bilb

Hello,

I spent 1 we in Marineland of Antibes and I don't recommend to go here with a very young kid. The visit is excellent, shows too, ... but for adults and chidrens older than 5y as a minimum, it could be paintfull (sun, crowded, ...) for him and ... his parents as a consequence. Avoid the Sunday! (my advise)

For Oceanographic mus, I think interest for your kid is questionnable ... but it will be more confortable.

More under
http://www.oceano.mc/anglais/sommaireinfos_anglais.htm
http://www.marineland.fr/Default.aspx?NavID=SiteMap&LanguageID=EN

I hope it could help

Re: Marineland and Oceanographic Museum in monaco

by johndoe78

Thank you for your posts - It really helps.

Travel Tips for Antibes

Antibes Marineland

by Doug767

A great place to visit for the day.
The highlight for me was seeing the 'Killer whale' show - a real spectacle!
Also worth viewing is the Dolphin show and fascinating aquarium and 30m 'shark tunnel'
Also on site is 'Aquasplash' , large swimming pool area with various 'water slides' to have fun on. 'Mini-golf' is nearby as well.
There are good quality restaurants and snack bars on site.
Entrance fee varies on the time of year (closed January) peak summer time fees start at € 34 adult, € 25 child, rising to € 42 adult, € 33 child with different admission fees if you want to combine a visit to 'Aquasplash' etc.
Admission time starts at 10am.
'Meet the dolphins' price, approx 1 hour swimming with them is € 65 each.

Comments

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 Hotel Du Cap Eden Roc

We've found that other people looking for this hotel also know it by these names:

Hotel Du Cap
Du Cap Eden Roc Antibes

Address: Blvd JF Kennedy, Antibes, French Riviera - Cote d'Azur, 06601, France