Hotel Villa Am Kurpark

Kaiser-Friedrich-Promenade 57, Bad Homburg, Hesse, 61348, Germany
Hotel Villa Am Kurpark
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82%

Satisfaction Very Good
Excellent
16%
1
Very Good
33%
2
Average
33%
2
Poor
16%
1
Terrible
0%
0

N/A

Value Score No Data

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Good For Couples
  • Families100
  • Couples100
  • Solo50
  • Business25

More about Bad Homburg vor der Höhe

Photos

Lebanese Ceder, Bad Homburg, DELebanese Ceder, Bad Homburg, DE

Erlöserkirche, Bad Homburg, DEErlöserkirche, Bad Homburg, DE

The White Tower and Palace in Bad HomburgThe White Tower and Palace in Bad Homburg

3. Information screen in the number 1 bus3. Information screen in the number 1 bus

Travel Tips for Bad Homburg vor der Höhe

Schreiner Pfeiffer

by mauro_pd

In Bad Homburg, a well known city close to FFurt, there's this nice place whre you can eat & drink in a former carpenter shop.
The place is called 'Schreiner Pfeiffer' and you can find it in Audenstrasse 6.

More info about Bad Homburg: www.bad-homburg.de (the picture is from the site).

Hölderlin Path crossing the Autobahn

by Nemorino

Photos:
1. Hölderlin Path crossing the Autobahn.
2. Looking back at Frankfurt.
3. Looking back at Frankfurt again.
4. Looking across the fields towards the Taunus Hills. The highest peak is the one with the little tower on it, the Feldberg. The peak off to the left with a patch of white snow, the Altkönig (Old King) looks higher from this angle, but actually it's only the second highest.

Between Frankfurt and Bad Homburg the Hölderlin Path has to make three separate Autobahn-crossings, once going under and twice going over the motorways.

The German Autobahn system was conceived in the 1920s and the first short section was opened in 1931, before the Nazis came into power. So it wasn't their idea, but the Nazis were quick to recognize the military potential of the system, so they built several new sections during the 1930s, using slave labor in some cases.

After the Second World War the Autobahn system became bigger and more brutal with each successive government, no matter which political party or parties happened to be in control. The last Social Democratic chancellor, Gerhard Schröder, who held this office from 1998 to 2005, had no compunctions about describing himself as a "car chancellor" -- evidently unaware that he was confessing to destructive and anti-social priorities. The electorate noticed, however, and in the past few years the Social Democratic party has lost nearly half its voters, in part (but not only) because of its reactionary transportation policies.

Since I successfully kicked the driving habit a number of years ago, I can no longer speak from recent personal experience, but my advice to foreign visitors is to avoid driving on the German Autobahn system, or at least have a look beforehand at what VT member Trekki (Ingrid), who I believe is still a frequent driver, has to say about it in one of the Transportation tips on her Germany page.

The Little Opera of Bad Homburg

by Nemorino

Since 1990 Bad Homburg has been the home base of a small but energetic opera company, the Kleine Oper Bad Homburg, which specializes in opera performances for children.

They only perform occasionally in Bad Homburg, however, because they are usually on tour throughout Germany.

In 2009, for instance, they only have seven performances planned for Bad Homburg, and of these five are reserved for schools. the other two are an open-air performance in the Kurpark on July 18th, and a 20th anniversary gala in the English Church on November 20th.

In September 2010 they are planning a new (children's) production of Mozart's Magic Flute, and the premiere will be here in the Kurtheater in Bad Homburg, before they take it out on the road.

I'm happy to say that I know several of the very talented people involved in the Kleine Oper Bad Homburg, such as the soprano Ingrid El Sigai and the pianist Stefan Geier.

Half-timbered houses in the Old Town

by Nemorino

Photos:
1. Half-timbered houses
2. Plaque on one of the houses: "One of the oldest houses of the Old Town, built 1583, exposed and renovated 1978."
3. Oldest half-timbered house.
4. Plaque on this house: "Oldest dated house in the Old Town, built 1505-1508, renovated and restored 1989-1991."

In the 19th century, owners of half-timbered houses tended to be ashamed of them because they looked old-fashioned. So they smeared plain white plaster over the facades to make the houses look more modern.

In the 20th century the old half-timbered looked came back into fashion (it was so old it was something special), so the owners of these houses went to a lot of trouble and expense to remove the white plaster and expose the half-timbered structure again.

In the 21st century heating costs have gone up so much that the problem arises of how to insulate these houses. If you put insulation on the outside you again conceal the half-timbered structure, but it you put the insulation on the inside you make the rooms of the house even smaller than they already are.

My advice about half-timbered houses is to enjoy looking at them, but don't buy one.

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