IMI Residence Dublin

3 out of 5 stars3 Stars

Sandyford Rd, Dublin, County Dublin, Ireland
IMI Residence Dublin
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11
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More about IMI Residence Dublin

Attractions:

by Krystynn

"Dublin Castle"




Above: The majestic looking Tower, dating to as far back as 1411... and rebuilt in the late 1770s.

Dublin Castle was founded in 1204 by the order of King John who wanted a fortress constructed for the administration of the city. The castle was placed on high ground to the east of the city and was originally protected by the Poddle river (now found underground) which was later used to fill a moat around the walls.

The original castle is now the Record Tower. Within the complex is the 19th Century Gothic Revival Chapel Royal (restored in 1989), the Great Courtyard, the Gate of Fortitude, the State Apartments and others.

In times past, Dublin Castle was also used as the official residence of the British Viceroys of Ireland, until the Viceregal Lodge was built in Phoenix Park. Today, this historic castle is being used for (mainly) state functions....

How do you get there?

If you walk up to Dame Street, past the Olympia Theater... and voila, to your left is Dublin Castle.

"Guinness Storehouse"




If your greatest desire is to drink the best Guinness in the world, then you gotta come to Dublin for sure. Not kidding. I don't know how they brew it but the Guinness found here is definitely the best and purest that I've tasted (not that I'm that great a beer drinker myself).

Anyhow, the Guinness Storehouse is actually a museum (surprise, surprise) dedicated to Ireland's most famous export - yes, Guinness stout.

If you take a tour of this entire museum, you'd discover that Arthur Guinness (founder and inventor of the beer) first began brewing the 'black gold' on this site in 1759.

Now, admission to the Guinness Storehouse is not free of charge but hey, you get to drink a free pint of the magic brew at the end of your self-discovery tour!

Address:

Guinness Storehouse,
St James Gate,
Dublin 8, Ireland

Website: Guinness Storehouse - Official Site

Admission Fee: IEP9 (Euros???). A free pint of Guinness is included.

Happy? :-))

Above: That is moi inside the Guinness Storehouse. No comment about my hair. That's what happens when you don't have enough time to style it.... Oh well.

This is a very interesting bar (above pic). Noticed that long thick pipe hanging across the room? Well, the Guinness beer just so happens to flow through it. A very interesting and unique feature.

If you pop over to the second floor, all your secret questions about Guinness and beer brewing will be answered. Don't forget to check it out.

P.S. Forget about taking the elevator up (the queue is forever loooong). Take the flight of stairs up instead. Much faster too.

Are you ready for a little bit of Guinness history (now don't fall asleep on me!)... The Guinness Bbrewery has been in operation since 1759 when Arthur Guinness purchased and renovated the 'Rainbow Brewery' and started to brew his prize winning potion which has since become renowned worldwide.

NOBODY comes to Ireland without drinking a pint of Guinness... unless of course if you're a Muslim. It's like visiting New York without seeing the Statue of Liberty or flying in to Beijing without scaling the Great Wall of China! Er... getting the point?

All the different bottles containing Guinness (above) that was ever manufactured and sold since the late 1700s.

Above: That's yours truly livin' it up at the topmost floor of the Guinness Storehouse known simply as the Gravity Bar.

This is where you get your free pint of Guinness and marvel at the 360 degrees panoramic view of the Dublin skyline! Lovely.

The 360 degrees panoramic view of the Fair City as seen from the Gravity Bar.

Above: Guinness, anyone? :-))

Above: If you're hungry, you can head over to the Brewery Bar for some light sandwiches, soup and a cuppa coffee... or beer! :-)

This is where we had a light lunch. The price is reasonable but the food and service is nothing to rave about. I wouldn't recommend anyone to have a meal here. For drinks only... perhaps.

"Trinity College"




Calling all geeks (oops!) out there in cyberspace: Don't forget to check out the OLDEST university in Ireland, founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth 1. Trinity College.

Not only is it the oldest university in Ireland, it is also one of the oldest in Europe boasting an impressive list of alumni which includes Samuel Beckett, Jonathan Swift (remember "Gulliver's Travels"?), Bram Stoker (yup, the man who immortalized "Dracula" in novels) and Oscar Wilde amongst others. It used to play a somewhat controversial role in Irish politics and religion (the world's two most taboo topics!). Since and until 1873, only Anglicans could enrol as full members of the University to obtain degrees and scholarships; Catholics were even forbidden to use the library! Don't worry... Things have changed and improved considerably since then.

Today, the University has a strong reputation for excellence in research and scholarship across a wide range of subjects, including technological subjects. Approximately 10,000 students are currently enrolled in the university. Academically renowned, it is definitely on par with Oxford and Cambridge, from which it is modeled.

If you interested to study here, the centrally-located college has over 40 departments which offer a wide variety of courses. Facilities include Trinity's historic dining hall (built in 1761... would you believe it?), sports center, health center, chapel etc.

Despite the excellent public transportation system found in Dublin (read: buses and the DART), students tend to get around mostly by bicycle (see pic above).

Just a few steps off campus you will find yourself in the bustling capital city of Dublin.



Trinity College is strategically located right smack in the city center. So, you really have absolutely no excuse not to visit this landmark educational institution. It took me about 5 minutes to walk from St Stephen's Green (where I was staying) to Trinity College via Grafton Street. It's actually located on the tail end of this pedestrianized street where the statue of Molly Malone is found.

Now... there. I've given you the directions to walk there. So... GO!

Above & Below: In case some of you need a sitemap... Hope this will do?

Above: Statue of my great grandfather. Relax, I'm only kidding...

Above & Below: That is moi. Ahem.


Contact Address:
Trinity College Library
College Street, Dublin 2, Ireland
Tel: (353-1) 608 2320.
Fax: (353-1) 608 2690.

Website: Trinity College, Dublin - Official Site

In case you're wondering, one of the major attractions for visitors to this place is the famed Book of Kells which contains a Latin text of the four Gospels (read: The Gospel of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John) decorated by Irish monks in the year 800 AD.

Admission fee to view the Book of Kells costs approx. EUR 5.80 (IEP 4.50). But it's worth every penny of your money. Really.

After you've finished browsing the Book found inside the Treasury Room, please do proceed to the Long Room which boasts of 200,000 of the library's oldest bookin its collection. Guaranteed to amaze you.

While in Trinity College, a visit to The Dublin Experience is also highly recomended. This is a multi-media interpretation of the City of Dublin from its begining to the present day.

(Addmission to The Dublin Experience is IEP 3.00). Now, don't be stingy!

"Malahide Castle"



Welcome to beautiful Malahide Castle, located in the seaside town of Malahide in 250-acres of park land. Did you know that the Castle was both a fortress and private home for nearly 800 years? The Talbot family (who owned this property) used to live here from 1185 to 1973... until the death of the last Lord Talbot. The Castle is the oldest to be continually inhabited by the same family and, apart from a period during which they were evicted by Cromwell, the Talbots lived there until the mid-1970s. It also has the only surviving original medieval great hall hung with an impressive collection of family portraits. It is said that 14 Talbot cousins breakfasted here before riding out to the Battle of the Boyne in 1690, never to return again....

The delightful demesne was created by (Milo) Lord Talbot de Malahide between 1948 and 1973 and contains over 5,000 different species of trees and shrubs.

The Demesne also contains the The Fry Model Railway (another tourist attraction).

(Thanks to the Dublin Tourism Center and its brochures for the above info.)

"Phoenix Park"



No... This isn't the White House.

As a matter of interest, this is the Official Residence of the President of Ireland - Arus an Uachtarain. And the current President so happens to be a dynamic lady too. Girl Power! The mansion is located within the Phoenix Park vicinity and across the street from the US Embassy.

Phoenix Park is probably the largest enclosed park in the whole of Western Europe and is located approximately 4km from Dublin’s city center. The entire park is about 15km in circumference, so be prepared to exercise those leg muscles as you explore the park.

So what is there to see, you asked?

Well, quite a lot actually. Here’s a brief overview of the main sights.

Dublin Zoo

The Dublin Zoo is one of the oldest in the world and is pretty well known for its assistance in the breeding of rare species (no, not the cloning of Dolly, the sheep!). Don't forget to check out the Polar Bear enclosure. Unique feature!

Aras an Uachtaráin

This is Ireland’s answer to the White House, the home and office of the President of Ireland. It can be seen from the main road which runs through the park, and you might just be able to catch a wee glimpse of the President being whisked away to her official duties in the presidential rolls royce (hm..) escorted by a large motorbike cavalcade. By the way, the name is Gaelic. The correct pronounciation is “orras un ookhtarawn", as taught to me by my Irish buddies. It simply means “the president’s building”.

Papal Cross

In 1979, Pope John Paul II became the first Pope EVER to visit Ireland. Over 1.3 million people attended the mass in Phoenix Park. He is THE Pope after all. The large altar and cross used for the mass were left in the park (see pic above) as a reminder of that momentous occasion. Feel free to climb the steps and get a panoramic view of the spot where this massive group of people once gathered.

Ashtown Castle

Today, this castle is a Visitor’s Center. You can watch a video of the history of Phoenix Park and see some great shots (read: photographs) of Irish life over the last century.

The Wellington Monument (pic above) is the second tallest obelisk in the world, after the one in Washington D.C. It is an impressive structure which depicts some of the great battles and conquests of the Duke of Wellington, including the famous victory at Waterloo in 1815.

Above: Here's a glimpse of the main entrance to the US Ambassador's Residence.

Ireland has a long association with the United States, and the U.S. Ambassador has been provided with this magnificent building right in the heart of Phoenix Park and next to the Irish President's official residence. Naturally it’s well guarded... and Osama Bin Laden can forget about coming here. :-))

For more info about the U.S. Ambassador's official residence, take a look at this site:

Embassy of the United States - The Ambassador's Residence, Dublin

Apologies for the badly taken pic. The car jerked... My camera shook. The rest is... well, let's just say that the pic could have turned out much better.....

The Great Courtyard, best known from James Malton’s celebrated view of 1792, contains the principal buildings of the post medieval Castle which formerly housed the vice-regal administration. The modern Conference facilities can be viewed from the Gate of Fortitude. The south range houses the magnificent State Apartments which were built as the residential quarters of the Vicarage court. They are now the venue for Ireland’s Presidencies of the European Community, Presidential Inaugurations and State Functions.

(With special thanks to: http://www.visit.ie for the above info).

Here's more info to help you with the planning.

Opening Hours:
Mon–Fri 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Sat, Sun & Bank Holidays 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Admission Charges:
Adult – £2.00
Child/Student/O.A.P. – £1.00.

How to get there:
Situated off DAME STREET behind City Hall, a 5 minute walk from TRINITY COLLEGE
en route to CHRIST CHURCH.

Buses:
50, 54A, 56A, 77, 77A (Eden Quay).

It's opened throughout the year except 24-26 December and Good Friday. Try not to visit it during a major event e.g. when a famous Head of State from a foreign country visit Dublin... because the State apartments may be closed for state functions!

The Castle is so centrally located, you don't even need to join an excursion tour to come here. After exploring the entire castle, you might just want to drop in to one of the many eateries dotting this area. It's so centrally located, you would be able to find some great eateries... or even drop in to a Rio Coffee outlet for that cuppa cafe latte!

Above & Bottom Two Pics: Beautiful ornate furnishings can be found inside the Castle. Very, very nice.

DUBLIN - The City With A Soul

by Krystynn










One of the most amazing cities that I have had a chance to live in and experience must certainly be DUBLIN.

Dublin is one of Europe’s finest capitals. A unique place steeped in history and buzzing with energy! The City's Medieval, Georgian and modern architecture is definitely a plus-factor. Bounded by the beautiful Dublin Bay and the 2,000 foot Wicklow Mountains, Dublin was the crossroads for four major thoroughfares some 1,500 years ago. The original city walls can still be seen today.... if you really bother to look hard enough. :-) Dublin has indeed gone through a few turbulent ordeals in the past few centuries. The city survived attacks from the Vikings and its subsequent occupation.... as well as Anglo-Norman rule from 1169-1171.

King Henry II of England granted Dublin its first charter in 1171. During the 18th century Dublin was transformed from a struggling trading center to a throbbing city favored by the aristocrats and artistic communities.

Today, this city is a haven for the young and those young-at-heart with a penchant for fun (pub crawling anyone?), history... or even for those interested to check out their Irish roots.

I found out (by accident) that there are currently approx. 40 million Irish Americans living in the U.S.A. Can you imagine if they all decided to return home to Ireland on a particular weekend? Gosh, the city will be flooded!

Currently, the city of Dublin has just over 1 million inhabitants. I won't call it "overly crowded" and is definitely small in comparison to the other European capitals, giving it a quaint atmosphere, and making it easy to travel around. This over 1,000 year old city has splendid public buildings and is particularly rich in domestic architecture (circa. 18th century). Fine Georgian mansions, many of them with historical associations, lend to the beauty of the city’s spacious squares. Most of the major tourist attractions are actually located south of the River Liffey, which unlike most city rivers is quite a rural-looking stream with fish living in it!

I hope you'd enjoy your stay in Dublin just as much as I did.











Above: This is a glimpse of how busy Dublin gets during the Christmas period. The weather for the second half of December is kinda...brrr... chilly. But for the first half of December, the weather is FANTASTIC.

Ladies & Gentlemen, welcome to the beautiful city of Dublin.



Above & Below: Customs House. Designed by Dublin's renowned architect, James Gandon, did you know that this building is over 200 years old?

Don't forget to pop by the historic Customs House located along the tranquil River Liffey (see pic above). This is where I worked (in Dublin). Just behind this landmark building is the Customs House Plaza - IFSC (it stands for International Financial Services Center, I think). I loved working here. But by dusk, this area is secluded (read: dangerous). In the summer of 2002, the Dublin branch of the bank I'm working with will be moving over to Georges Quay, a lovely glass building.






Above: The James Joyce Museum, located in Sandycove, Co. Dublin.

This impressive Joyce Tower is apparently built in such a way that it was able to withstand an invasion by Napoleon Bonaparte. Today, this monument is a museum devoted to the life and works of James Joyce, the writer who brought "Ulysses" to life. It's situated approx. 16 km away from the city of Dublin.... So, it's definitely well worth a visit.



Above: Buskers along the famed Grafton Street, a pedestrianized mall in the city center.

Grafton Street must be my fave hangout. :-) I was here almost daily since my hotel is just round the corner. This is definitely Dublin's equivalent to the world famous Rodeo Drive. High fashion boutiques and trendy shops like Escada, Warehouse, Miss Selfridge etc can be found here.

Fantastic. Fantastic. Fantastic.



Above: More busking along Grafton Street....



Above: A bright red door found along St Stephen's Green, just next to the Le Meridien Shelbourne Hotel.

This is, in my opinion, the most outstanding feature of Dublin. Yes, their colorful doors. This unique feature sure makes this city stand out from all other cities that I've visited thus far. They are so bright and colorful; and can be found at every street corner.

For the really nice doors, I'd highly recommend that you check out those cool Georgian houses along Merrion Square.

Merrion Square itself is a very fine example of Georgian Dublin and a stroll around the square will give you a first hand experience of the famed Doors of Dublin now immortalized in a famous poster of the same name.

A stone's throw away, along Kildare Street, you can catch a glimpse of Dáil Eireann (read: the House of the Irish Parliament). Also on Kildare Street is The National Library which frequently houses art and photographic exhibitions, and the Taylor Galleries of Contempory Modern Art.

Unfortunately, I didn't have much time to visit the museums.... but I passed it almost every other day! Big deal huh?



Above: These doors can be found along Merrion Square....



Above: The world famous Doors of Dublin.



O.K., let's move back to Grafton Street and more interesting sights....



Above and Below: It's Christmas time (2001). Christmas lightings along Grafton Street.





Another highly recommended thing to do is to hop onto one of these horse carriages for a brief tour around the city center. Very nice! Unfortunately, I didn't find enough time to do this. :-( By the time I finish work, it's usually almost time to scoot off to dinner with my buddies. Duh.

You can find many of these horse carriages parked along St Stephen's Green (see pic above).



Above: Molly Malone. No, no, no. Not the one seated! She's the statue pulling that cart! :-)



The Dublin skyline (above) as seen from the Gravity Bar here at the Guinness Storehouse on a bright and clear December morning.



Check out the throngs of people doing their last minute Christmas shopping for the year 2001 (above) on Henry Street. I don't think I dare to mingle with those crowds! I don't wish to get stampeded upon...



Eeks! Just look at the throngs of shoppers (above)! This time it is over at busy, busy, busy Grafton Street on Christmas Eve. Anyone who dares to walk on this stretch of street during this period deserves a medal! :-)) .



Above: O'Connell Street, Dublin's main thoroughfare right here in the city center.



Above: Another look at busy, busy, busy O'Connell Street.



Strolling along the River Liffey here in December can be quite an experience too. Fortunately for me, the weather this particular December (2001) is considered mild. In fact, the Dubliners call it their "warmest" December. :-)

Can you spot the Clarence Hotel (please see pic above and below) owned by the world famous Irish band - U2? No? Squint harder!





The interesting looking building in the distance is the St Stephen's Green Shopping Center (pictured above & below), another favorite haunt of mine. They sell everything in there (well, almost everything).... Don't forget to grab some last minute Irish souvenirs too.

Located just next to the famed Grafton Street.





Oooh, here's the imposing entrance to one of Dublin's famous garden - The Stephen's Green. I'll surely go jogging inside this park in the summer time. I didn't go jogging in winter because the sun rises at 8am - by which time I'm already at the office! Duh. The sun sets at 4.30pm in December. Can you imagine me jogging in the dark? Nah. I'll probably crash headlong into a tree! Not a good idea huh?





Above: The Donovan O'Rossa memorial at the entrance to St Stephen's Green.



One of the two largest cathedrals in Dublin. This is a pic of Christchurch Cathedral (above) located in the city center.



Above: This is the other large cathedral here in Dublin - The St Patrick's Cathedral.



Above: Shaw's Birthplace. A kewl 'lil place.



And finally, Dublin by night can be pretty enchanting too. Here's a pic of the Halfpenny Bridge at nightfall (above). Enjoy the next 2 night shots.......







Above: Ah, the gorgeous Dublin skyline in the distance...


TOURIST ATTRACTIONS





Above: The majestic looking Tower, dating to as far back as 1411... and rebuilt in the late 1770s.

Dublin Castle was founded in 1204 by the order of King John who wanted a fortress constructed for the administration of the city. The castle was placed on high ground to the east of the city and was originally protected by the Poddle river (now found underground) which was later used to fill a moat around the walls.

The original castle is now the Record Tower. Within the complex is the 19th Century Gothic Revival Chapel Royal (restored in 1989), the Great Courtyard, the Gate of Fortitude, the State Apartments and others.

In times past, Dublin Castle was also used as the official residence of the British Viceroys of Ireland, until the Viceregal Lodge was built in Phoenix Park. Today, this historic castle is being used for (mainly) state functions....

How do you get there?

If you walk up to Dame Street, past the Olympia Theater... and voila, to your left is Dublin Castle. It's just a 5-minute walk from Trinity College/ Grafton Street. Very centrally located.





Above & Below: In case some of you need a sitemap... Hope this will do?



The Great Courtyard, best known from James Malton’s celebrated view of 1792, contains the principal buildings of the post medieval Castle which formerly housed the vice-regal administration. The modern Conference facilities can be viewed from the Gate of Fortitude. The south range houses the magnificent State Apartments which were built as the residential quarters of the Vicarage court. They are now the venue for Ireland’s Presidencies of the European Community, Presidential Inaugurations and State Functions.
(With special thanks to: http://www.visit.ie for the above info).



Here's more info to help you with the planning.

Opening Hours:
Mon–Fri 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Sat, Sun & Bank Holidays 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Admission Charges:
Adult – IEP2.00
Child/Student/O.A.P. – IEP1.00.

How to get there:
Situated off DAME STREET behind City Hall, a 5 minute walk from TRINITY COLLEGE
en route to CHRISTCHURCH CATHEDRAL.

It's opened throughout the year except 24-26 December and Good Friday. Try not to visit it during a major event e.g. when a famous Head of State from a foreign country visit Dublin... because the State apartments may be closed for state functions!



The Castle is so centrally located, you don't even need to join an excursion tour to come here. After exploring the entire castle, you might just want to drop in to one of the many eateries dotting this area. It's so centrally located, you would be able to find some great eateries... or even drop in to a Rio Coffee outlet for that cuppa cafe latte!





Above & Bottom Two Pics: Beautiful ornate furnishings can be found inside the Castle. Very, very nice.











If your greatest desire is to drink the best Guinness in the world, then you gotta come to Dublin for sure. Not kidding. I don't know how they brew it but the Guinness found here is definitely the best and purest that I've tasted (not that I'm that great a beer drinker myself).

Anyhow, the Guinness Storehouse is actually a museum (surprise, surprise) dedicated to Ireland's most famous export - yes, Guinness stout.

If you take a tour of this entire museum, you'd discover that Arthur Guinness (founder and inventor of the beer) first began brewing the 'black gold' on this site in 1759.

Now, admission to the Guinness Storehouse is not free of charge but hey, you get to drink a free pint of the magic brew at the end of your self-discovery tour!

Address:

Guinness Storehouse,
St James Gate,
Dublin 8, Ireland

Website: Guinness Storehouse - Official Site

Admission Fee: IEP9 (Euros???). A free pint of Guinness is included.

Happy? :-))



Above: That is moi inside the Guinness Storehouse. No comment about my hair. That's what happens when you don't have enough time to style it.... Oh well.



This is a very interesting bar (above pic). Noticed that long thick pipe hanging across the room? Well, the Guinness beer just so happens to flow through it. A very interesting and unique feature.



If you pop over to the second floor, all your secret questions about Guinness and beer brewing will be answered. Don't forget to check it out.

P.S. Forget about taking the elevator up (the queue is forever loooong). Take the flight of stairs up instead. Much faster. And good for your health too (read: EXERCISE).

Are you ready for a little bit of Guinness history (now don't fall asleep on me!)... The Guinness Brewery has been in operation since 1759 when Arthur Guinness purchased and renovated the 'Rainbow Brewery' and started to brew his prize winning potion which has since become renowned worldwide.

NOBODY comes to Ireland without drinking a pint of Guinness... unless of course if you're a Muslim. It's like visiting New York without seeing the Statue of Liberty or flying in to Beijing without scaling the Great Wall of China! Er... getting the point?



All the different bottles containing Guinness (above) that was ever manufactured and sold since the late 1700s.



Above: That's yours truly livin' it up at the topmost floor of the Guinness Storehouse known simply as the Gravity Bar.

This is where you get your free pint of Guinness and marvel at the 360 degrees panoramic view of the Dublin skyline! Lovely.





Above: Guinness, anyone? :-))



Above: If you're hungry, you can head over to the Brewery Bar for some light sandwiches, soup and a cuppa coffee... or beer!

This is where we had a light lunch. The price is reasonable but the food and service is nothing to rave about. I wouldn't recommend anyone to have a meal here. For drinks only... perhaps.







Calling all geeks (oops!) out there in cyberspace: Don't forget to check out the OLDEST university in Ireland, founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth 1. Trinity College.

Not only is it the oldest university in Ireland, it is also one of the oldest in Europe boasting an impressive list of alumni which includes Samuel Beckett, Jonathan Swift (remember "Gulliver's Travels"?), Bram Stoker (yup, the man who immortalized "Dracula" in novels) and Oscar Wilde amongst others. It used to play a somewhat controversial role in Irish politics and religion (the world's two most taboo topics!). Since and until 1873, only Anglicans could enrol as full members of the University to obtain degrees and scholarships; Catholics were even forbidden to use the library! Don't worry... Things have changed and improved considerably since then.

Today, the University has a strong reputation for excellence in research and scholarship across a wide range of subjects, including technological subjects. Approximately 10,000 students are currently enrolled in the university. Academically renowned, it is definitely on par with Oxford and Cambridge, from which it is modeled.

If you're really interested to study here, the centrally-located college has over 40 departments which offer a wide variety of courses. Facilities include Trinity's historic dining hall (built in 1761... would you believe it?), sports center, health center, chapel etc.

Despite the excellent public transportation system found in Dublin (read: buses and the DART), students tend to get around mostly by bicycle (see pic above).

Just a few steps off campus you will find yourself in the bustling capital city of Dublin.



Trinity College is strategically located right smack in the city center. So, you really have absolutely no excuse not to visit this landmark educational institution. It took me about 5 minutes to walk from St Stephen's Green (where I was staying) to Trinity College via Grafton Street. It's actually located on the tail end of this pedestrianized street where the statue of Molly Malone is found.

Now... there. I've given you the directions to walk there. So... GO!



Above: Statue of my great grandfather. Relax, I'm only kidding...



Above & Below: That is moi. Ahem.



Contact Address:
Trinity College Library
College Street, Dublin 2, Ireland

Website: Trinity College, Dublin - Official Site



In case you're wondering, one of the major attractions for visitors to this place is the famed Book of Kells which contains a Latin text of the four Gospels (read: The Gospel of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John) decorated by Irish monks in the year 800 AD.

Admission fee to view the Book of Kells costs approx. EUR 5.80 (IEP 4.50). But it's worth every penny of your money. Really.

After you've finished browsing the Book found inside the Treasury Room, please do proceed to the Long Room which boasts of 200,000 of the library's oldest books in its collection. Guaranteed to amaze you.

While in Trinity College, a visit to The Dublin Experience is also highly recomended. This is a multi-media interpretation of the City of Dublin from its begining to the present day.

(Addmission to The Dublin Experience is IEP 3.00). Now, don't be stingy!






Phoenix Park



No... This isn't the White House.

As a matter of interest, this is the Official Residence of the President of Ireland - Arus an Uachtarain. And the current President so happens to be a dynamic lady too. Girl Power! The mansion is located within the Phoenix Park vicinity and across the street from the US Embassy.




Phoenix Park is probably the largest enclosed park in the whole of Western Europe and is located approximately 4km from Dublin’s city center. The entire park is about 15km in circumference, so be prepared to exercise those leg muscles as you explore the park.

So what is there to see, you asked?

Well, quite a lot actually. Here’s a brief overview of the main sights.

Dublin Zoo

The Dublin Zoo is one of the oldest in the world and is pretty well known for its assistance in the breeding of rare species (no, not the cloning of Dolly, the sheep!). Don't forget to check out the Polar Bear enclosure. Unique feature!

Aras an Uachtaráin

This is Ireland’s answer to the White House, the home and office of the President of Ireland. It can be seen from the main road which runs through the park, and you might just be able to catch a wee glimpse of the President being whisked away to her official duties in the presidential rolls royce (hm..) escorted by a large motorbike cavalcade. By the way, the name is Gaelic. The correct pronounciation is “orras un ookhtarawn", as taught to me by my Irish buddies. It simply means “the president’s building”.

Papal Cross

In 1979, Pope John Paul II became the first Pope EVER to visit Ireland. Over 1.3 million people attended the mass in Phoenix Park. He is THE Pope after all. The large altar and cross used for the mass were left in the park (see pic above) as a reminder of that momentous occasion. Feel free to climb the steps and get a panoramic view of the spot where this massive group of people once gathered.

Ashtown Castle

Today, this castle is a Visitor’s Center. You can watch a video of the history of Phoenix Park and see some great shots (read: photographs) of Irish life over the last century.



The Wellington Monument (pic above) is the second tallest obelisk in the world, after the one in Washington D.C. It is an impressive structure which depicts some of the great battles and conquests of the Duke of Wellington, including the famous victory at Waterloo in 1815.



Above: Here's a glimpse of the main entrance to the US Ambassador's Residence.

Ireland has a long association with the United States, and the U.S. Ambassador has been provided with this magnificent building right in the heart of Phoenix Park and next to the Irish President's official residence. Naturally it’s well guarded... and Osama Bin Laden can forget about coming here. :-))

For more info about the U.S. Ambassador's official residence, take a look at this site:

Embassy of the United States - The Ambassador's Residence, Dublin

Apologies for the badly taken pic. The car jerked... My camera shook. The rest is... well, let's just say that the pic could have turned out much better.....



MALAHIDE CASTLE



Welcome to beautiful Malahide Castle, located in the seaside town of Malahide in 250-acres of park land. Did you know that the Castle was both a fortress and private home for nearly 800 years? The Talbot family (who owned this property) used to live here from 1185 to 1973... until the death of the last Lord Talbot. The Castle is the oldest to be continually inhabited by the same family and, apart from a period during which they were evicted by Cromwell, the Talbots lived there until the mid-1970s. It also has the only surviving original medieval great hall hung with an impressive collection of family portraits. It is said that 14 Talbot cousins breakfasted here before riding out to the Battle of the Boyne in 1690, never to return again....

The delightful demesne was created by (Milo) Lord Talbot de Malahide between 1948 and 1973 and contains over 5,000 different species of trees and shrubs.

The Demesne also contains the The Fry Model Railway (another tourist attraction).

(Thanks to the Dublin Tourism Center and its brochures for the above info.)









Deluxe Hotels





Above: The lovely 5-star "Le Meridien Shelbourne Hotel" located along St Stephen's Green.
A charming victorian hotel.

Initially, I was supposed to be booked into the Westbury Hotel. But the hotel was COMPLETELY booked for the period I was supposed to be in Dublin. So, I was given another option - which proved to be a much better choice than the Westbury. Yes, The Le Meridien Shelbourne Hotel.



I love this grand Victorian hotel. The Shelbourne is known to be one of Europe’s grand old luxurious hotels... furnished with antiques in a luxurious decor. This hotel was chosen as the location for the drafting of the Irish Constitution in 1922. You can even view the room that hosted this momentous event if you're a guest of Shelbourne. Spectacular views of St. Stephen's Green can also be seen from the hotel's superb suites (Pierce Brosnan stayed at the Princess Grace suite on the second floor). My room? Because I was a long staying guest, they upgraded me to a more spacious room (read: not a suite... so sad!) overlooking beautiful St Stephen's Green. So, no complains from me there. Their world famous pub is also the watering hole for celebs like Bono (from U2) to hang out. Famous celebs who have stayed here recently included: Kylie Minogue, Kevin Costner, Sean Connery and Pierce Brosnan etc.

Pierce Brosnan (aka James Bond - my favorite Bond) was also staying at the hotel - the same period as I was (first week of December 2001). Needless to add, I was soooo excited (read: heart palpitating, pulse racing) when I found out that he had checked in to the hotel for 2 nights and was staying on the 2nd floor, one floor below mine (I was on the 3rd floor). C'mon, this is THE James Bond after all! Which gal won't swoon?? However, because most of the guests at this hotel acted sooo cool in his presence, I had no choice (ugh!) but to contain my excitement and try not to look like some screaming teenager at a Britney Spears concert. Or worse still, come across as a country bumpkin (heavens no!). I mean, NOBODY asked for his autograph or took his pics! Anyway, even if they'd wanted, they can't. Pierce Brosnan had a strict NO PHOTOGRAPHS please ruling when he was staying at the hotel. Oh well.



My bedroom on the third floor (for several weeks)....



Above: Me at the gorgeous lobby... on my way to work in the early morning.

Below: Another look at the enchanting Victorian lobby... complete with a fireplace (albeit a fake one).







Above: The fabulous world famous Lord Mayor Lounge where the who's-who of Dublin high society congregate to gossip (aha!) over high tea.



Even the elevator lobby (above) with the gaily decorated Christmas tree oozes old world charm



The Shelbourne Club, a fitness/gym club for hotel guests and members. Very nice and impressive gym with a huge indoor swimming pool and state-of-the-art gym equipment.

This is the place I head to either extremely early in the mornings (6.30am) or at night (6pm) just before dashing off into the night for dinner with my buddies.

I'll DEFINITELY miss this club!








This amazing 5-star deluxe hotel - The Westbury Hotel boasts of an extremely central location right smack on Grafton Street, Dublin's answer to Beverly Hills' Rodeo Drive (in the USA).

My friends/colleagues who arrived a week before me managed to get rooms at this hotel (corporate rate: EUR 190++ incl. of Continental breakfast). However, one week later (when I was due to be in Dublin), the hotel is fully occupied. They simply couldn't accommodate even one more booking. :-(

The Westbury Hotel
Grafton Street,
Dublin 2, Ireland.
Tel: +353-1-679 1122
Fax: +353-1-679 7078

Above: A pic of the Westbury Hotel taken from their official website. Once my last roll of film is developed, I'll pic up my own personal pic that I took of this hotel....



Hostels/ Bed & Breakfast



For the budget minded traveler, fear not! I found some really good hostels + bed and breakfast joints during my time in Dublin.

Most of the hostels and Bed & Breakfast joints can be found along O'Connell Street (see pic above). 'Tis an extremely busy street.... and it can get quite dangerous at night (some sections of this area). If you value a more tranquil setting, I'd suggest that you choose bed & breakfast joints in the Ballsbridge area. My office has a branch in Ballsbridge so I had the opportunity to explore this part of Dublin. Nice and quiet area. Definitely non-threatening i.e. no muggers.

Alot of Dubliners have told me that The Ariel Guest House is definitely Dublin’s finest Bed & Breakfast place. So, you may wish to take note of this. This centrally located immaculate Victorian mansion was built sometime in the 1800s for a wealthy merchant. Quiet luxury and elegant decor can be found in the 28 en suite rooms and what's more, a full Irish breakfast is served in the Victorian dining room. I'm beginning to fall in love with this place just by hearing about it!


RESTAURANTS



You can't believe how many great restaurants I discovered (most of them 'by chance'). So, here's a list of my favorites...for now.

For Chinese cuisine:

Try Imperial Restaurant, located along one of the side streets along Grafton Street. A stone's throw away from the lovely 5-star Westbury Hotel. The food here is as good as those found in Hongkong. I'd highly recommend this place. The restaurant is open from 12.30pm to 12 midnight. You can also try their delicious Dim Sum. Beware of long queues if you're coming during the peak lunch/dinner hours.

Another Chinese restaurant I'd recommend is the Kingsland Restaurant (see pic below). It's just a stone's throw away from the Dublin Castle, one of the city's historic landmark.

For Italian cuisine:

Alot of people recommended me to try out the delicious food at Pasta Fresca restaurant. So, I just HAD to have a meal here, which I did. Located just around the corner from the Westbury Hotel, this AMAZING Italian restaurant serves one of the most appetizing Lasagne I've ever tasted. The crowds lining up to dine in at this eaterie is legendary. But it's well worth the wait, trust me.

For Irish/International cuisine:

Definitely, Rubicon's (along Merrion Row) and just a stroll away from my hotel, The Le Meridien Shelbourne.

Another fave of mine: Cooper's located along Baggot Street. That's where we all went for our pre-Christmas Eve celebration dinner. Food is yummy... and the service here is impeccable. What more can we ask for?



And now, here are my personal views on some of the eateries that we've patronized:



O.K., I've had quite a handful of people telling me to check out Bewley's Cafe (pic above), apparently a pretty famous joint for drinks and meals. I did just that. I dragged my other half to the outlet on Grafton Street for a memorable meal. It's no big deal if you ask me. Even the coffee served here is considered too mild and too blend for me.

Would I recommend anyone to dine here? Yes and No.

Yes - if you're on a tight budget.

No - If you can afford to go somewhere better. And there are other better places just around the vicinity.



Alot of people also recommended me to check out this Italian eaterie - Pasta Fresca located along busy Grafton Street. And I must be the most obedient person in town too.... I took all these recommendations to heart and decided to check out each and every recommendation. You see, I DO have lots of time on my hands. :-) Besides, all my expenses are being picked up by the bank I'm working in.

We headed for this eaterie one Sunday afternoon for lunch and never looked back since. The food is FANTASTIC. Their Italian coffee = superb. The cost of an entire meal? Very reasonable. Believe it or not, you can actually get a set meal for IEP10! This is DEFINITELY one place I'd recommend EVERYONE and ANYONE who's in Dublin and... craving for some fine Italian cuisine.



Enough said about restaurants. Let's move on to...

The Irish Diet :-))

Irish Stew. I thought it'd turn out looking like some Hungarian Goulash... but alas, it wasn't to be so. (P.S. I'm a real country bumpkin huh?). Well, the real dish consists of mutton, potatoes, onions and flavored with paisley + thyme. My personal opinion? I still think Hungarian Goulash tastes much better. This dish seems pretty "normal" to me. Very soupy. Had this dish at the Shelbourne Hotel (No. 27 Restaurant).

Guinness Cake. A very unique fruit cake... baked with a tinge of Guinness beer inside!

Soda Bread. An interesting white and brown bread... Tastes great!

Bacon & Cabbage. A typically traditional Irish dish. I like this dish.




And here's a list of my favorite restaurants in Dublin. Those eateries that I don't really fancy, I've left them out of the list below.

I hope it'd be of some help to you....

Restaurants

Rubicon.
6 Merrion Row, Dublin 2
Tel: 353-1-676 5955
Type: Irish/Seafood
Price: Expensive (EUR 20 onwards)
Note: A top class restaurant serving traditional Irish cuisine and seafood. Their wine list is also impressive. Just a walk away from the famed Shelbourne Hotel.

The Side Door
The Shelbourne Hotel, 27 St Stephen's Green, Dublin 2.
Tel: 353-1-676 6471
Type: Internatinational/Irish
Price: Moderately Expensive (from EUR 12 for a meal)
Note: A bistro/ Californian-style restaurant located inside the Shelbourne Hotel serving delicious sandwiches. Very nice decor. Prices of food not cheap though....

Brownes Brasserie
22 St Stephen's Green, Dublin 2
Tel: 353-1- 638 3939
Type: French
Price: Expensive (from EUR 15 onwards)
Note: A really trendy restaurant located in a beautiful Georgian townhouse, a stone's throw away from busy Grafton Street and the Shelbourne Hotel. Across the street is the famed St Stephen's Green Park. It's THE place to go to if you want to splurge a little in a really nice restaurant.

Belgo Dublin
17-19 Sycamore Street, Temple Bar, Dublin 2
Type: European/Belgian
Price: Inexpensive (approx. EUR 10 onwards)
Note: There is a similar chain in England (I think it's owned by the same people). Anyhow, this is the place to go to if you like mussels and beer. This restaurant serves quite alot of Belgian dishes and beers. Great food and good value for money. I mean, where else can you expect to pay only IEP 5 for a set meal?

Bangkok Cafe
106 Parnell Street, Dublin 1
Type: Thai/Seafood
Price: Inexpensive (can find meals below EUR 10).
Note: This is a VERY popular restaurant here in Dublin. The delicious Thai food and price(s) certainly make up for the lacklustre decor. But hey... who cares, right? When there's good food, anything goes for me! This restaurant is NOT opened for lunch.

No 27 The Green
The Shelbourne Hotel, 27 St Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2
Phone: 6762727
Type: Breakfast/International
Price: Expensive (EUR 20 and above)
Note: An elegant + stylish restaurant located in the Shelbourne Hotel overlooking St Stephen’s Green. The food here is excellent; the service impeccable. This is where I have my early morning traditional Irish breakfasts and some late-night dinners. Love this place!

Imperial Restaurant
13 Wicklow Street, Dublin 2
Type: Chinese
Price: Expensive (EUR 20 and above)
Note: Located just off Grafton Street and stone's throw away from the Westbury Hotel. This is one of the BEST Chinese restaurants I've eaten in outside of Singapore and Hongkong! I am so impressed by the quality of the food. Prices are not cheap though... and the service is...er... well, let's just say that the waiters & waitresses should be trained to smile more and frown lesser. If it's not for the great food served here, I don't think I'll bother to patronize this place. There's always a long queue so if you're serious about coming, try to come slightly before dinner time to guarantee yourself a table! Not kidding.

Pasta Fresca
3-4 Chatham Street, Dublin 2
Type: Italian
Price: Moderately Expensive
Note: Located just next to the Westbury Hotel, this must surely be the best Italian restaurant I've been to in Dublin. Always crowded. So you gotta have lots of patience and wait to be seated. Lots of hip and trendy folks can be spotted here (quite alot of Italians living in Dublin come here... You can hear them chatter excitedly in Italian!). Lots of business people dine here too. Their set meals are a real steal starting from as low as IEP 9 per set lunch. Amazing. Their cuppuccino is also fantastic. I'll give this restaurant 10/10 for quality of food, price, decor and location. Perfect.

Kingsland Chinese Restaurant
15 Dame Street, Dublin 2
Type: Chinese
Price: Moderately Expensive (EUR 15 and above)
Note: Very delicious food served here in a central location (just a walk away from the Dublin Castle!). Value for money.

Coopers
62 Lower Lesson Street, Dublin 2 (just off St Stephen's Green)
Type: International/Mediterranean
Price: Expensive. EUR 20 and above
Note: This was where we had our pre-Christmas Eve dinner. Service is first class. Food is great too. And the atmosphere spells old world charm. Very nice place. I'd highly recommend this restaurant if you wish to live it up a little here in Dublin!

The Harbour Master
Old Dock Offices, Customs House Dock, IFSC, Dublin 1
Type: Irish
Price: Moderately Expensive (EUR 20 and above)
Note: This is THE place to go to if you wish to rub shoulders with bankers, traders, brokers etc. Just across the river and a 2-minute walk from Customs House Plaza, this place serves FANTASTIC food in a nice setting. You can choose to be seated either in the restaurant area or in the pub. Either way, you pay the same price for the food. Service is quick and efficient. This is where I head to for lunch almost every other day with my colleagues (if I happen to be at the IFSC). My favorite dish? Fish with mash potatoes. Yummy! In the evenings, this place (pub) is packed with people trying to hang loose after a hard day's work. My personal favorite place for lunch. Highly, highly recommended!


Wrights Fisherman's Wharf
IFSC Customs House Docks, Dublin 1
Type: International/Seafood
Price: Expensive! (EUR 30 and above)
Note: This is another highly recommended place to come for lunch - if you happen to be in the vicinity. Cool ambience and first class service. If it weren't for the fact that everything costs a bomb here, I'll probably be lunching here every other day too!


** A special thanks goes to the Concierge team at The Shelbourne Hotel for recommending me 80% of the restaurants listed above. Of all the hotels I've stayed in all over the world, The Shelbourne Hotel indeed have the BEST Concierge team! A special thanks to Stephen (who's worked in the hotel for 23 years!) for being so attentive and taking such good care of me when I was a guest of the hotel.


NIGHTLIFE



Above: Let's get ready to rumble...er, I mean, PARTY!

Wow, where do I start?

I think we spent more time visiting all the pubs and eateries here in Dublin vs sightseeing! Let me start the ball rolling by naming my favorite haunts.

Pubs: Here's a list of some of my favorite pubs... topping the list is of course...

Doheny & Nesbit
5 Baggot Street, Lower Dublin.
Note: It's just across the street from Ely Place... a stone's throw away from the Shelbourne Hotel. A lively and merry 'lil pub which is forever
crowded. Friendly people with reasonably priced drinks.

Zanzibar
35 Lower Ormond Quay, Dublin.
Note: Highly recommended by a few VTers... Paid a visit to this pub. No regrets. Lively atmosphere + nice crowd. Check it out!

O'Donoghue's
15 Merrion Row, Dublin.
Note: Another great pub right smack in the city center. Great crowd too. :-)

International Bar
St Andrew Street, Dublin.
Note: Great pub. Great location (just off Grafton Street; near Wicklow Street). Great international crowd. What more can we ask for?


And lastly, for a real unique experience, try Messers Maguire, a microbrewery - a place where they brew their own beer. Address: Burgh Quay. I don't have the complete address but if you were to ask the cab driver, he should know. This place is HOT, HOT, HOT (read: popular watering hole).



CHEERS to everyone! Merry Christmas too!



Above: My crazy friends. The guy with the cigarette (Derek) is really very much better looking in real life. He has all these women falling at his feet all the time. Amazing. Now, Derek... do I get that free cuppa coffee now?



Definitely the coolest gang in town (pic above)... My wonderful colleagues and friends here at Cooper's Restaurant on Baggot Street celebrating our pre-Christmas Eve dinner.

This isn't the entire team by the way. We had to split up into different tables. The best part of this gathering? We could bring our partners along - at the bank's expense (read: Oooh, I just love my big bosses). :-D



Nope, those guys aren't deformed. (Sorry, Derek & Alan!). Actually, this is what happens when a person has too much to drink. :-)) (See pic above).

TRANSPORTATION



Dublin's traffic is... well, legendary. Let's just say that it's like being stuck in a traffic jam in Los Angelos (USA). :-) I'm sure you're getting the picture now.

Trying to hail a cab on the streets of Dublin may also frustrate you. So, how did I cope with the not-too-good traffic situation + lack of cabs on the streets? I literally memorized the phone numbers of 3 major cab companies here in Dublin. No choice. When you have to rush from one meeting to another, you can forget about calling for a cab at the last minute. Unlike Singapore, London or LA, the earliest they'd arrive at your destination is one hour. There were several occasions when I had to wait for MORE THAN ONE HOUR for a cab to pick me up from the IFSC/Customs House Plaza back to my hotel at the Shelbourne. I almost tore at the cab driver's hair when he FINALLY arrived. Oh well, I didn't mean to sound that violent. Next time, I'll try walking back to my hotel. People tell me it'd take about 30 minutes to walk from Customs House Plaza to Grafton Street (assuming I don't get lost or kidnapped along the way). :-)

After living in Dublin for the first 2 weeks, I kinda got into the groove of things and anticipated pretty well how to get from one place to another without having to wait for one whole hour. :-) That was when I really started to enjoy this beautiful city.



Above: Dublin International Airport. At Christmas time.



Above: The lovely British Midlands (BMI) Airline Business Class Lounge here in Dublin. It looks EXACTLY the same in every city that BMI flies to.


CULTURAL TIPS



Above Pic: Dublin's most prestigious departmental store - BROWN THOMAS. My fave place to window-shop.

Let's spend some time now and talk about every woman's favorite topic - SHOPPING. Well, almost every woman. :-)

The main shopping areas here in Dublin include Nassau Street, Grafton Street, St. Stephen's Green, Temple Bar, O'Connell Street and Henry Street. Most of the big-name department stores are located on Grafton Street - Brown Thomas and Marks & Spencers. For the budget conscious, there is Clery's on O'Connell Street.

Huge shopping malls include the St. Stephen's Green Shopping Center... a bright and spacious shopping area where you can buy just about anything and also have a meal. Incidentally, it is the largest shopping mall in the city and can get very crowded, especially in summer and on weekends (even in winter). The Powerscourt Townhouse on Clarendon Street (follow the sign on Grafton street!) specializes in wonderful restaurants, cafes, crafts, jewellery and clothes stores.

Opening hours of most stores vary considerably, with some sandwich bars opening well before 9am and other stores just starting to get going by 9.30am. Most are closed by 6pm... but on Thursdays, there is late night shopping until 9pm. Shops are opened for business on Sundays from 12 noon to 6pm.

If you're NOT a resident of the European Union (EU), you are entitled to a VAT (sales tax) refund of up to 20% (I think) of your purchase(s). Just remember to submit all the necessary documents when you leave Dublin or any EU cities. I got my money back on the spot at the airport in the currency I wanted (Sterling Pounds). So for folks like us (outside the EU), it is VERY worth it to shop up a storm... which I did! :-))



Photo Above: That is yours truly at the office with my very good buddy + colleague, Elisa B. (an Italian gal residing in Dublin).
Elisa, you're the best!



Above & Below: The Victory Christian Fellowship on Westland Row, right smack in the city center. In Dublin, this was the church we attended, highly recommended to us by the Kenneth Copeland Ministry. It's a vibrant Pentecostal church and nothing like the church I grew up with i.e. Church of England where solemn worship services are the norm. Think: Sister Act and you'd get what I mean. This is an international church where you'd meet expats from all over the world who are currently based in Dublin. There are quite a handful of them from the different African countries, South Africa and other parts of the world. Lots of locals too (Dubliners)...

If you are in Dublin for Christmas, you may wish to check out Christchurch Cathedral who has a candlelight service + a pretty impressive choir singing Christmas carols.



......................................................



Above: Dublin Bay (above) is a mere short drive away from the city center.
In other words - don't miss it.



Above: This is a pic of King John's Castle in the village of Trim which was used in the Oscar winning movie "Braveheart".


"Travel is more than the seeing of sights; it is a change that goes on, deep and permanent in the ideas of living." - Miriam Beard b. 1901

Photos

St. Michan’s Church, the cryptSt. Michan’s Church, the crypt

The Temple Bar pubThe Temple Bar pub

O'Neill's PubO'Neill's Pub

Good luck will rub off on you :)Good luck will rub off on you :)

Forum Posts

IMI Residence

by CheetahChiq78

My brother is traveling to Dublin in January for his honeymoon. I've been looking for hotels and have narrowed it down to a few. Has anybody stayed at either:

-IMI Residence
Sandyford Road
Dublin, 16
Ireland

**OR**

-Mespil Hotel
50-60 Mespil Road
Dublin,
Ireland

If you HAVE stayed at either of these, would you recommend staying here? My brother is 22 and his wife is 18. Is it a nice area? It doesn't matter if they're by a lot of pubs. Just in an "interesting" area.

Thanks in advance for your help!!

Re: IMI Residence

by donalh

Definitely the Mespil Hotel - nice hotel in a great location. IMI is way too far out.

Re: Re: IMI Residence

by CheetahChiq78

Thanks SO much for the info!!!! It's greatly appreciated!!!! I feel MUCH better getting real people's opinions! :-d

Re: IMI Residence

by CiaranD

yes Ive stayed in the Mespil Hotel, it is the ideal base for a stay in Dublin. Its only a 10 minute walk from the main shopping area. Plus there are loads of nice bars and restaurants right beside it on Baggot Street. I think they have also recently redecorated the hotel as well!!

Hotels in Dublin

by kmuffle

I am coming to Dublin for the weekend in October and would like a nice hotel that is not in the city centre, but has easy access to the city via train.

It's not that I don't want to stay in the city just don't want to pay the prices and would rather stay a little further out in a nice hotel at a better price than in the city in a townhouse B & B for the same or more money.

I am quite happy to travel around 30 minutes via train, but wouuld like it not to far walk from a station on the line into the city.

Re: Hotels in Dublin

by Ruai

Bewleys Leopardstown is a little over 20 minutes from the city centre by Luas tram. They have a standard price of 89 euro and the aircoach bus from the airport has its last stop there.

Re: Hotels in Dublin

by swansy

the IMI residence in Dundrum is very good budget accommodation and is also on the LUAS line and very close to Dundrum Shopping Centre - biggest in Dublin. another suggestion would be any of the Travelodge hotels in Dublin, the one in rathmines for example is within walking distance of the city centre. you can book these on www.roomex.com - hope this helps

Re: Hotels in Dublin

by 2me

Hi!

I made a quite neat survey on the prices and I suggest this (Ripley Court Hotel Dublin ***)
http://www.ripleycourt.com/

Not only it is at the center of the city but the rate is reasonable too, Euro 50 per night (inc breakfast) if booked two nights or more.

Cheers.

Re: Hotels in Dublin

by szwandtkj

we`ve just stayed in the travelodge in rathmines. It is not on a train line but there are several buses into town from outside the hotel door, the cost is €1.40

Re: Hotels in Dublin

by 2me

Thanks Karen for the info. That was indeed a great deal :)
Cheers

transfer

by cherylcullen

i would like to ask if anyone has travelled from dublin airport to the IMI residence sandyford rd and if so what bus do you get and what are the costs

Re: transfer

by tango_jd

I think Aircoach would be the best - try here:
http://www.aircoach.ie/table.routes.leopardstown.php

We used it for the city centre but there are several different services - one to Leapardstown looks a likely option.

Re: transfer

by Waoife

The following is from the IMI's own website:

"LUAS
Balally stop, 1km from IMI. On exiting the LUAS plaza onto Sandyford Road, turn left. IMI is a brisk 10-minute uphill walk, set in its own grounds on the right hand side.The entrance is on Clonard Road, joining Sandyford Road at traffic lights.

BUSES
44, 44B, 116, 48A (To Dundrum only)"

Based on this you could take the aircoach to Leopardstown and then get the Luas (tram) to Balally.

Alternatively, the cheapest option would be to take a regular Dublin Bus (Dublinbus.ie) into the city centre and then take one of the buses recommended above from there.

Re: transfer

by tony2phones

In respect of the IMI I don't put them into my equations any more for only one reason if they double book as they have done for 2 of my 5 bookings they send you to the Bewley’s Hotel Leopardstown which is the only place in the world that I would never go to again, unless they remove all the benches from every street in Dublin.

Travel Tips for Dublin

Beyond the surface

by acemj

If you're not familiar with Dublin, you might look at this picture and think it's out in the country at some distant castle. However, Dublin Castle is actually right in the middle of one of the busiest parts of the city and is a nice diversion from the busy city streets.

Details of the Lever Building

by Kentbein

The Lever Building, also known as "Sunlight Chambers", was designed as Dublin offices for Lord Lever (of Lever Brothers), by a Liverpool architect named Edward Ould. He designed another builindg called "Port Sunlight", so there's something important about "Sunlight" in the development during the years of this building's contruction. I'll have to investigate.

It was designed in the "romantic Italianate" style. It has wide overhanging eaves, a tiled roof, and an arcaded at the upper floors. It has a unique architectural feature in Dublin architecture, two multicoloured terracotta friezes which depict the history of hygiene.

Until recently these friezes were filthy from car and peat soot but a recent restoration restored the friezes to their multicoloured brilliance.

By the way, the Liffey River photograph, shown along the Ormand Quay in my first series of photos, shows the Lever Building if you want to re-position yourself in relation to the river. It's the yellowish building almost mid page just alongside the Essex Bridge.

Along Lord Edwards Street

by Kentbein

We stopped at this Irish Celtic Craftshop along Lord Edwards Street enroute to Christchurch. I think it's one of the nicer shops like this in Dublin and recommend it for picking up presents for friends and family when you return home. The owner is a very nice guy, easy to talk with and hires equally nice staff. There's not a lot of room between the diplays and can be a tight squeeze sometimes, but everyone there's in a good mood , so as the Australians say, "no worries'.

I'm not sure if this is a one of a kind shop in Dublin or if it's like it's competion, Carroll's, which seems to be a chain of stores in Dublin and maybe throughout other cities in Ireland. The Irish Celtic Craftshop has by far a nicer feel though, so be sure to stop by this shop while there. Carroll's isn't bad -Lochlainn would disagree because it's a chain- but Carroll's doesn't have the personal feel of the Irish Celtic shop. Both have nice Irish gifts.

I like to buy bottle openers from the different cities I visit. They're small, easy to carry, and something that can actually be used. (Feel free to send me some!! :) I love to lay them out by the beer at my backyard parties. Ireland has some very nice brass ones, so I stocked up on a dozen for myself and friends. The Irish Celtic Craftshop and the Dublin Castle had the best I found in town. Carroll's weren't as good quality.

Comments

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 IMI Residence Dublin

We've found that other people looking for this hotel also know it by these names:

Imi Residence Hotel Dublin
Dublin Imi Residence Hotel
Imi Residence Dublin Hotel Dublin

Address: Sandyford Rd, Dublin, County Dublin, Ireland