Lord Edward

The Square, Silken Thomas complex, Kildare Town, Ireland

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Lord Edward
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94%

Satisfaction Excellent
Excellent
58%
45
Very Good
29%
23
Average
9%
7
Poor
2%
2
Terrible
1%
1

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  • Families100
  • Couples70
  • Solo100
  • Business66

More about Kildare

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Walk down Tully Walk to see the mares and foals.Walk down Tully Walk to see the mares and foals.

Mares and FoalsMares and Foals

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Travel Tips for Kildare

Home of Irish Racehorse Breeding Business

by challenger

Kildare is the home of the Irish racehorse breeding business. It therefore comes as no surprise that the one absolute Must See in the area is the National Irish Stud that can be located about a mile or so outside Kildare. Just follow the signposts.

It is very well worth a visit and the entrance fee also includes a visit to the Japanese Gardens and St Fiachra’s Garden.

Then go, visit one of the races on the Curragh Race Track and have a flutter. All Irish dailies will have details of the next schedule.

Irish National Stud

by challenger

Irish National Stud and Japanese Gardens, Tully, Kildare.
Ph: +353-45-521617 Fax: +353-45-522964
e-mail: stud@irish-national-stud.ie
web site: www.irish-national-stud.ie

The Irish National Stud belongs to the State and – not being private - hosts very affordable breeding opportunities for horse owners. Visitors get regular guided tours through the stables, learn all about horse breeding – and believe me: more than you probably want to know :-) – and can also visit a race horse museum on the grounds that also exhibits the skeleton of famous Irish Grand National winner Arkle.

Japanese Gardens

by challenger

Prior to being a State owned Stud Farm, the property in the early part of the 20th century belonged to Colonel William Hall-Walker who had turned to horse breeding as a hobby. Often being described as eccentric, he also decided to establish a Japanese Garden on its ground.

These gardens are quite fascinating. Through its flowers, bushes and trees they tell the individual’s story and learning experience from birth to death. Stages in it include the CAVE OF BIRTH, the TUNNEL OF IGNORANCE, the HILL OF LEARNING, the ENGAGEMENT BRIDGE (Bachelors Beware!), the HILL OF AMBITION, the CHAIR OF OLD AGE and finally the GATEWAY TO ETERNITY.

It’s a fun walk around and highly recommended! Very Zen, y’know?

St Fiachra's Garden

by challenger

The last addition to the Irish National Stud complex is St Fiachra’s Garden. After oh so many queries from visitors as to why there was a Japanese Garden on the grounds, but no Irish Garden, the situation was remedied just recently.

The garden is dedicated to St Fiachra, patron saint of gardeners, and only has native Irish flora. The centre of it is the breathtakingly beautiful Waterford Crystal Garden, probably the most expensive piece of “garden” you are likely to find anywhere.

The History of Kildare

by leafmcgowan

"About Kildare"

The visit I took in July to Kildare was one of the most sacred pilgrimmages I've made in my life. The Goddess Brigid has been my Matron and principle Deity since 1990 (20 years). I sought out Brighid's flame, her holy wells, and to see the town that centers around the belief of this ancient Goddess and now Catholic Saint. "Kildare" is also known as "Cill Dara". It is one of the oldest towns in Ireland. It originated in pre-Christian times with a shrine to the Celtic Goddess Brigid. After Christianization, it became the site of the great Christian foundation of St. Brigid. The town and area is full of legends, lore, historic buildings, and ruins dating well over 1500 years. Kildare was a town even before the Vikings colonized the coast and building towns, as even though towns are believed not to have existed prior to the Vikings. We know that Kildare fit the definition of a town as Cogitosus, a 7th century monk from Kildare, described it as a "vast metropolitan city" with a street of stone steps and urban characteristics existing before the Vikings arrived in Ireland. It is on these facets alone that it can claim to be the oldest town in Ireland. Kildare owes its existence to St. Brigid who founded her monastery here in the late 5th century C.E (484). There is evidence of older Pagan shrines to the Celtic Goddess Brigid that were served by a group of young women who tended a perpetual fire that was kept alit here. Brigid was the Goddess of ars, poetry, healing, childbirh, magic, livestock, and the yield of the Earth. The earliest shrine is believed to have been built over by St. Brigid's Cathedral and may have been associated with a particular sacred oak tree growing on the site. Some believe that the Christian St. Brigid was a convert from the Pagan women who tended the Pagan Shrine to the Goddess Brigid. Regardless of the roots, by the 5th century, a unique Christian foundation was established by St. Brigid. She chose a site at the ancient shrine, under a large oak tree, on the ridge of Drum Criadh (Ridge of Clay) and built her church. Its foundation was renamed Cill Dara (The Church of the Oak) which is where the modern name Kildare comes from. St. Conleth, another Saint popular in the area, died in 520 C.E. Brigid's Shrine was erected by 523 C.E. St. Brigid passed away at age 70 in 528 C.E.

"History"

Kildare flourished from the early 7th century to this day. It became a grand center of learning and a school was established for students from abroad as well as the sons of the Gaelic nobility. As the foundation grew, the requirement for artisans, traders, and tillers of the soil increased until Kildare reached a proto-town status. Kildare and its political / secular powers were watched very closely by the local kings of Leinster who were based in the nearby town of Naas. There is mention in the Annals that in 710 C.E. the monastery was burned. In 756 the Bishop Eghtigin was killed by a priest at St. Brigid's altar in Kildare as he was celebrating mass which at that time was forbidden for a priest to do in the presence of a Bishop. The Annals mention the building of a wooden church in 762 but by 770 Kildare and the monastery was burnt down again. By 772 it was burnt again on the 4th of Ides of June and again in 774. By 799 St. Conleth was placed in a shrine of gold and silver.
The Annals of Ireland referred to Kildare alot especially from the 9th-11th centuries in relation to raids and plunderings of Vikings and the Native Irish. They recorded that in 835 C.E. a Danish flet of 30 ships arrived in Liffey and another in the Boyne where they plundered every church and abbey in the region and destroyed Kildare with fire and sword carrying off the shrines of St. Brigid and St. Conleth. However the Brigidine order had removed the remains of St. Brigid and hid them in Downpatrick before her shrine was destroyed. In 868, Queen Flanna, wife of Finliath, the King of Ireland, rebuilt the Church. In 883, Ceallach Mac Bran, the King of Leinster gained a battle over Kildare in their church and slayed many in the churchyard. The same year the Danes laid spoil upon Kildare, its religious houses, and took the abbot and 280 of his clergy plus family captive. By 895 the Danish raided Kildare again. In 926 Kildare was ransacked by the son of Godfrey of Waterford and again by the Danes of Dublin in the same year carrying away numerous captives and rich booty. They ransacked Kildare again in 953. By 962 Kildare was almost completely destroyed by the Danes of Dublin and most of Kildare's inhabitants were made slaves, yet the Collegiate School of Kildare continued teaching and the professors remained in residence. In 992 Kildare was yet, once again, destroyed and preyed upon by the Danes of Dublin. They plundered it again in 998 and 1012. In 1013 the Danes burnt Kildare down to the ground. In 1016 It was again plundered by the Danes. In 1018 it was recorded that all of Kildare except one house was consumed by lightning. According to the Annals, the Monastery was burnt through the negligence of a very bad woman. In 1040 Kildare was destroyed by fire. By 1050 Kildare and its great stone church was burnt down again and again in 1079. In 1089 the town was destroyed by fire. In 1135 the Abbess was forced from her cloister by Dermot McMurrough and made to marry one of his followers. In the course of that event, approximately 170 of Kildare's inhabitants were slaughtered.

"Medieval to Present Day"

After the Normans landed in 1169, they came to Kildare with Strongbow using it for the center of his campaign to conquer Leinster. Giraldus Cambrensis, the Welsh chronicler of the Norman Invasion recorded his impressions of Kildare, its round tower, its marvelous manuscripts, and the Legends of St. Brigid. It was also here the very first mention of a castle in Kildare which was probabl a motte and bailey castle. The first stone castle to be built was done by the Earl Marshal on the site of the present castle in the early 13th century. Strongbow died in 1176 and by 1189 his daughter and her husband William Marshal Snr inherited Kildare castle. In 1295 John Fitzthomas quarrelled with Richard de Burgh, earl of Ulster causing unrest in Kildare. Calbach O Conchobair Failge captured the castle and burnt many of its documents, the followers of William Donyn broke into the castle and robbed it of money, cloth, wheat, oats, malt, oxen, cows, sheep, and pigs. In 1297 William de Vescy surrendered the castle to the king. The same year, Walter, son of Nicholas the chaplain, broke into the Cathedral and stole treasures from the Church. In 1032 the Inquisition claimed the Bishop of Kildare built the Castle of Kildare on church lands without permission. The Castle was sieged in 1315/1316 by Edward Bruce after a 3 day siege. Kildare and the region, being on the frontier lands of the Pale, were centrally attacked not only through history by the Vikings but dispossessed native Irish. The town went into the possession of the Fitzgerland family and by the Confederate Wars in the 1640s was garrisoned and the Cathedral stood in ruins. At this time Kildare was believed to have been abandoned and no longer inhabited. By 1798 Kildare got involved in the Rebellion and was where Lord Edward Fitzgerald, leader of the Rebellion, lived and some 350 men were massacred in Gibbet Rath when they were trying to surrender. The Jockey Club was founded in the 1700s and brought in horse training stables at the nearby Curraugh adding prosperity to the town and region with horse racing. By the 1800s the British Army artillery barracks were strongly rooted in the area and the Curraugh. With ease of access to Dublin by road and rail it became a dormitory town of Dublin and also declared a Heritage Town. Kildare's major attractions are St. Brigid, her Cathedral, her wells, her flame, the Irish National Stud and Horse Museum, The Japanese Gardens and Visitor Center, and the Round Tower.

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Lord Edward

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The Square, Silken Thomas complex, Kildare

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