AC Firenze

4 out of 5 stars4 Stars

Via Luciano Bausi, 5, Florence, Tuscany, 50100, Italy
AC Hotel Firenze by Marriott
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90%

Satisfaction Excellent
Excellent
32%
97
Very Good
39%
118
Average
19%
57
Poor
4%
14
Terrible
3%
10

Value Score Average Value

Similarly priced and rated as other 4 star hotels

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Good For Solo
  • Families82
  • Couples82
  • Solo84
  • Business75

More about Florence

Photos

The Coat/Jacket that I wantedThe Coat/Jacket that I wanted

Bardi, Chapel, Giotto's Death of St. FrancisBardi, Chapel, Giotto's Death of St. Francis

Inside Capella di PazziInside Capella di Pazzi

The Duomo, late afternoon in NovemberThe Duomo, late afternoon in November

Forum Posts

FROM FLORENCE TO VENICE

by vincentbuhagiarooooo

Hi to all,
Can i have some info regarding a day trip from Florence to Venice and back.
Is it expencive?

Thank you in advance

Re: FROM FLORENCE TO VENICE

by Maurizioago

Well, it's a long jouney! I wouldn't recommend VEnice as a daytrip from Florence.See; www.trenitalia.com

You could visit Siena, San Gimignano. Pisa or Lucca as easy daytrips from Florence.

Re: FROM FLORENCE TO VENICE

by Maurizioago

Sahha! ...and welcome to VT!

Re: FROM FLORENCE TO VENICE

by leics

Take the train. Times, details and fares in English here:

http://trenitalia.it/homepage_en.html

You need the train to Venice SL (Santa Lucia). Venice Mestre station is on the mainland and you will need train or bus to go across the causeway to Venice proper.

Fater trains take just over 2 hours, one-way fare 42 euro.

Slower trains (click 'all solutions' on the Trenitalia site when it displays train times) take just over 3 hours, some with a change at Bologna, and cost from 19.40 euro one-way.

No need to buy tickets online in advance. Buy them at Florence SMN station either the day you travel or, if you prefer, a day or so in advance. Ticket machines are easy to use (cash is best, imo, to avoid potential issues with foreign cards) and have English language options.

Re: FROM FLORENCE TO VENICE

by leics

It's a feasible daytrip, with an early start and a late return.

There is a bus service, but it takes too long to make a daytrip feasible:

http://www.sena.it/Orari-Autobus/51-1.html

But, as Maurizio says, there are lots of places much nearer to Florence which are well worth visiting.

Re: FROM FLORENCE TO VENICE

by Redang

By train (www.trenitalia.it), two hours and 3 minutes (every hour) and 42 € (one way).

Re: FROM FLORENCE TO VENICE

by Redang

And don't forget to validate the ticket!

Re: FROM FLORENCE TO VENICE

by leics

Crikey yes! There are on-the-spot fines for non-validation and guards do check.

Train tickets need to be put into the little yellow machines on platforms to be date-stamped, before you board.

Bus tickets need to be stamped by machines inside buses (and vaporetto tickets need validating as well).

Re: FROM FLORENCE TO VENICE

by vincentbuhagiarooooo

Thank you all for the tip my friends

Travel Tips for Florence

A "book club meeting" in Florence

by Jefie

Next to traveling, literature is my biggest passion so it should come as no surprise that I've been a long-time member of an online book club. Just like VT, the members of my book club come from all over the world, and when I mentioned that I would be traveling to Italy, Lucia, who is from Parma, suggested we get together for lunch in Florence. Although I've met several VTers over the years, it was the first time I got to meet someone from my book club and it turned out to be one of my fondest memories from the days we spent in Florence! We shared a great meal together and wandered around the city for a while, talking about books, food, Italy... I can now only hope that I get to return the favour if Lucia ever makes it to Canada!

THE PONTEVECCHIO

An icon of...

by SirRichard

THE PONTEVECCHIO

An icon of Florence, the Pontevecchio is world famous for its jeweler shops (once upon a time there were butchers shops, but the Medici evicted them all in 1593). It was built to replace a 14th century wooden bridge that was destroyed by flooding, and was the only bridge that was not mined when the Nazis retreated in 1944 - they destroyed the streets on either side instead. The corridor running over the top of the shops was built by Vasari to link the Palazzo Pitti and the Palazzo Vecchio.

La Specola

by tompt

La Specola is a Natural History Museum. It is tucked away in the old Palazzo Torrigiani. When you walk in, you can´t believe you are in the right place. It looks like a student appartment building (which it partially is). The actual museum is at the second floor.
But when you get there it gets exciting. First there are many rooms full of stuffed animals, but the highlight of the museum is the large collection of wax models of human parts.
This models were made in the years between 1770-1840, and used for lessons at the university.

The museum is open from 9:00 - 13:00, closed on wednesday and holidays.

African Cat and Mouse

by geeyook about African Street Vendors

Africans peddling knock off designer sunglasses, handbags and watches (Fake Gucci, Oakley, Rolex, Louis Vitton) are all over the tourist areas in Florence. Although their prices are low, you have no recourse if you should get a defective or unacceptable item. If you must buy, be sure to bargain and examine merchandise thoroughly. They play a neverending cat and mouse game with the police. Packing up as the police approach and setting up again once they have passed.

Home-cooked goodness

by Tijavi about La Casalinga

La Casalinga is an unassuming osteria in Oltrarno. The speciality? Simple Tuscan fare that is brimming with home-cooked goodness - not pretentious, nor ambitious.

So despite the long 20-minute walk from the other side of the river, I did enjoy what I had that evening. Starters were antipasti di mare - mixed seafood cooked in olive oil. And for the main course, arista - a slab of pork baked the traditional Tuscan way. Dessert was delicious chocolate souffle.

From the simple dining area, guests could sometimes see the cooks at work in the kitchen. The sight of a chef skillfully slicing a slab of ham with nothing but his dependable knife is a reassurance that they know how to prepare good food here, and so are the numerous locals enjoying their dinner.

Comments

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 AC Firenze

We've found that other people looking for this hotel also know it by these names:

Ac Firenze Florence
Ac Firenze Hotel Florence
Ac Hotel Florence

Address: Via Luciano Bausi, 5, Florence, Tuscany, 50100, Italy