Villa Loghino

v Poggio Gennaio 60, Volterra, 56048, Italy
Villa Loghino
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More about Volterra

Photos

The belltower at our shrineThe belltower at our shrine

The flutist (not my pic)The flutist (not my pic)

Competitive flag-waving in the PiazzaCompetitive flag-waving in the Piazza

List of museums to visitList of museums to visit

Forum Posts

Vespa Rental

by megsmel

Has anyone rented a Vespa in Volterra? We're staying at villa in between Volterra and San Gimignano for a week and would like to have some cheap transportation between the 2 towns. Any ideas on cost or where to rent? Do the dirt roads permit scooters? Thanks!

RE: Vespa Rental

by Beausoleil

I have a photo of a row of red Vespas outside our restaurant in Volterra. Unfortunately, I have no idea where this is other than Volterra. But, yes, there is a rental place there! They would be excellent transportation between the two towns.

I don't know why you wouldn't be allowed on a dirt road. We didn't see any, but we didn't see much traffic at all when we were on dirt roads. They are well graded and hard so the scooters wouldn't hurt the roads unless it had rained for days and even then, a car would do more damage. There isn't anyone on the dirt roads to stop you anyway! The only thing you might run into is a private road but they are usually gated.

Check to see if you need any special license to use a Vespa. I have no idea.

RE: Vespa Rental

by jdowdy

We are reting a villa in voltera this summer 2006 (La Piola) from the parker company and I am wondering what you found when you went there. Also if you may have stayed in the same place I would love to know more about its location in relation to the town and how you fared with the bus/ train system.

Thanks

RE: Vespa Rental

by Beausoleil

Hi. We rented from Holiday-Rentals.com and were staying up in Greve the week we visited Volterra. It's a beautiful town. Be sure to visit the Etruscan Museum and also the Archeology Park. You'll have plenty to do both there and in the area. We had been to Siena the day before Volterra and Siena was a touristic madhouse. Volterra seemed so calm and welcoming. The views from the walls are fantastic.

We ate at Ombra della Sera and it was quite good. There's a wild boar by the door; you can't miss it! We only spent a day there and wished we could have spent more time. You'll love it. It's what everyone thinks of when you say "Italian Hill Town."

Travel Tips for Volterra

Never on a Monday

by Bunsch

Not just in Volterra...many (perhaps most) Italian museums are closed on Mondays. This can be a spirit-killer if you're only in a city or town for a single day and the museums are unavailable, which is why the Spirit moves me to suggest that much of Italy's great art is found in its churches, virtually all of which are open every day of the week (and are generally free, to boot). So find your Caravaggios and della Robbias in the local duomo, and soak in the notion that people have been hallowing with their prayers the place where they are situated for many hundreds of years.

Volterra - Velathri

by croisbeauty

Around the 8th century BC, Volterra became an important city of the new Etruscan civilization. At the time it was known as Velathri, bing one of the twelve major centres of Etruria, which was religious and political confederation of city-states. In fact, the archaeological evidence suggests that Volterra gradually became the dominant city of the confederation. Volterra was ruled by a Lucumo, who was both a military and a religious leader.
In the 4th century, however, Volterra became a confederate city in the expanding territory dominated by the Romans. During the period of Roman-Etruscan coexistence, many important monuments were erected in Volterra, including the buildings of the acropolis and the temple near the Roman amphitheatre.

Duomo Santa Maria Assunta

by Bigs

Sure , Volterra has a cathedral.......I think all bigger towns in Tuscany have...... This is quite simple from the inside and (so it´s written in the books) also the inside sall be simple..... I haven´t been in here, cause we didn´t found an open door.............

Imagine yourself as a Roman

by Bunsch

Sue Stone's top-rated Volterra page gives a good description of the remains of the Roman theater, located just outside the Porta Fiorentina. I never saw anyone actually enter the site, but there are numerous places where you can get an excellent view of the ranks of seats, the remaining pillars of the theater (both of which were constructed in the 1st century), and even the elaborate baths (a later 4th century addition) which were a part of the complex. As you can see from the photo, it looks pretty glamorous in the twilight!

Unfortunately, we just missed the Roman Theater Festival, which was due to take place from July 1-17, 2010. If you're likely to be in Volterra around that time next year, be sure to check out the performance schedule -- and really imagine that you're a Roman.

The Etruscan influence

by iandsmith

Strolling the hilltop park we, at times, were beside some Etruscan excavations. Unfortunately for us they were fenced off and inaccessible. Thus it was the only shot available was the sunset as it cast its fading hazy beams across the ruins.
The Etruscan acropolis is situated at the heighest point of Volterra 552 metres above sea level offering a breathtaking panoramic view of the surrounding countryside including the sea and the Appennines, always assuming you don't have the seemingly eternal haze!
The acropolis, situated in the beautiful surroundings of a landscaped park named after the Volterran archeologist Enrico Fiumi, is a very interesting archeological site showing evidence of the superimposed layers of the history of the city.
This part of the city was destroyed in 1472 by the Florentines and the site not only encloses the foundations of two Etruscan temples , identified as temples A and B, but the road which delimited the sacred area, the vestiges of dwellings dating back to the Hellenistic period, a complex system of cisterns one of which is known as the Piscina and the ruins of medieval towers and roads .

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