Sorell Hotel Seidenhof

3.5 out of 5 stars3.5 Stars

Sihlstrasse 9, Zurich, Zurich, 8021, Switzerland
Sorell Hotel Seidenhof
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Hotels.com Booking.com Travelocity

85%

Satisfaction Very Good
Excellent
18%
24
Very Good
51%
66
Average
16%
21
Poor
10%
13
Terrible
2%
3

Value Score Poor Value

Costs 59% more than similarly rated 3.5 star hotels

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Good For Couples
  • Families77
  • Couples84
  • Solo72
  • Business62

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Photos

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Schaan: St. Laurentius New Parish ChurchSchaan: St. Laurentius New Parish Church

View from the PolyterasseView from the Polyterasse

Forum Posts

Train From Zurich to Rome. Price?

by hcapon

Does anyone know about what it would cost for 1-28 year old woman and 1-30 year old man to travel from Zurich - Rome by train in March> I don't need an exact price just an average.

Re: Train From Zurich to Rome. Price?

by leics

Use the official Swiss railway website in English:

http://www.sbb.ch/en/

Search for the route, choose a March date and select a departure then follow the instructions to be given a fare.

For example, the 0736, with two changes, costs 203 euro standard fare and 193 euro 'special offer' (not sure what that is as I did not pursue the booking any further. Departures with only one change may have higher fares; I did not check.

Your age and gender are irrelevant. It is a long journey, at around 7.5 hours.

Re: Train From Zurich to Rome. Price?

by K_V_B

You can actually save a lot of money by combining a couple of special offers.
SBB has specials on several direct trains out of Switzerland. You can find them here:
https://www.sbb.ch/mct/wi/shop/b2c/pipSchritt_0.do
Zürich - Milano (the first part of your trip to Rome) is only 25,- francs pp if you book in advance. That's about 20 euros at current exchange rates :-)
For Milano - Roma you can buy tickets for the high speed train starting at 49,- on www.trenitalia.com. (But you need to book in advance). I would suggest you plan some time in Milano however.
A normal "base" price ticket for the high speed train on Milano Roma is 89,-. Slower trains are cheaper.

Re: Train From Zurich to Rome. Price?

by K_V_B

Another option would be to spend the day in Milano and take the night train to Roma. For two persons in a basic two person compartment the total is 155,- euro.

Re: Train From Zurich to Rome. Price?

by blusky

Hey there!

Here's the link of trenitalia page in English. You can put your own options and choose the dates, either from Zurich airport or Zurich main train station.
http://orario.trenitalia.com/b2c/nppPriceTravelSolutions.do?stazin=zuri&stazout=Roma+Termini&datag=13&datam=03&dataa=2011&timsh=07&timsm=00&car=0&stazin_r=Staz_DA&stazout_r=Staz_A&datag_r=01&datam_r=01&dataa_r=2009&timsh_r=01&timsm_r=00&trencounter=0&nreq=5&solotreno=0&npag=1&sort=0&trencounter_r=0&nreq_r=5&solotreno_r=0&npag_r=1&sort_r=0&traintype=&traintype=&lang=en&channel=tcom
As you'll see the lenght of the trip is around 7 hours and 40 minutes with change in Milano. Zurich to Milano in second class will cost you around 65 euro and from MiLano to Rome it will be around 90 euro. THere are also offers all year round so maybe you'll be able to get some discount. Check the website of trenitalia for more info.

Re: Train From Zurich to Rome. Price?

by leics

Unfortunately, many posters have found buying tickets via Trenitalia with a card from abroad to be near enough impossible.

It is worth a try, as the prices are lower, but you may experience difficulties.

Travel Tips for Zürich

The lost generation of opera composers

by Nemorino



Photos:
1. Audience in the Zürich opera house
2. The orchestra in the Zürich opera house

In June 2010 in the Zürich opera house I had a super box seat (thanks, Camille!) with some lovely people for a performance of the opera Der ferne Klang (The distant sound) by Franz Schreker (1878-1934).

This is Schreker's second opera. It had its world premiere in Frankfurt am Main in 1912 but has not been performed there in recent years.

Of the three Schreker operas I have seen so far, this is the one that impressed me the most. It is about a young composer named Fritz who leaves his native village to seek a mysterious distant sound that lures him away. His lovely village sweetheart, whom he leaves behind, has to flee the village to avoid a forced marriage to the local innkeeper.

In the second act, the composer and his village girlfriend meet again under very different circumstances. She is the top courtesan of a posh Italian nightclub near Venice, and for a while it looks like they might get together again, but then his moralistic side gets the better of him and he rejects her as a hyped-up prostitute.

The third act is one of the most clever opera acts I have ever seen. It takes place in the canteen of an opera house during the third act of the world premiere of this very opera. The first two acts have gone very well, but the third is a flop. The opera director wants the composer to revise the third act and give it another try the next season, but the composer is old and discouraged.

Then an elderly lady is brought in. She turns out to be the composer's long-lost village girlfriend who has been in the audience watching the story of her own life unfold on the opera stage. They have a touching reconciliation scene which gives the composer renewed hope and inspiration. He resolves to revise the third act after all, but then he collapses and dies in her arms.

(As I write this I am listening to the gorgeous finale of Der ferne Klang on YouTube.)

Since Schreker was half Jewish, his music was banned by the Nazis as soon as they seized power in Germany in 1933 -- a fate he shared with several of the other leading composers of his generation such as Erich Wolfgang Korngold (1897-1957), Alexander von Zemlinsky (1871-1942), Ernst Krenek (1900-1991) and Kurt Weill (1900-1950), as well as the Austrian operetta composer Oscar Straus (1870-1954).

Schreker was the only one of these composers who did not go into exile -- because he died in 1934 before he had a chance to do so.

The others all ended up in America and continued composing with varied degrees of success.

Zemlinsky died in poverty in New York in 1942, leaving a not-quite-finished opera called Der König Kandaules which was not performed until 1996. (I have seen it twice, in Cologne and Kaiserslautern.)

Krenek became an American citizen and taught for decades at American and Canadian universities, but in his later years was not notably successful as a composer.

Kurt Weill continued composing in America, where he wrote the music to Knickerbocker Holiday (1938), Lady in the dark (1941) and the musical film Where do we go from here? (1945). He also wrote an American opera, Street Scene, which had its world premiere in New York in 1947.

Oscar Straus also got established in America, where he composed some very successful film scores and Broadway musicals like The Chocolate Soldier.

The most successful in America was Korngold, who became one of Hollywood's elite composers of film music in the 1930s and 40s and won two Oscars for his film scores -- but even Korngold did not succeed in reviving his composing career in Europe after the end of the Second World War and the fall of the Nazis.

One of the exciting things about the European opera scene in the 21st century is that the works of this lost generation of composers are finally being revived and finding their way back into the repertoire.

The Grossmünster Cathedral

by matcrazy1

.
With its distinctive twin sugar-loafed towers, and a venerable history at the heart of the Swiss-German Reformation, the Grossmünster – or Great Minster – dominates Zürich’s skyline.
In a tight-packed city of generally modest, small-scale architecture, it is dauntingly gigantic; and yet, caught half a millennium ago in the eye of a tight-lipped theological hurricane, it has been denuded of virtually all its interior decorative grandeur.
. The old town with Grossmunster Cathedral.

Walking up and down the...

by swissgabe

Walking up and down the Bahnhofstrasse for shopping in some of the most exclusive shops in Switzerland.
Buy watches from Omega, Rolex or Swatches only. Go for Gucci and such shops. Buy at Sprüngli the exculive sweets they offer or just take a look here...!

Swiss beer: Feldschloesschen

by HORSCHECK

Feldschloesschen is the largest brewery in Switzerland. Its headquarters are located in a castle in Rheinfelden. The brewery was established in 1876 and was acquired by Carlsberg in 2000.

Their most popular beer is a classic lager. Besides many other beer types, Feldschloesschen also produces mineral water.

Beaches

by german_eagle

When it gets hot in Zürich in summer (which is quite often I think) locals enjoy a lazy day at one of the many beaches along the lake shore or the river banks. Zürich must be the city with most beaches worldwide!

I happened to walk by the Mythenquai beach and saw that entrance was free that Sunday - the watch shop Beyer had an anniversary and treated everyone to the beach (plus everyone got a chocolate Vreneli :-)). So I went in and relaxed for a half hour, even walked knee-deep in the water (didn't bring a swimsuit, too bad). It was fun to watch the locals enjoying their Sunday afternoon, especially the guys and gals jumping from the 1/3/5 m heights into the lake ... quite a show, LOL! You can rent anything you need. Lockers are free if you bring your own lock. Otherwise rent a cabin for the day (CHF 3).

Comments

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 Sorell Hotel Seidenhof

We've found that other people looking for this hotel also know it by these names:

Sorell Hotel Z�rich

Address: Sihlstrasse 9, Zurich, Zurich, 8021, Switzerland