Kensington Court Bayswater London

4 Princes Square, London, W2 4NP, United Kingdom
Kensington Court Hotel Notting Hill
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50%

Satisfaction Terrible
Excellent
10%
10
Very Good
16%
16
Average
24%
24
Poor
15%
15
Terrible
34%
34

N/A

Value Score No Data

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Good For Families
  • Families39
  • Couples31
  • Solo14
  • Business35

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Photos

Westminster AbbeyWestminster Abbey

Answer 18Answer 18

St. James Park 4St. James Park 4

The very 'un posh' entrance door wayThe very 'un posh' entrance door way

Forum Posts

BEST [ECONOMICAL] MOBILE PHONE/ISP COY FOR TOURISTS

by lovejet

Which is the most reliable and economical mobile phone and/or laptop internet service/package to subscribe to on arrival in London, for a tourist?
My 02 line, which was the first stall i saw at Heathrow, proved too expensive to run on my last visit and cross continental roaming charges rule out my home phone as an alternative.Are hotspots widespread? pls recommend.

Re: BEST [ECONOMICAL] MOBILE PHONE/ISP COY FOR TOURISTS

by cubsur

Well I live in Portugal and on a recent visit to the UK I bought and used an O2 pay as you go 3G 'dongle' which, at about £1 per hour, was considerably cheaper than the prices being demanded by hotels for use of their hot spots.

There are hotspots in many urban areas but coverage is very patchy. For example in the town I used to live in UK, pop 35,000, there are none apart from the expensive hotel services. That's why I bought the dongle, which I can use anywhere and again when next I visit.

A good source for hotspot listings is http://wi-fi.jiwire.com/

Many operators have interconnect roaming agreements eg with BT openworld which means, for me, if a BT Openworld hot spot is available I can use it free courtesy of my account at home. However not all are so generous and I often find myself having to pay a fee.

Re: BEST [ECONOMICAL] MOBILE PHONE/ISP COY FOR TOURISTS

by Naftali

I don't have specific experience in London, with mobile phones, but having done extensive traveling in Israel, I have always used a phone from Talk n Save. I was able to keep an American number as well as a local Israeli number and often was offered a 2 for 1 deal, which kept my wife and I in contact. I recently saw that they are now in the UK, you can try their website. TalknSave.co.uk.

Good Trip

Naftali

Travel Tips for London

Tower Bridge

by Ash59

Tower Bridge was first used in 1894. In those days, the arms of the bridge were lifted an average of 16 times a day. It is a rare site to see them lifted today.

The bridge was designed so that when the bridge was raised, pedestrians still had access across the river. The gangway that you can see going from the top of one tower to the other could be accessed via stairwells in the towers. Thankfully, lifts have now been fitted.

Flowers and bricks

by ZanieOR

There was so much to seen while sightseeing in London (and nearby Hampton Court) it was easy to miss the little things ... the architectural details, the unusual signs and different customs.
When you get a chance slow down, sit down on a park bench, soak in the day, smell the roses. I remember stopping to admire the juxtaposition of colorful flower against old brick ... a tiny, tiny symbol of the many, many lovely things in London. And the world.

Japan centre

by daryll

For Londoners! If you fancy Japanese then go to Japan centres in Piccadily has the most valueble price for sushi and sashimi, and even got a groceries store at the basement, restaurant cum travel agencies on ground floor, internet and comic or manga books available on the 1st floor.

London Tonight

by Superhans

It's a local news program on ITV (channel 3). But they always cover cultural issues and lots of things London, if something is happening they will tell you about it. Especially good friday afternoon or early evening when they have recomendations for the weekend. Its on around lunchtime and 6pm. I cant recomend this program enough, it could be really valuable.

More Differences Across The Pond {Chapter 3}

by Elena_007

arse: Yes, you guessed it, only difference in usage would be someone in the UK saying, "I can't be arsed", meaning "I can't be bothered."

bangers: sausage. Most commonly used when referring to bangers and mash, which is a very English dish consisting of sausages and mash potatoes.

bitter: a proper English beer, not to be confused with lager, which is weak by comparison.

blag: to convince someone of giving or doing something for nothing, as in blag a ride to work. In US, they would bum a ride, but since bum means something entirely different in England, you would NEVER hear that expression.

bloke: a man, fellow, guy, or male. You would not refer to a male friend as a bloke, it is more reserved for some bloke you don't know. (A Joe Public in England or sometimes referred to as a "Joe Blow" in America). Please, don't go around saying, "Hi blokes! How are you?"

blow off: The act of breaking wind, also known as chuffing. To blow someone off in America could best be described as ignoring them, not farting on them. To complicate things further, someone in the UK who is chuffed, is very happy, meaning something very different than chuffing.

Bob's your Uncle!: Ta Da! There you have it! Similar to an American expression, "That's how the cookie crumbles!"

bog: another slang name for toilet, although the loo is used more frequently. A loo roll, or a bog roll, is a roll of toilet tissue in the US.

bonnet: the hood of a vehicle.
boot: the trunk of a vehicle.
hood: in the UK, a hood is a convertible top.

boozer: a pub. Fancy a pint?

bottle: nerve. To lose someone's bottle is like losing one's nerve.

braces: suspenders in the UK.
braces: metal grid-like covering teeth for straightening purposes in the US. (in UK-brace)

bugger: multi purpose Brit word. An inoffensive insult. You little bugger, you!

bum: what you are sitting on as you read this. The body part that makes contact with the chair, your derriere, or rear end. (among other less polite words). What Americans call bums, in the UK, they are called tramps.

Comments

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