Millbatch Farm

59 St Marys Road, Meare, Glastonbury, BA6 9SR, United Kingdom
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99%

Satisfaction Excellent
Excellent
58%
14
Very Good
25%
6
Average
16%
4
Poor
0%
0
Terrible
0%
0

N/A

Value Score No Data

Good For Families
  • Families100
  • Couples66
  • Solo100
  • Business0

More about Glastonbury

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Artisan cakes. :-)Artisan cakes. :-)

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Glastonbury TribunalGlastonbury Tribunal

Renew hope, all ye who enter here!Renew hope, all ye who enter here!

Forum Posts

Glastonbury Abbey - How close can you get?

by wanderingbtrfly

I'm going to Glastonbury in a few months and I don't want to get my hopes up about sitting in the abbey ruins, so...

How close can you get to the actual abbey ruins? Is it like Stonehenge, with a roped fence around it so no one can get up close?

Thanks so much!

Re: Glastonbury Abbey - How close can you get?

by Kakapo2

When I was there ages ago you could get everywhere, and if you have a look at the abbey's website this does not seem to have changed. Click on "Grounds" and you find all places listed:

http://www.glastonburyabbey.com/grounds.php?&sid=590be669dfbe7641fe99b03615f4aec0&rpn=opening

Sissi

Re: Glastonbury Abbey - How close can you get?

by leics

The Abbey itself is fully accessible (unless there are safety issues/renovation works going on), so you should have no problems.

Stonehenge access is limited because of the underlying archaeology immediately surrounding the site, the massive number of visitors and previous instances of vandalism/graffiti; this is not such a problem with other historical/archaeological sites in the UK.

Re: Glastonbury Abbey - How close can you get?

by bathman

I was there just before Christmas. No restrictions (apart from a ticket booth!). You can get in free if you stay at Abbey House.

Wierd town, well worth a visit

Travel Tips for Glastonbury

King Arthur's Realm

by RACCOON1

The supposed grave of King Arthur is located in Glastonbury .

The legend of King Arthur probably had its roots in and around 410 AD when the Romans withdrew from Britain.

There is some evidence that King Arthur was Roman or a Roman Briton.

Aftre that you cane believe what ever you want .

Full Moons in Glasters

by englishchris

Every full moon, there are various happenings in Glastonbury.
There are a couple of open meditations held around the "Glastonbury Experience" in the town, as well as spontaneous get togethers on the top of the Tor.
If you are lucky enough to get the chance to get to one of the full moon open evenings at Chalice Well - dont miss it as they can be magical.

The Essentials....

by RandomDreamer

Bring Clothes for sun and rain. In 2005 it rained for the first time in weeks and most people were left unprepaired. Wellington Boots and raincoats sold out in an hour or so and most people were either walking around barefoot or with bagos on their feet. Unsurprisingly, in the months after the festival many people reported symptoms much less serious but not too dis-similar to that of Trenchfoot.

For some reason the organisers didn't lay down any hay until the Sunday when most people had already ruined all their feet/shoes/trousers.

BRING BOOTS.... I can't stress that enough. Even if it's hot and dry, tens of thousands of people trampling on the same bits of grounds causes mud and lots of it. Bring all your necessary medicines although their are first aid tents if you get stuck. Bring your own toilet paper too and lots of sunscreen. Lots of film. Mosp people bring 2 man tents as they are spacious but don't take up much room (we all need to share the space). If there's lots of you consider a small marquee and definitely bring camping chairs... sitting on the floor all weekend can become annoying. Again... BOOTS AND TOILET PAPER!!!! Also, bring your own food and don't forget your ticket! Cigarettes are expensive here too so bring enough if you smoke.

If you choose to bring a mobile phone there's an Orange tent that'll charge it for you for a small donation to charity.

Go up to the Tor.

by leics

The Tor is a good mile and a half's largely uphill walk from the town centre (and then you have to climb the Tor itself).

There is no car parking nearby. You'll need to park in the town centre.

If you visit in season, there is a park & ride service (which is a very good idea). But it finishes at the end of September.

If you do decide to walk to the top you will be rewarded (on a clear day) with fantastic views over the surrounding countryside.

Only the tower remains of St Michael's church, dating from the 14th century but on the site of an even earlier church. There are Iron Age earthworks; there was a settlement (a hill-fort) on the Tor then, and excavation has also shown Roman occupation.

But the seven terraces clearly seen on the slopes remain a mystery. They could be related to agriculture (but they are on all sides, even the north) or they could be defensive ramparts (although they are not as they normally are)...or they could form part of a Neolithic 'labyrinth', a sacred processional way in prehistoric times. My feeling is that the latter theory is the most likely but proving it is impossible, of course.

And, of course, the Tor is also supposed to be the Isle of Avalon in the Arthurian legend.

Whatever its origins, it's worth making the effort to get to the top. I didn't this time, so my photos are all from down below......

St Michael's Tower

by Sjalen

The top of the Tor was levelled out in the 900s or 1000s to create space for the church of St Michael de Torre which was built then, on a site already used by Celtic tribes and Saxon monks throughout times. The levelling made it impossible to make many later archaeological finds from Saxon days which is a pity but it did give space for the church, although the ruined tower we see today indicates a smaller church than originally built as the first church was destroyed in an earthquake in 1275! St Michael's would probably still have stood as a church were it not for Henry VIII's dissolution of the monasteries in the 16th century, which hit Glastonbury with its abbey quite hard. After the dissolution, it was used as a stone quarry like many other English church buildings and that is why you now see only the tower - a great place to shelter from the wind in!

Comments

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