Holyland Hotel

Nezer David Street, Bayit Vegan, P.O.Box 2461, Jerusalem, 91023, Israel
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86%

Satisfaction Very Good
Excellent
12%
1
Very Good
37%
3
Average
37%
3
Poor
12%
1
Terrible
0%
0

N/A

Value Score No Data

Good For Families
  • Families50
  • Couples0
  • Solo0
  • Business0

More about Holyland Hotel

Model of Jeusalem in the Second Temple Era

by iblatt

In the year 66 AD, just before the great revolt of the Jews against the Romans, which ended in the destruction of Jerusalem and the temple (70 AD), ancient Jerusalem was at its grandest.
It covered a territory twice the size of today's walled Old City. The magnificent temple built by Herod stood on Mt. Moriah (Temple Mount). Across the Tyropheon valley rose the Upper City built on a hill, with magnficent mansions; and on its slope was the Lower City, with more humble dwellings.

Do you want to see all that? Visit the model of Jeusalem in the Second Temple era, on the grounds of the Israel Museum. This model was commissioned by Hans Kroch, owner of the Holyland Hotel; the project took four years to complete and was supervised by the renowned archaeologist Michael Avi-Yona. The model was built based on knowledge gained from both ancient literature and modern archaeological findings. It opened to the public in 1966.

Forty years later the model was relocated to the grounds of the Israel Museum, after the Holyland Hotel was torn down, giving rise to ugly, monstrous apartment building in Jerusalem's biggest real estate scandal.

The temple model of Jerusalem

by 807Wheaton

This fantastic model of ancient Jerusalem is on the grounds of the Holyland Hotel Jerusalem. Visiting this site is like a time-travel experience.
Here the visitor is taken back to 70 AD before Jerusalem was ransacked by the Romans.
The model is built to 1:50 scale with authentic construction materials.
Certainly a visit here is the focal point of any visit to Jerusalem.

Since visiting Jerusalem we have been to Orlando, FL to see the Holyland Experience which is a theme park that has reconstructed quite a bit of the familiar landmarks of Israel. I have put a few samples of the park on my Orlando, Florida Page.

West Jerusalem: Sculpture Garden & Israel Museum

by Ekaterinburg

The Israel Museum is large with several different buildings. There's an Archeological Wing, an Arts Wing and a Judaica and Jewish Ethnography Wing. A fairly recent addition to the museum's attractions is the open air, model of Jerusalem, previously located at the HolyLand Hotel - far better than a map for finally grasping what's where in the city- but the major attraction is the tagine-shaped building called The Shrine of the Book, which holds the Dead Sea Scrolls. This is what we came to see and after examining the model of the city from every angle and finally getting a grasp of where we actually were, this is where we headed. These 2000 year old scrolls were discovered in 1947 at Qumran near the Dead Sea and were written during the Second temple period by the Essenes, a fundamentalist sect of of jews. They are remarkably well preserved and obviously of great historical interest but I am not a lover of manuscripts behind glass and after 10 minutes I'd had enough. Outside I'd seen signs for a Sculpture Garden and I was curious to see what it contained. This is just uphill from the Shrine of the Book and a refreshing and original way to display art. In between the gravel paths, clusters of olive trees and grassy expanses, you come upon a weird and wonderful display of modern sculpture, culminating in the monumental Henry Moore piece called Vertebrae. This was the first piece of Henry Moore's work I'd seen outside of Art History books and lectures and it was a big thrill for me. I'm sorry I missed the Judaica wing as I believe there are some marvellously colourful displays there and when I revisit Jerusalem this will be high on my must-see list. Admission cost is NIS 42, a little over EUR 8. For information on opening times and current exhibitions check the website.

Days 7 and 8 of our Trip to the Holy Land

by southeys

"Day Seven - Chagall Windows & Herod's Jerusalem"

The Chagall Windows are situated in the Synagogue of the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Centre. The floors and interior walls are made of Jerusalem Stone, and the Synagogue is illuminated by a hanging lantern and by sunlight when it comes through the Chagall Windows.

Each of the twelve stained glass windows represents Marc Chagall's interpretation of one of the twelve tribes of Israel. Unfortunately we were unable to take photographs here but they can be seen at this web-site.

Chagall Windows

From there, we went to the model of Jerusalem in the time of Herod. This is a large model of Jerusalem as it would have been in Herod's time, done to 1/50 scale using authentic material.

The construction of the model was the initiative of Hans Kroch under the supervision of the archaeologist Professor Michael Avi-Yonah of the Hebrew University. Professor Avi-Yonah supervised the construction of the model and its renovation until his death in 1974.

Originally constructed on the grounds of Jerusalem’s Holyland Hotel, this landmark has, now, become a feature of the Museum of Israel’s twenty-acre campus, adjacent to the Shrine of the Book.

The Shrine of the Book is the Dorot Foundation Dead Sea Scrolls Information and Study Centre, in Memory of Joy Gottesman Ungerleider, and houses the Dead Sea Scrolls or, at least, those have been released to the public.

"Day Seven - Back to Bethlehem"

After our visit to the Model and the Shrine of the Book, we returned to Bethlehem. This time we were visiting the Lutheran church in Bethlehem, where we were allowed to celebrate an Eucharist service.

Bethlehem Lutheran Church

The church seems to have the main church at ground level and a chapel higher up. We were able to use the chapel and the adjoining photograph of a Bethlehem street scene was taken from the balcony.

"Day Seven - Bethany"

Bethany was the place where three of Jesus' friends lived. This fact is commemorated, as most are in the Holy Land, with a church. Bethany is commonly identified with the Palestinian village of al-Eizariya located on the south eastern slope of the Mount of Olives, near Jerusalem. This was our last visit on our only Sunday in Israel.

Lazarus, Mary and Martha play a part at least two episodes in the Gospels, but were probably close friends of Jesus and their house was a place where he could relax and be himself.

In the first episode, in Luke's Gospel, the three entertain Jesus in their house. Martha was rushing round preparing dinner while Mary sat at Jesus feet listening to what he had to say. Martha was incensed at this and demanded that Jesus reprimand Mary but Jesus refused to do this.

The second episode is told in John's Gospel when Lazarus died and was placed in a tomb. Jesus, returning from the Galilee region after Lazarus' death, resurrected him and he walked out of the tomb.

"Day Seven - Garden Tomb"

Our tour guide told us that Christian sites can be graded as A for sites whose authenticity is certain and B for those they are less certain about . . . and so on. The Garden Tomb is probably a grade F or G in terms of authenticity but A in terms of ambiance.

One problem with the Garden Tomb is that, based on its configuration, it dates from the late Old Testament era (9th-7th century BC). Thus it was not a "new tomb" (Matt 27:60; John 19:41) at the time of the crucifixion.

In addition, the burial benches were cut down in the Byzantine period (4th-6th century AD) to create rock sarcophagi, radically disfiguring the tomb. This clearly indicates that early Christians did not believe this was the burial place of Christ.

Because the site is not authentic, no-one has attempted to build a monument on it and today it looks very much as the real Calvary would have looked in Jesus time. There is even a rock face in which a face can be discerned.

We nearly missed out on our visit to the tomb as it was not on the guide's itinerary but he was able to add it in and I'm very glad he did. Maintained by the UK-based Garden Tomb Association, the gardens are spiritually refreshing (if you can get there without the crowds) and give you a better feeling of 'being there' than the Holy Sepulchre church will.

"Day Eight - St Anne's Church & Bethesda"

We started day eight, Wednesday, by being taken by coach round to St Stephen's Gate. This pleased Chris as her brother is called Stephen. From the gate, we were led to St Anne's Church, reputed to be on or near the birth place of Mary and residence of Joachim and Anne, her parents.

The acoustics in the church are amazing and our guide was somewhat contemptuous of an American party ahead of us, singing Amazing Grace. Apparently it's a standing joke in Israel that the only hymn that the Americans know is Amazing Grace. When it came to our turn, we sang, "Guide me! Oh thou great Redeemer!"

When we'd finished, there was a short silence and we found the acoustics were so good that we could easily hear two pigeons cooing, high up in the roof.

Next to the church are the ruins of the Pools of Bethesda. The first pool was dug out during the 8th Century BC and was called "the Upper Pool". It is mentioned in the Book of Kings II, chapter 18 verse 17, the Book of Isaiah, chapter 36, verse 2 and in the Book of Isaiah, chapter 7, verse 3:

A second pool was dug during the third century BC by Simon the High Priest. These pools were used to wash the sheep prior to their sacrifice in the Temple. This use of the pools gave the water of the pools a halo of sanctity, and many invalids came to the pools to be healed. It's also the place where Jesus healed the crippled man who was unable to get into the pool when the water became agitated and minerals were stirred up.

"Day Eight - The Church of the Sisters of Zion"

From St Anne's Church, we went to the Church of the Sisters of Zion which contains an explanatory model of the Antonia Fortress. In the chapel that we held a Eucharist service, the altar was situated under a side arch of the Roman triumphal arch which is built into the choir, producing a striking effect. The arch is known as Ecco Homo, 'Behold the man', the words of Pontius Pilate about Jesus when speaking to the mob.

In the basement is a passage which runs past a large Herodian cistern into the crypt. Here we are on the original ground level: the floor of the crypt is the paving of a court in the Antonia Fortress, the pavement referred to in John's Gospel, Chapter 19 verse 13. In the pavement are scratches made by Roman soldiers, including a kind of board game.

It seems certain that on this pavement Christ stood before Pilate, was condemned, mocked and crowned with the crown of thorns

"Day Eight - the Via Dolorosa"

Via Dolorosa means 'The way of sorrows' and is the reputed path that Jesus took, carrying his cross from the Antonia Fortress to Calvary. The Way is marked by nine of the fourteen stations of the cross. The later stations are in the Holy Sepulchre church. Many of the stations are marked by a simple marker while others have more elaborate shrines.

We followed the Via Dolorosa, stopping at each station to hear a reading, say a prayer, and sing a hymn. Being the loud mouth of the group, I got to do a reading in the middle of a crowded street.

1. Jesus is condemned to death
2. Jesus receives the cross
3. Jesus falls the first time
4. Jesus meets His Mother
5. Simon of Cyrene carries the cross
6. Veronica wipes Jesus' face with her veil
7. Jesus falls the second time
8. Jesus meets the women of Jerusalem
9. Jesus falls the third time
10. Jesus is stripped of His garments
11. Crucifixion: Jesus is nailed to the cross
12. Jesus dies on the cross
13. Jesus' body is removed from the cross (Pieta)
14. Jesus is laid in the tomb

"Holy Sepulchre Church"

Holy Sepulchre Church is the end of the Via Dolorosa. It encompasses the site of Calvary, where Jesus was crucified, the place where his body was laid out, and the tomb where his body was laid, all in one building.

Unlike the Garden Tomb, this looks nothing like it would have done in Jesus day. The Tomb is now encased in scaffolding and every where else is a mixture of Catholic and Orthodox church monuments.

There is very little room inside the tomb and people are allowed in, in groups of about four at a time and for a short time only. I didn't have a wide angle lens so this is the best photograph I could get.

From the Holy Sepulchre Church, we had the rest of the day at leisure. Chris and I stopped in the souk for a bite to eat and were well and truly conned. We ordered a shawarma, which was duly served. Once we'd eaten, I asked for the bill and was told that it was US$100. As we'd eaten, I didn't have a leg to stand on but we were later advised that we should have asked for a receipt and that would probably brought the price down.

Having lost our appetite for shopping, Chris and I decided to see how far we could walk around on the walls. Getting on at Jaffa Gate, at a cost of about two pounds each, we walked to St Stephens Gate, on the opposite of the city. From there we got down because it didn't go any further, and the rest of the way back to Jaffa Gate on the outside of the walls. A good bit of exercise.

Photos

Old city model, HolyLand Hotel, JerusalemOld city model, HolyLand Hotel, Jerusalem

Forum Posts

Traveling with kids...

by suekam

My family will be coming to Jerusalem for 1 week in June. I haven't been to Israel in 16 years, and the last time I was there I was on a youth tour where all arrangements were taken care of!! A bit different coming as a parent with 2 kids...!! A few questions...

1) What's the best way to get to Jerusalem from the airport?? We arrive 9:30AM on a Monday.

2) We're thinking of doing the Biblical Zoo/Tisch Zoological Gardens on Tuesday. Reviews?? We're not sure if we're going to have transportation available or not. If not, what's the safest way to get a cab? Are all the cabs that are driving around reputable??

3) We have a lot of family (and a lot of kids...) touring together on Wed. We may have a bus or some other form of group transportation. Suggestions for a kid-friendly agenda?? We thought of the Jerusalem Model at the Holyland hotel and maybe the Chagall windows. How close together are those 2 things??

4) Does anyone know how stroller-accessible the Kotel tunnel tours are?? Roughly how long do they last??

5) General suggestions for dealing w/ jet lag, in either direction?? My kids are 4 and 7.

6) Are there any special attractions scheduled that would be of interest for children during the week of June 19-23??

7) And, a mundane but important question, at least as far as my 4-year old is concerned... do they sell Cheerios in Israel?? (That will determine how many boxes of them I bring!!)

Any info would be most appreciated!!

Thanks!

Sue


Traveling with kids...

by suekam

My family will be coming to Jerusalem for 1 week in June. I haven't been to Israel in 16 years, and the last time I was there I was on a youth tour where all arrangements were taken care of!! A bit different coming as a parent with 2 kids...!! A few questions...

1) What's the best way to get to Jerusalem from the airport?? We arrive 9:30AM on a Monday.

2) We're thinking of doing the Biblical Zoo/Tisch Zoological Gardens on Tuesday. Reviews?? We're not sure if we're going to have transportation available or not. If not, what's the safest way to get a cab? Are all the cabs that are driving around reputable??

3) We have a lot of family (and a lot of kids...) touring together on Wed. We may have a bus or some other form of group transportation. Suggestions for a kid-friendly agenda?? We thought of the Jerusalem Model at the Holyland hotel and maybe the Chagall windows. How close together are those 2 things??

4) Does anyone know how stroller-accessible the Kotel tunnel tours are?? Roughly how long do they last??

5) General suggestions for dealing w/ jet lag, in either direction?? My kids are 4 and 7.

6) Are there any special attractions scheduled that would be of interest for children during the week of June 19-23??

7) And, a mundane but important question, at least as far as my 4-year old is concerned... do they sell Cheerios in Israel?? (That will determine how many boxes of them I bring!!)

Any info would be most appreciated!!

Thanks!

Sue


RE: Traveling with kids...

by gilabrand

I have tips on my Jerusalem, Lod and Israel pages to answer ALL your questions. But here are some brief answers. Best way to get to Jerusalem from the airport - a shared taxi van called a "sherut" (see my Lod page). The Holyland Model has been moved to the Israel Museum and is not open to the public yet. Read my tip about using cabs (Israel page). The Chagall Windows are just colored glass - nothing exciting. I don't think you can take a stroller into the Kotel tunnels. Breakfast cereals - I think we have almost every American brand you can think of. Except I think just this past month I read something about the importers not bringing in the unsweetened Cheerios, just the sugary kind. Biblical zoo - read my tip.

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