Madareem Crown Hotel

PO Box 103308 (aka Al Fahd Crown) on highway road King Khaled International Airport, Riyadh, 11695
Madareem Crown Hotel
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67%

Satisfaction Poor
Excellent
6%
2
Very Good
17%
5
Average
44%
13
Poor
17%
5
Terrible
13%
4

N/A

Value Score No Data

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Good For Couples
  • Families0
  • Couples50
  • Solo0
  • Business33

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Forum Posts

sandstorms

by eingweide

Hello. I'm wondering what happens in Riyadh after a sand storm has swept across the city? I understand that everything is covered in a layer of dust, but what does the city do to clean up? Are there street sweeping crews? Do people wash buildings? Is it common to use water or does that just make it more of a mess? How often does this happen? What do individuals do? Does the city shut down like northern cities do after a snow blizzard?

Thanks for your replies.

Re: sandstorms

by fahad_net2000

well,
Frankly, nothing is done after a sandstorm. Its a shame, I know, that no authority is taking such responsability. Locals, on the other hand, usually clean up the mess. Speaking of myself, we wash the dust of the outdoors and wipe it out from indoors.

Re: sandstorms

by eingweide

Thank you for your response. I've been wondering about this for a while. My company was working on a planning project outside of Riyadh and we had little understanding of what to expect for post-sandstorm activity. Would you say it would be a great benefit to the city to have a fleet of street sweepers that manage the dust after a storm?

Travel Tips for Riyadh

Taking Photos Privately in Riyadh Public

by Dthey

For the eager snap shooter, this city is still new to this idea.

Although it was announced that photography in the public were allowed for quite some time, still most Saudi citizens, especially women in black (those covered from head-to-toe) are not accustomed seeing foreigners snapping photos around them.

Taking photos in public to be allowed Published: 2005-7-6

They have this notion that once captured by the camera, soul leaves its body and goes somewhere else, perhaps with the photograph. In most cases locals would not want their women exposed even with their cloak and veil on. To avoid arguments or police confrontations take photos in places away or unseen by these kind of people.

Understandably they are only few decades old in their civilization. We foreigners should allow the tribes to adjust to this technology.

In addition, it is prohibited to photograph government buildings of any kind. It is best to keep this in mind to spare you from big trouble.

The picture on the left is of...

by Mushtie

The picture on the left is of Faisaliah Centre which has a shopping centre, Hotel, Banks and has a very nice observatory up at the top of the tower and view Riyadh city. Inside the diamond shaped crystal at the very top of the tower is a two floor restaurant and a cigar club! trips to the desert, four wheel driving. Everyone I have spoken to says that Saudi Arabia has that certain attraction that makes you want to come back more than once as well as to see what has changed as the country is changing at a rapid pace.

WHY IS THE FAMILY SO...

by AliJoe



WHY IS THE FAMILY SO IMPORTANT TO MUSLIM ?



The family is the foundation of Islamic society. The peace and security offered by a stable family unit is greatly valued and seen as essential for the spiritual growth of its members. A harmonious social order is created by the existence of extended families; children are treasured and rarely leave home until the time they marry.

Parents are greatly respected in the Islamic tradition. Mothers are particularly honored the Qur'an teaches that since mothers suffer during pregnancy, childbirth and child rearing, they deserve a special consideration and kindness.

It is stated in the Qur'an : ' And we have enjoined upon man ( to be good ) to his parents. With difficulty upon difficulty did his mother bear him and wean him for two years. Show gratitude to ME and to your parents; to ME is your final goal.' (Qur'an 31 : 14).

Muslim marriage is both a sacred act and a legal agreement, in which either partner is free to include legitimate conditions. As a result, divorce, although uncommon, is permitted only as a last resort. Marriage customs very widely from contry to country.



PHOTO : THE INTERIOR VIEW OF SHOPPING MALL IN RIYADH.

Saudi Picnics and Camping

by atufft

Just as Americans and Europeans like to commune with nature, so do the Saudis. For them, the desert is nature, and a puddle of fresh water after a brief rain is heaven. There are no rivers or lakes, just empty desert expanse. Many Saudis have relatively permanent tents complete with electricity, A/C, and satellite TV in their backyards or in designated areas outside of town. The men go, sit around and smoke the waterpipe, play cards, eat dates, and drink the unroasted Arabic coffee. Women gather in a separate tent and share fashions and conversation any women might elsewhere in the world. Family picnics and car camping are also popular, particularly for those with lower incomes. Any desert shrub becomes a shade tree under which a car can be parked.

Muslim tradition and culture

by bzh

Always remember that Saudi Arabia is where Islam was born. As a consequence, the Islamic law is part of everyday life. Non Muslim are expected to know this and respect it. You will usually stay out of trouble if you dress simply, in western clothes. Always wear trousers and long sleeved shirts. Avoid being outside during prayer time. And, of course, be extra vigilant during Ramadan.

Comments

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