Beit Al Mamlouka

5 out of 5 stars5 Stars

Damascus, Syria

4 Reviews

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93%

Satisfaction Excellent
Excellent
77%
64
Very Good
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14
Average
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0
Poor
2%
2
Terrible
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3

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  • Robin020's Profile Photo

    Nice place

    by

    Rooms & Suites

    Rooms offer exceptional grace and comfort and all give views over either the hotel’s central courtyard terrace or the hotel’s terraces. Suites range in size but the largest and most famous is the Suleiman Suite. Large, pampering bathrooms in mosaic style marble and tiles echo the Mamlouk period of the hotel's origins.

    All rooms have a custom-built entertainment that includes a television with satellite channels and the Internet. Rooms are fitted with air-conditioning units for the summer months and a mini-bar.

    Each room has been awarded a different name and is decorated in its own style reflecting the period of history. Below is a little description about the historical significance of each room.

    Description of the rooms:

    Baybars I (1233-1277), Mamluk Sultan of Egypt (1260-1277), originally a Turkish slave who rose to power through military skill. In 1260 he led the Mamluks against the Mongols at the Battle of Ayn Jalut, Palestine. Shortly afterwards he killed the Sultan and assumed supreme control. During his rule Egypt became the most powerful Muslim state in the Middle East.

    Baybars waged a successful war against the Crusaders in Syria and in 1268 put an end to the Norman principality of Antioch. His armies overran Armenia and penetrated deeply into Asia Minor, defeating the Seljuk Turks and remnants of the Assassins (a secret society of Muslims during the Crusades). His power towards the south extended over Nubia and he controlled most of Arabia. His exploits gave rise to many legends, the most famous of which is the Romance of Baybars.

    Ibn Rished “Averros” in Arabic, Abu al-Walid Muhammad ibn Ahmad ibn Muhammad ibn Rushd (1126-98), Spanish-Arab Islamic philosopher, jurist and physician, was born in Cordoba, Spain. His father, a judge in Cordoba, instructed him in Muslim jurisprudence. He studied theology, philosophy and mathematics under the Arab philosopher Ibn Tufayl and medicine under the Arab physician Avenzoar.

    Averros was appointed a judge in Seville in 1169 and in Cordoba in 1171. In 1182 he became chief physician to Abu Yaqub Yusuf, the Almohad caliph of Morocco and Muslim Spain. Averros’ view that reason takes precedence over religion led to his being exiled in 1195 by Abu Yusuf Yaqub al-Mansur. He was released shortly before his death.

    Averros held that metaphysical truths can be expressed in two ways, through philosophy, as represented by the views of Aristotle, and through religion. He rejected the concept of a creation of the world in the history of time; the world, he maintained, has no beginning. God is the supreme creator, the force that stimulates all motion, who transforms the potential into the actual. The individual human soul emanates from the one universal soul.

    Averros' extensive commentaries on the works of Aristotle were translated into Latin and Hebrew. They greatly influenced the Scholastic school of philosophy in medieval Europe and medieval Jewish philosophy. His main independent work was Tahafut al-Tahafut (Incoherence of the Incoherence), a rebuttal of the attack on Neoplatonic and Aristotelian philosophy by the Islamic theologian al-Ghazali. Averros also wrote books on medicine, astronomy, law and grammar.

    Suleyman I, called The Magnificent (1494-1566), a sultan of the Ottoman Empire (1520-1566). During his reign the empire reached its zenith of power and splendour.

    Suleyman was born on November 6, 1494, in Trabzon (Trebizond), the son of Selim I. In 1521, at the beginning of his reign, Suleyman captured the city of Belgrade (now in Serbia). The following year he repelled the Knights of Saint John of Jerusalem, a military and religious order, from the Island of Rhodes in the Aegean Sea. In 1526 he again invaded Hungary, killing Louis II, King of Hungary, and incapacitating the Hungarian army at the Battle of Moha¡cs. He returned to Hungary in 1529 as the supporter of John I Zapolya, who had been elected king by the Hungarian nobility, but whose claim was contested by Archduke Ferdinand of Austria (later Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand I). Ferdinand was driven back into Vienna, which Suleyman then attempted to besiege. He was unsuccessful, thus limiting the extent of his invasion into central Europe.

    Suleyman next directed his arms against Iran. In 1534 he conquered the cities of Tabraz and Baghdad. In 1535 he concluded an alliance with Francis I, King of France, against Holy Roman Emperor Charles V. The treaty opened the commerce of the Levant to the French flag alone and as a result of the agreement diplomatic relations between France and the Ottoman Empire lasted for centuries.

    In 1541 Suleyman again invaded Hungary, capturing Buda and incorporating all of central Hungary into his empire. Two years later the combined French and Ottoman fleets ravaged the Italian coasts and pilled into Nice. The Ottomans were now supreme in the Mediterranean. In 1551 Tripoli fell into their hands. A second and third war with Iran, an unsuccessful siege of Malta in 1565, and another expedition to Hungary in 1566 were the principal events of the later years of Suleyman's reign. He died conquering Szigetva¡r in Hungary on September 7, 1566.

    Suleyman is considered the greatest of Ottoman sultans. He excelled as an administrator, earning the title Kanuni and was an influential patron of the arts and sciences. At his death the Ottoman Empire controlled much of the Balkans, Northern Africa, and the Middle East, and was the ruling power on the Mediterranean Sea.

    Ibn Sina “Avicenna”, Abu Ali al-Husayn ibn Abd Allah ibn Sina, (980-1037), Iranian Islamic philosopher and physician, born near Bukhara (now Uzbekistan). The son of a government official, Avicenna studied medicine and philosophy in Bukhara. At the age of 18 he was rewarded for his medical abilities with the post of court physician to the Samanid ruler of Bukhara. He remained in this position until the fall of the Samanid Empire in 999. After that he travelled and lectured on astronomy and logic at Jurjan, near the Caspian Sea. He spent the last 14 years of his life as a scientific adviser and physician to the ruler of Isfahan.

    Regarded by Muslims as one of the greatest Islamic philosophers, Avicenna is an important figure in the fields of medicine and philosophy. His work The “Canon of Medicine” was used in the Middle East and in Europe as a textbook. It is significant as a systematic classification and summary of medical and pharmaceutical knowledge up to and including Avicenna's time. The first Latin translation of the work was made in the 12th century, the Hebrew version appeared in 1491, and the Arabic text in 1593, the second text ever printed in Arabic.

    Avicenna's best-known philosophical work is Kitab ash-Shifa (Book of Healing), a collection of treatises on Aristotelian logic, metaphysics, psychology, the natural sciences, and other subjects. Avicenna's own philosophy was based on a combination of Aristotelianism and Neoplatonism. Contrary to orthodox Islamic thought, Avicenna denied personal immortality, God's interest in individuals, and the creation of the world in time. Because of his views, Avicenna became the main target of an attack on such philosophy by the Islamic philosopher al-Ghazali. Nevertheless, Avicenna's philosophy remained influential throughout the Middle Ages.

    Harun ar-Rashid (766-809), was the fifth caliph (786-809) of the Abbasid dynasty of Baghdad. He was the son of the third Abbasid caliph, al-Mahdi, and succeeded to the throne on the death of his brother al-Hadi. The period of his reign marked a notable development of culture. Until 803 administrative power was entrusted to Yahya ibn-Khalid (died around 803), the grand vizier, or councillor of state, and head of the illustrious family of the Barmecides. Baghdad, the capital of Harun's realm, became the most flourishing city of the period. Tribute was paid to the caliph by many rulers, and splendid edifices were erected in his honour at enormous cost. He is said to have exchanged gifts with Charlemagne. Harun was a generous patron of learning, poetry, and music, and his court was visited by the most eminent Muslims of the age. He was celebrated in countless songs and stories, and is perhaps best known to the Western world as the caliph whose court is described in the Arabian Nights.

    From 791 to 809 Harun's empire was at war with the Byzantine Empire, and in 807 his forces occupied the Byzantine province of Cyprus. Towards the end of his reign Harun was influenced to depose the Barmecides, and in 803 he imprisoned the grand vizier. The caliph died while on his way to put down an insurrection in the eastern part of his empire.

    Aghia Sophia, also Church of the Holy Wisdom, the most famous Byzantine structure in Constantinople (now Istanbul), built (532-37) by Emperor Justinian I, and now a museum. Its huge size and daring technical innovations make it one of the world's key monuments.

    Unique Quality: Rates

    All room rates are in US Dollars per night and includes breakfast and Tax.

    Special rates until the end of 2012

    Any standard room single occupancy : 60USD

    Any standard room Double occupancy : 80USD

    Suite Ibn Rished or Ibn Sina : 100 USD

    Suite Suleiman or Baybars : 120 USD

    Beit Al Mamlouka

    Tel: (+963 11) 543 0445/46

    Fax: (+963 11) 541 7248

    info@almamlouka.com

    almamlouka@mail.sy

    Directions: Location

    From Damascus Airport:

    30 minutes by car

    Situated in Bab Touma, Qemarieh street , in front of Hammam Bakri, next to Elissar Restaurant

    By Taxi within Damascus

    10 minutes

  • Robin020's Profile Photo

    Nice place

    by

    Rooms & Suites

    Rooms offer exceptional grace and comfort and all give views over either the hotel’s central courtyard terrace or the hotel’s terraces. Suites range in size but the largest and most famous is the Suleiman Suite. Large, pampering bathrooms in mosaic style marble and tiles echo the Mamlouk period of the hotel's origins.

    All rooms have a custom-built entertainment that includes a television with satellite channels and the Internet. Rooms are fitted with air-conditioning units for the summer months and a mini-bar.

    Each room has been awarded a different name and is decorated in its own style reflecting the period of history. Below is a little description about the historical significance of each room.

    Description of the rooms:

    Baybars I (1233-1277), Mamluk Sultan of Egypt (1260-1277), originally a Turkish slave who rose to power through military skill. In 1260 he led the Mamluks against the Mongols at the Battle of Ayn Jalut, Palestine. Shortly afterwards he killed the Sultan and assumed supreme control. During his rule Egypt became the most powerful Muslim state in the Middle East.

    Baybars waged a successful war against the Crusaders in Syria and in 1268 put an end to the Norman principality of Antioch. His armies overran Armenia and penetrated deeply into Asia Minor, defeating the Seljuk Turks and remnants of the Assassins (a secret society of Muslims during the Crusades). His power towards the south extended over Nubia and he controlled most of Arabia. His exploits gave rise to many legends, the most famous of which is the Romance of Baybars.

    Ibn Rished “Averros” in Arabic, Abu al-Walid Muhammad ibn Ahmad ibn Muhammad ibn Rushd (1126-98), Spanish-Arab Islamic philosopher, jurist and physician, was born in Cordoba, Spain. His father, a judge in Cordoba, instructed him in Muslim jurisprudence. He studied theology, philosophy and mathematics under the Arab philosopher Ibn Tufayl and medicine under the Arab physician Avenzoar.

    Averros was appointed a judge in Seville in 1169 and in Cordoba in 1171. In 1182 he became chief physician to Abu Yaqub Yusuf, the Almohad caliph of Morocco and Muslim Spain. Averros’ view that reason takes precedence over religion led to his being exiled in 1195 by Abu Yusuf Yaqub al-Mansur. He was released shortly before his death.

    Averros held that metaphysical truths can be expressed in two ways, through philosophy, as represented by the views of Aristotle, and through religion. He rejected the concept of a creation of the world in the history of time; the world, he maintained, has no beginning. God is the supreme creator, the force that stimulates all motion, who transforms the potential into the actual. The individual human soul emanates from the one universal soul.

    Averros' extensive commentaries on the works of Aristotle were translated into Latin and Hebrew. They greatly influenced the Scholastic school of philosophy in medieval Europe and medieval Jewish philosophy. His main independent work was Tahafut al-Tahafut (Incoherence of the Incoherence), a rebuttal of the attack on Neoplatonic and Aristotelian philosophy by the Islamic theologian al-Ghazali. Averros also wrote books on medicine, astronomy, law and grammar.

    Suleyman I, called The Magnificent (1494-1566), a sultan of the Ottoman Empire (1520-1566). During his reign the empire reached its zenith of power and splendour.

    Suleyman was born on November 6, 1494, in Trabzon (Trebizond), the son of Selim I. In 1521, at the beginning of his reign, Suleyman captured the city of Belgrade (now in Serbia). The following year he repelled the Knights of Saint John of Jerusalem, a military and religious order, from the Island of Rhodes in the Aegean Sea. In 1526 he again invaded Hungary, killing Louis II, King of Hungary, and incapacitating the Hungarian army at the Battle of Moha¡cs. He returned to Hungary in 1529 as the supporter of John I Zapolya, who had been elected king by the Hungarian nobility, but whose claim was contested by Archduke Ferdinand of Austria (later Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand I). Ferdinand was driven back into Vienna, which Suleyman then attempted to besiege. He was unsuccessful, thus limiting the extent of his invasion into central Europe.

    Suleyman next directed his arms against Iran. In 1534 he conquered the cities of Tabraz and Baghdad. In 1535 he concluded an alliance with Francis I, King of France, against Holy Roman Emperor Charles V. The treaty opened the commerce of the Levant to the French flag alone and as a result of the agreement diplomatic relations between France and the Ottoman Empire lasted for centuries.

    In 1541 Suleyman again invaded Hungary, capturing Buda and incorporating all of central Hungary into his empire. Two years later the combined French and Ottoman fleets ravaged the Italian coasts and pilled into Nice. The Ottomans were now supreme in the Mediterranean. In 1551 Tripoli fell into their hands. A second and third war with Iran, an unsuccessful siege of Malta in 1565, and another expedition to Hungary in 1566 were the principal events of the later years of Suleyman's reign. He died conquering Szigetva¡r in Hungary on September 7, 1566.

    Suleyman is considered the greatest of Ottoman sultans. He excelled as an administrator, earning the title Kanuni and was an influential patron of the arts and sciences. At his death the Ottoman Empire controlled much of the Balkans, Northern Africa, and the Middle East, and was the ruling power on the Mediterranean Sea.

    Ibn Sina “Avicenna”, Abu Ali al-Husayn ibn Abd Allah ibn Sina, (980-1037), Iranian Islamic philosopher and physician, born near Bukhara (now Uzbekistan). The son of a government official, Avicenna studied medicine and philosophy in Bukhara. At the age of 18 he was rewarded for his medical abilities with the post of court physician to the Samanid ruler of Bukhara. He remained in this position until the fall of the Samanid Empire in 999. After that he travelled and lectured on astronomy and logic at Jurjan, near the Caspian Sea. He spent the last 14 years of his life as a scientific adviser and physician to the ruler of Isfahan.

    Regarded by Muslims as one of the greatest Islamic philosophers, Avicenna is an important figure in the fields of medicine and philosophy. His work The “Canon of Medicine” was used in the Middle East and in Europe as a textbook. It is significant as a systematic classification and summary of medical and pharmaceutical knowledge up to and including Avicenna's time. The first Latin translation of the work was made in the 12th century, the Hebrew version appeared in 1491, and the Arabic text in 1593, the second text ever printed in Arabic.

    Avicenna's best-known philosophical work is Kitab ash-Shifa (Book of Healing), a collection of treatises on Aristotelian logic, metaphysics, psychology, the natural sciences, and other subjects. Avicenna's own philosophy was based on a combination of Aristotelianism and Neoplatonism. Contrary to orthodox Islamic thought, Avicenna denied personal immortality, God's interest in individuals, and the creation of the world in time. Because of his views, Avicenna became the main target of an attack on such philosophy by the Islamic philosopher al-Ghazali. Nevertheless, Avicenna's philosophy remained influential throughout the Middle Ages.

    Harun ar-Rashid (766-809), was the fifth caliph (786-809) of the Abbasid dynasty of Baghdad. He was the son of the third Abbasid caliph, al-Mahdi, and succeeded to the throne on the death of his brother al-Hadi. The period of his reign marked a notable development of culture. Until 803 administrative power was entrusted to Yahya ibn-Khalid (died around 803), the grand vizier, or councillor of state, and head of the illustrious family of the Barmecides. Baghdad, the capital of Harun's realm, became the most flourishing city of the period. Tribute was paid to the caliph by many rulers, and splendid edifices were erected in his honour at enormous cost. He is said to have exchanged gifts with Charlemagne. Harun was a generous patron of learning, poetry, and music, and his court was visited by the most eminent Muslims of the age. He was celebrated in countless songs and stories, and is perhaps best known to the Western world as the caliph whose court is described in the Arabian Nights.

    From 791 to 809 Harun's empire was at war with the Byzantine Empire, and in 807 his forces occupied the Byzantine province of Cyprus. Towards the end of his reign Harun was influenced to depose the Barmecides, and in 803 he imprisoned the grand vizier. The caliph died while on his way to put down an insurrection in the eastern part of his empire.

    Aghia Sophia, also Church of the Holy Wisdom, the most famous Byzantine structure in Constantinople (now Istanbul), built (532-37) by Emperor Justinian I, and now a museum. Its huge size and daring technical innovations make it one of the world's key monuments.

    Unique Quality: Rates

    All room rates are in US Dollars per night and includes breakfast and Tax.

    Special rates until the end of 2012

    Any standard room single occupancy : 60USD

    Any standard room Double occupancy : 80USD

    Suite Ibn Rished or Ibn Sina : 100 USD

    Suite Suleiman or Baybars : 120 USD

    Beit Al Mamlouka

    Tel: (+963 11) 543 0445/46

    Fax: (+963 11) 541 7248

    info@almamlouka.com

    almamlouka@mail.sy

    Directions: Location

    From Damascus Airport:

    30 minutes by car

    Situated in Bab Touma, Qemarieh street , in front of Hammam Bakri, next to Elissar Restaurant

    By Taxi within Damascus

    10 minutes

  • bad manners in a beautiful hotel

    by

    at first i was really impressed by the heartful friendlyness of the people in the hotel - also by the high grade of service.
    when i got up in the morning and went for breakfast at 7.30 a.m. my luggage was brought downstairs without asking me beforehand while i was in the tearoom.
    when i complained everything was brought upstairs again!
    when i came back from a short shopping trip at 10.30 the whole room was stripped of the towels and bedding!!!!!
    i have never expierienced such rudeness - this is whats happening when people get too busy....

    Directions: christian quarter

  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Luxury Boutique Hotel

    by

    A beautifully restored 17th century Damascus mansion has been converted into an 8-suite luxury boutique hotel called Beit al Mamlouka. The hotel is located near Bab Touma in the Christian Quarter of Old Damascus, a most charming area close to the tourist sites. The hotel is in an authentic Damascene house, built in the city's traditional architectural style and layout, and whose rooms are connected through a central courtyard with an iwan, citrus trees and a fountain. The rooms have preserved their original ornate decorations and are furnished with Syrian antiques. Each room carries a different name of a famous characters from Arab literature and history.

    Unique Quality: Staying at Beit al Mamlouka, one gets to experience true Damascene hospitality first hand in an authentic environment. The extremely friendly staff make your stay special and prepare the most delicious local breakfast. All this luxury comes at a price, of course, particularly over holiday periods, though it is worth every Syrian pound!

    This is the place to stay if you want luxury in Damascus. It is worth noting that Beit al Mamlouka has started the trend of converting old Damascene mansions into boutique hotels. Others such as Talisman and Shahbandar have followed. More to come, I'm sure.

    Directions: Opposite Hammam Bakri near Bab Touma in the Christian Quarter of Old Damascus.

More about Beit Al Mamlouka

best hotel in Syria

by anilegna about al mamlouka

this is a 8 bedroom boutique hotel in the old city 5 minutes stroll through atmospheric lanes to the souqs and Ummayyad mosque, very very nicely decorated and very charming. I stayed at two other hotels after this in Aleppo, & Palmyra and this was I should have seen last coz everything else I was disappointed with. the hotel is also close by Elissar restaurant, one of the best in Damascus only 8 rooms, no pools, but very unique furniture, feels like a rich cousin's house

Palaces of Damascus

by MM212

A plethora of sumptuous old palaces, most dating from the 17th-19th centuries, have intrigued travellers to Damascus for over a century. Traditionally, a wealthy Damascene family would construct a palace or "beit" that carried the family name, e.g. Beit al-Quwatli, Beit Nassan, etc., to house the extended family. Each palace varied in size and splendour depending on the wealth of the family, but all were built in the typical Damascene architectural style with at least one or two central courtyards shaded by citrus trees. All of the rooms or wings were accessed through the courtyard and looked onto it, effectively creating an oasis of calm away from the busy alleys of the old city. While many of these palaces have perished over the years, a large number is now increasingly being restored as museums, hotels or restaurants. The most famous and grandest of all, Beit al-Azem (Azem Palace), is now a museum, but many other palaces are also open to visitors while housing other functions. These include: Beit Akkad (the Danish Institute), Maktab Anbar (government offices), Beit Nizam (banquet hall), and Beit Dahdah (still a residence). Meanwhile Beit al-Mamlouka and Talisman have been converted into luxury boutique hotels and Beit Jabri, Elissar and Leila, among many others, are palaces turned into restaurants. There are rumours that Beit Siba'i (now under restoration) and Beit Nizam will both be converted into boutique hotels. While this trend is ideal for the preservation of these ancient houses, unfortunately it is slowly turning Old Damascus into an open air tourist museum, rather than an authentic residential, cultural and commercial centre.

Forum Posts

Hotels in Damascus Old Town

by Lenihan

Hi, Everybody.

just joined VT. Am a 47 year old American professor, living in Nagoya, Japan with my Spanish profesora wife Maria. Been to 50 countries but never Syria. Will be there on Feb 24th for a week before Maria comes from her hometown Bilbao and would like to stay at a reasonably cheap $20-40 place IN the Old Town. I have spent hours looking in this site and many hotel sights but only found ONE hotel that was actually inside the Old Town. Just want to soak up the atmosphere, maybe visit a school or two if any teachers are out there in Damascus and want a vsiitor, go to the hammams and then when Maria comes we will start our short 12 days of sightseeing in Syria.

So, the question is - Any decent (all I need is a clean bed) old hotels with that ole word - character - in the Old Town? Any help would be nice. (I know all about the Majed, Sultan, etc.)
Thanks a lot. John Lenihan

RE: Hotels in Damascus Old Town

by TheWanderingCamel

Can't vouch for it but the only budget option I know of is the Fursan near Bab Touma in the Christian Quarter of the Old City. Otherwise there is Beit al Mamlouka, which is probably the hotel you've discovered, and expensive. Damascus has yet to get into the conversions of old houses into hotels that you find in Aleppo - there are several new restaurants, but that's it as far as hotels go I think. leyle

Don't know about Damascus

by JeroenvanSeeters

But I'm happy I found my favorite 47 year old professor...!

Let me know how you've been and how I can email you.

would like to catch up. A lot has been going on over here. Hope to speak to you.

Regards,
JEroen
jvanseeters@hotmail.com

RE: RE: Hotels in Damascus Old Town

by Lenihan

Wan Cam

Thanks for the tip. Sounds like a winner. John

RE: RE: Hotels in Damascus Old Town

by TheWanderingCamel

I'd like to hear how you get on. Have always wanted to stay in the Old City but the Mamlouka is way out of my league. I think Syria is wonderful - hope you will too.leyle

RE: Hotels in Damascus Old Town

by malasli

Hi there,
I know of several beautiful old houses in which you can rent rooms in Bab Touma. (Most of them have a guest kitchen and even laundry , but it's not a hotel) The monthly rate for a single should be 120 Dollars now, staying short-term the daily rate out of that will likely be a bit more. (around 10-15 or even less, bagain according to how long you staying etc.) I found them by first going to a budget place outside of the old town, then asking around in the neighborhood. People know eachtother so will be able to tell you. In February there should be plenty of vacancies, so you needn't worry about booking in advance! (Don't have a number except one where you need to speak Arabic anyhow and nobody is ever home...) I used to be approached by people in the street who asked me if I wanted a room.
Enjoy Damascus, it's fabulous!

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 Beit Al Mamlouka

We've found that other people looking for this hotel also know it by these names:

Beit Al Mamlouka Damascus
Beit Al Mamlouka Hotel Damascus

Address: Damascus, Syria