The Peak Hotel

4 out of 5 stars4 Stars

Mesrutiyet Cad Oteller Sok 1/3, Tepebasi, Istanbul, 34430, Turkey

1 Review

The Peak Hotel
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91%

Satisfaction Excellent
Excellent
28%
26
Very Good
38%
35
Average
25%
23
Poor
7%
7
Terrible
1%
1

Value Score Great Value!

Costs 20% less than similarly rated 4 star hotels

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Good For Families
  • Families84
  • Couples76
  • Solo77
  • Business57
  • Ultra modern

    by

    The hotel looks absolutely beautiful from the outside, just next to pera palace, which makes it incredibly easy to reach by taxi, as all taxi drivers know where pera palace is. It takes 60 seconds max to reach istiklal from the hotel, so you will end up walking through istiklal everyday. My room was the most beautiful, with modern furnishing and high tech Designs. The breakfast is out of this world, with traditional Turkish food and regular breakfast food. The staff were really pleasant and helpful. The only thing that was not good but tolerable was room service, towels were not changed daily, bathroom was left wet sometimes, toiletries were not refueled daily. We, even, found a rotten pizza slice behind the cupboards from other customers!

    Unique Quality: The design and furnishing of the room was thing that amazed me when I first entered. The second thing was how close is the hotel to istiklal.

    Directions: Just tell the taxi "Pera palace" and the hotel is next doors! It's a big walk, though, from karakoy station or maybe because I have kids.

More about Istanbul

Photos

Main Gate - Topkapi PalaceMain Gate - Topkapi Palace

Enginar cafe.Enginar cafe.

The Bosphorus BridgeThe Bosphorus Bridge

on the rooftop tarace - our 5th anniversary dinneron the rooftop tarace - our 5th anniversary dinner

Forum Posts

Vangölü Ekspresi train timetable

by Sour

Hi,

I need to know on which day and hour the Vangölü Ekspresi train (from Istanbul to Tatvan)is leaving Haydarpasa railway station?

Thanks a lot,

Florence

Re: Vangölü Ekspresi train timetable

by Sour

Thank you very much for the help!
Last year I took the Dogu Ekspresi from Kars to Istanbul and I got addicted in turkish slow train! I loved that and I want to try a much more longer one!

F.

Re: Vangölü Ekspresi train timetable

by Sirvictor

Tisztelt Uram Magyar Csillagok, Balaton is more beautiful then Van Sea! I was there last september. Please visit my pages about Hungary, Budapest, Estergon, Tekirdag(Rodosto), Kutahya and Izmit.
My sincere and best regards to all Hungarians.
Tosun Saral
President of the Turkish Hungarian Friendship Society in Ankara

Re: Vangölü Ekspresi train timetable

by Sirvictor

Dear Florence, The express departs from Haydarpasha Train Station ( Haydarpasha Tren istasyonu)on the Asian part of Istanbul. Toreach Haydarpasha you must take the ferry from Karakoy (read: Karakoei) on the other side of the famous Galata Bridge near to the Galata Turm. The ferry takes 20 minutes to Haydarpasha. There are 2 faries deparying from Karakoy. one goes direct to haydarpasha the other goes to haydarpasha then to kadikoy (Kadikoei) You must ask the passengers. I advice you to buy a sleeping wagon ticket. Because the travel takes 2 days and 2 nights.maybe 3? If you buy a ticket 1st or 2nd class compartement you will be not alone and will be travelling with unknown passengers. You will not be able to go to the toilette thinking your baggage. On the other hand toilets will be dirty during the long travel. I have done this trip many years ago. It was dirty under every condition. If you buy a sleeping wagon ticket you will be tidy and comfortable. If you are travelling with friends it is OK. One can be a guard while you are away.
On the other hand you will be travelling along a vast and lonesome territory. Egç. The train enters the plain of Mus (read:Mush) in the morning dawn and goes till evening in a fertile plain.
Have a nice trip

Re: Vangölü Ekspresi train timetable

by infinitys

Instead of taking a train,why dont you take a flight and directly come to Van or Mus?It is also not so expensive and much more comfortable as well...

Travel Tips for Istanbul

AYASOFYA - Hagia Sophia

From...

by harunakpinar

AYASOFYA - Hagia Sophia

From the time it was built Haghia Sophia, the Church of Divine Wisdom, has
astonished and entranced all who beheld it, with its great dome symbolising
unattainable infinity. Haghia Sophia was used as a church for 916 years and
as a mosque for 481, so serving as a place of worship for nearly one and a
half millennia. When it was first built it was known as the Megale Ekklesia or
Great Church. After the Turkish conquest it was converted into a mosque, but
continued to be known by the Turkish rendering of its Greek name, Ayasofya.
In 1934, at the wish of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, founder of the Turkish
Republic, the Council of Ministers turned the building into a museum.Haghia
Sophia was constructed by the Byzantine emperor Justinian between 532
and 537. It was the third church of this name on the same site. The first was
a basilica erected on the site of a former Roman temple, and according to the
historian Socrates was dedicated on 15 February 360. It was destroyed by
fire in the year 404 in an uprising against Emperor Arcadius. The second
church was built by Emperor Theodosius II and dedicated on 10 October 415,
only to be burnt down in the Nika Revolt on 13 January 532, during the fifth
year of the reign of Justinian I (527-565).After crushing the revolt Justinian
commanded that a new church be built on a far grander scale than the
previous two.

The chronicler Procopius relates that two architects, Anthemius of Tralles
and Isidorus of Miletus, were appointed for the task. One hundred master
craftsmen, one thousand journeymen, and ten thousand labourers were
employed. Justinian wanted the church to be completed in the shortest
possible time, and sent orders out to all the provinces of his realm
commanding that columns and marbles from ancient cities be sent to .
Istanbul Shiploads arrived from Syria, Egypt and Greece as well as from
Asia Minor.Construction commenced on 23 February 532 and apart from
the decoration was completed in the astonishingly short time of 5 years 10
months and 24 days. The church was dedicated on 27 December 537 at a
magnificent opening ceremony. Justinian drove up to the church in his
victory chariot, and was welcomed in the atrium by Patriarch Menas. The
two men entered the church hand in hand. Justinian was so impressed by
its splendour, that he exclaimed, ‘Thanks be to God for blessing me with the
good fortune of constructing such a place of worship.

At the inauguration one thousand bulls, six thousand sheep, six hundred
stags, one thousand pigs, ten thousand chickens and ten thousand roosters
were sacrificed and alms were distributed to the poor.Haghia Sophia is the
most outstanding example of a domed basilica. The central space has an
area of seven thousand square metres, and is flanked by two aisles, each
divided from the nave by four verd antique columns. These eight columns
were brought from Ephesus, while the eight porphyry columns beneath the
semidomes were brought from Egypt. Altogether the building contains 107
columns, whose capitals are among the finest examples of Byzantine stone
carving. These capitals bear the monograms of the Emperor Justinian and
his wife Theodora.The dome rises to 56.6 metres at its apex, and has a
diameter of 32.37 metres. The original dome collapsed in an earthquake j
ust 22 years after the church was completed, and was rebuilt in 562 by
Isidorus theYounger, nephew of Isidorus of Miletus. Isidorus the Younger
raised the height of the dome by 2.65 metres to lessen its outward thrust.
During the Latin occupation of Istanbul by the Fourth Crusaders between
1203 and 1261, the church was used for Roman Catholic rites.

Emperor Alexius IV was forced to hand over many of the sacred objects
belonging to the church in repayment for debts to the Latins, and these are
now in Venice.he mosaics of Haghia Sophia are exquisite works of art. In
the semidome of the apse is a large mosaic depicting the Mother of God
with the Infant Christ, which makes abundant use of gold and silver. The
dress of Mary is worked in dark blue glass mosaic, and she sits on a
magnificent bejewelled throne reminiscent of an imperial throne. The faces
of mother and infant are entrancingly beautiful.Another mosaic not to be
missed is that above the Imperial Gate showing Leo VI (886-912) bowing
before Christ and asking his sins to be forgiven. A mosaic on the side door
of the inner narthex depicts two emperors with Mary and the Infant Christ.
One of the emperors is Constantine I, shown presenting Mary and Christ
with a model of Constantinople, which was named after him, and the other is
Justinian I, who is presenting a model of the church that he founded. In the
south gallery is the Deisis mosaic and two others depicting Constantine IX
Monomachos and the Empress Zoe (11th century) and John Comnenus II
with his wife Eirene and son Alexius (12th century) respectively. In the north
gallery is the mosaic depicting Emperor Alexander (10th century). Four
minarets were added to the outside of the building at various times after its
conversion into a mosque. The huge buttresses against the exterior walls
were built in the 16th century by the Ottoman architect Mimar Sinan to
support the building, and have enabled it to survive to the present day.

Additions within the church are the mihrap or prayer niche inside the apse,
the bronze lamps to either side of the niche which were brought here from
Buda, and the pulpit and imperial and müezz’sal galleries of carved marble.
The library beyond the south aisle was built by Mahmud I in 1739. All the
additions were designed with the character of the existing building in mind,
the use of marble for the Ottoman additions reflecting the extensive use of
this material in the Byzantine building. The inscriptions in the dome and the
large calligraphic panels bearing the names of God, Muhammed and the four
caliphs are the work of the celebrated 19th century calligrapher, Kazasker
Mustafa Ýzzet Efendi.

Ortakoy

by mehbos37

Ortakoy is a touristic area where you can enjoy dozens of cafes,bars and fish restaurants..
The Ortakoy square is a lovely place to take a stroll,sit and enjoy your tea whilst gazing at Bosphorus..

Turkish Liquor

by H-TownJourneyman

Raki, pronounced "raku", the unofficial liquor of Turkey, is a distilled alcoholic beverage usually consumed straight as a cocktail. It is almost always served chilled, and in a small glass about the size of a shotglass. But it is sipped on, differing from a shot of liquor. It is commonly drank with Turkish "meze", or small appetizer dishes, but is also enjoyed in taverns by itself while chatting with friends. I tried it on several occasions, and being a beer lover, I can say it was not my favorite method of consuming alcohol. But I must say it is not half bad, especially when served really cold!

Yildiz Park

by Lion_Beat

Located between Besiktas and Ortakoy villages, Yildiz Park was the former Imperial Gardens belonging to Royal Family as early as 17th century.

When entering this park you begin to ask yourself if you are still in Istanbul or it's just a dream. Completly out of typical Istanbul views. Sometimes I get the impression I'm in the middle of a forest! :)

When Sultan Abdulmecid wanted to distance himself from the rest of the world, he chose the yildiz gardens where he built his palace and encircled it with double walls. So when you want to distance from the rest of the world thats the place to go!

Visit it, but don't buy anything!

by Greatwalk0 about grand bazaar

The Grand Bazaar is a great place to visit - a "must see" when in Istanbul. That being said, I wouldn't buy anything there. Given the hype surrounding the Grand Bazaar, EVERYTHING is EXTREMELY overpriced. Negotiating is a must, but with the vendors starting off with such outrageous prices, it is difficult to work down to a reasonable price.

All the products found in the Grand Bazaar can be found elsewhere for a fraction of the price. Nothing

Comments

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