Anemon Hotel Manisa

Manisa Girisi Kuva-i Milliye AnIt Mevkii, Manisa, Turkey
Anemon Hotel Manisa
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Travel Tips for Manisa

Manisa City Center

by karaagac

City in western Turkey with more than 200,000 inhabitants, situated just 25 km northeast of Izmir. It is the capital of Manisa province with 1.3 million inhabitants.
Manisa is an attractive, modern city with a far-reaching past in the Aegean region of Anatolia. Its history goes back to 500 BC but the first known settlements date back to the 14th century BC.
The main economic activity of Manisa is agriculture, producing wine grapes, olives, tobacco, sesame and cotton. Among modern industries, Manisa is a wide range of electronics industries. The surrounding lands extract magnesite, zinc and mercury.
Since the great Ottoman Sultans chose Manisa as the training ground for crown princes, there are many examples of Ottoman architecture, as well as Seljuk.

http://goturkey.kultur.gov.tr/destinasyon_en.asp?belgeno=9631&belgekod=9631&Baslik=Manisa

Manisa, city in western...

by Arkeolog

Manisa, city in western Turkey, the capital of Manisa province, located about 30 km (about 20 mi) north east of Izmir, the major Turkish port on the Aegean Sea. The city is situated on the northern slopes of Mount Manisa (Mount Sipylus), by the meandering Gediz River (called the Hermus River in ancient times). Due to its location on the edge of the fertile Manisa plain, agricultural produce has traditionally been the major means of support in the region. The recent development of electronics industries has diversified the city's economy. Manisa has both highway and railway connections to Izmir. The Archeological and Ethnographical Museums (founded in 1935) contain finds and cultural artifacts from the city and its environs. Celâl Bayar University (1992), named after the third president of Turkey, is the only higher education institution in Manisa. The current settlement stands on the ancient city of Magnesia. Found 6 km (4 mi) east of Manisa, a 13th-century BC rock carving of Cybele, the ancient Mother of the Gods, is considered evidence of Phrygian or Hittite presence in the area. Held by Persians, Greeks, Romans, Byzantines, Crusaders, and then Seljuk Turks, Manisa was captured by Ottomans in AD 1405. Manisa became a provincial capital in the newly established Republic of Turkey in 1923. SARD(Sardis)

Sardis, or Sardes, was the capital of the Lydians, a powerful and ancient anatolian civilization in the antiquity who were the inventors of coins as a means of exchange instead of goods. Located on the fertile Meander plains, known as Salihli today, Sardis was a famous centre for trade.

The city suffered a Cimmerian attack in 652 B.C. The Central Asian tribe of Cimmerians literally pulled the city to the ground during the reign of the first Lydian king Gyges. The city survived the onslaught and continued to be indipendendent for centuries. The most famous king of Sardis was hawk king Croesus (561-546 B.C.). Heredotus depicts Croesus' court as a brilliant place visited by all the wise men of Greece. During his reign the wealth of Lydia reached to its peak and the royal treasury in Sardis was filled to its brim with gold. Croesus later became the centre figure of many myths.

Wealth also made the Lydians careless in matters of defence, which weakened with an army consisting only of mercenary soldiers. This was a mistake the Lydians would pay for, since the Persian invasions started and Sardis was to fall into the hand of the Persians and the city was ruled from then on by Satraps (Governor in the Persion language) who ruled the western part of Asia Minor in the name of Darius.

In 498, the subdued Ionian cities in wetsern Asia Minor took part in an uprising under the leadership of Aristagoras of Miletus, receiving considerable military and financial help from Athens and Erethria. The uprise lead to the destruction of Sardis by fire at the hands of the rebels and this incident was seen by many historians, starting with Herodotus, as the primary cause of the Persian Wars.

Two hundred years later, in the second Century B.C. the city, whose glory faded after the fire, fell into the hands of the Romans and, later in the 7th A.D., into the hands of the Byzanthines. The final conquerors of the region (not the city, which was by that time nothing but deserted ruins) were the Turks in the 14th Century.

Although razed down several times, the city still has some remnants standing. Some of the remnants are the castle of Antiochos III., a Roman Gymnasium with a two storey columned facade, baths, a cemetery from the Hellenistic period, and several stunning frescoes and mosaics. The excavations on the site have started recently and are continuing. It may be that you might not be able to see Sardis closely because of ongoing expeditions.

Tarzan of Manisa

by karaagac

Ahmet Bedevi, known as Tarzan of Manisa, was born in 1900 in Baghdad the became a soldier and fought in the War of Independence and was honoured with a medal. He came to the ruined and destroyed Manisa in 1923. Bedevi, whose endeavor in life was to plant trees all over the town, started working at the Municipality as a fireman and a gardener. He became the pioneer and symbol of planting activities. Because of the soft climate of the area, he first wore a vest and trousers and then he started wandering about in the town in his shorts. The people of Manisa saw his resemblance to Tarzan because of his clothes, and always cherished him with love. Tarzan of Manisa lived in the mount Spilylus, ignoring all his individual needs but working for a greener environment. He died on 31st May, 1963. However, he has never been forgotten by the locals; on the contrary, he was immortalised for the things he did for Manisa and people followed his example.

Manisa

by ghislain69

Manisa is an attractive, modern city with a far-reaching past. Its history goes back to 500 BC but the first known settlements date to the 14th century BC. Since the great Ottoman Sultans chose Manisa as the training ground for crown princes, there are many examples of Ottoman architecture, as well as Seljuk. The Sultan Mosque of the 16th-century was built for Ayse Sultan, mother of Suleyman the Magnificent. In her honor, the Mesir Macunu Festival (Spiced Candy which is supposed to restore health, youth and potency) is held every year in March, in the grounds of this mosque. The Muradiye Mosque of the 16th-century was built by the great architect Sinan, and the Murad Bey Medresse now houses the Archaeological Museum of Manisa.

Manisa celebrates the annual Vintage Festival every September, when bringing in the fruits of the vineyards is celebrated with excitement. The vineyards surround the city and provide dry fruit for export and grapes for wine making.

The Spil Mountain National Park is a cool spot with a richly forested area, hot springs and a profusion of flowers, especially wild tulips. There are about 120 kinds of endemic plants here. You may go mountaineering or camping in this area as well as seeing the famous "crying rock" of Niobe, and the carving of Goddess Kybele.

Sardis, in Manisa-Salihli is one of the most remarkable sightseeing areas of Turkey. It is the ancient capital of Lydia, once ruled by King Croesus, who was the first one to use coinage in exchange for goods. Since Sardis encountered earthquakes, most of the remains date back only to Roman times. There are the remains of the temple of Artemis and a restored gymnasium, exhibiting of the past splendor of this ancient city. The splendid Synagogue from the 3rd Century is worth visiting, with its elaborate mosaics and artfully carved colored-stone panels. At Sindelli village there are the fossil foot prints of mankind, belonging to the period of 25-50-century BC.

The ruins of the ancient city of Philadelphia lie in the Alasehir area. Houses at Kula are beautiful examples of Ottoman architecture. For the worshippers of beautiful carpets, Yunt Dagi, Gordes, Kula and Demirci are famous for their precious carpets, rugs and kilims. In addition there are many thermal springs throughout the area.

yakacik's new Manisa Page

by yakacik

Manisa

city, western Turkey.. It lies in the valley of the Gediz River (ancient Hermus River), below Mount Sipylus (Manisa Dagi), 20 miles (32 km) northeast of Izmir. It was called Magnesia ad Sipylum in ancient times, and the Magnetes of Thessaly are thought to have been its first inhabitants in the 12th century BC. It was taken by Cyrus II the Great of Persia in the 6th century BC, and in 190 BC it was the scene of a Roman victory over Seleucid Antiochus III the Great. Under the Attalids of Pergamum in the 1st century AD, it became a flourishing commercial centre, known first as Magnesiopolis and later as Magnesia. Emperor John III Ducas made it the seat of government in 1222. In 1313 Saruhan, a Turkmen tribal chief, captured Magnesia, renamed it Manisa, and made it the capital of his principality until the town was taken over by the Ottoman sultan Bayezid I in 1390. The principality was restored by the central Asian ruler Timur (Tamerlane) following his victory over the Ottomans (1402), but it again fell to the Ottomans about 1410. In the 18th century Manisa was ruled by the virtually independent Karaosmanoglu governors until their power was broken in 1822.

Much favoured by the medieval Ottoman princes and sultans, Manisa has several buildings dating from that period. The mosque Muradiye Cami (built 1583-86), decorated with exquisitely worked marble, glazed tiles, and gilding, is particularly noteworthy. The medrese (religious school) attached to the mosque now houses a local archaeological museum. An important agricultural and commercial centre, Manisa is linked by rail with Afyon and Izmir.

The surrounding region includes the vast plain of Gediz (ancient Hyracanian Plain), north of Manisa, and is especially suited to vine growing. Other crops include olives, tobacco, sesame, and cotton. Some magnesite, zinc, and mercury are mined. Pop. (1985) 127,012.From Britannica.com the reliable source

Manisa is an attractive, modern city with a far-reaching past. Its history goes back to 500 BC but the first known settlements date to the 14th century BC. Since the great Ottoman Sultans chose Manisa as the training ground for crown princes, there are many examples of Ottoman architecture, as well as Seljuk. The Sultan Mosque of the 16th-century was built for Ayse Sultan, mother of Suleyman the Magnificent. In her honor, the Mesir Macunu Festival (Spiced Candy which is supposed to restore health, youth and potency) is held every year in March, in the grounds of this mosque. The Muradiye Mosque of the 16th-century was built by the great architect Sinan, and the Murad Bey Medresse now houses the Archaeological Museum of Manisa.

Manisa celebrates the annual Vintage Festival every September, when bringing in the fruits of the vineyards is celebrated with excitement. The vineyards surround the city and provide dry fruit for export and grapes for wine making.

The Spil Mountain National Park is a cool spot with a richly forested area, hot springs and a profusion of flowers, especially wild tulips. There are about 120 kinds of endemic plants here. You may go mountaineering or camping in this area as well as seeing the famous "crying rock" of Niobe, and the carving of Goddess Kybele.

Sardis, in Manisa-Salihli is one of the most remarkable sightseeing areas of Turkey. It is the ancient capital of Lydia, once ruled by King Croesus, who was the first one to use coinage in exchange for goods. Since Sardis encountered earthquakes, most of the remains date back only to Roman times. There are the remains of the temple of Artemis and a restored gymnasium, exhibiting of the past splendor of this ancient city. The splendid Synagogue from the 3rd Century is worth visiting, with its elaborate mosaics and artfully carved colored-stone panels. At Sindelli village there are the fossil foot prints of mankind, belonging to the period of 25-50-century BC.

The ruins of the ancient city of Philadelphia lie in the Alasehir area. Houses at Kula are beautiful examples of Ottoman architecture. For the worshippers of beautiful carpets, Yunt Dagi, Gordes, Kula and Demirci are famous for their precious carpets, rugs and kilims. In addition there are many thermal springs throughout the area.

with thanks to Mersina.com full of info on Turkey

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