The Jewel Box B&B

4630 Capitola Road, Capitola, California, 95010, United States

More about Capitola

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Travel Tips for Capitola

Soquel Indians

by venteeocho

Capitola is built on the location of an Indian village that existed for more than a thousand years.Native inhabitants, known as the Soquel Indians, were removed to the Mission Santa Cruz when it was established in 1791. Nearly all traces of the Soquel "rancheria" and its culture vanished. In the Mexican Era that followed, the territory became part of the Soquel Rancho granted to Martina Castro and husband Michael Lodge in 1833.
California became a state in 1849 and Santa Cruz County was formed in 1850, shortly before German immigrant Frederick Hihn—a pioneer credited with developing much of the county's early industry—acquired the site of present-day Capitola from the Castro family.

As settlers engaged in logging and agriculture, the beach became a busy shipping point known as Soquel Landing. A wharf built in 1857 was expanded to 1,200 feet a few years later. Gradually, a small fishing colony of Italian immigrants settled at its base.

Drawn by cool mists and the smooth beach at the mouth of Soquel Creek, travelers stopped and often stayed as long as they were permitted. Increasingly, vacationers thirsting for a break from hot weather in the Santa Clara Valley found the seashore inviting for an overnight camp. After roads over the Summit were built and improved in the mid-1860s, word about the sanctuary reached further into the state's interior to places like Hollister, Fresno, Modesto, and Stockton—towns that would in a few years lend their names to the streets of Capitola.

Hihn leased the beach flat to Soquel pioneer Samuel A. Hall in 1869. Hall saw that the landscape that provided refuge from the summer heat could also be profitable. His foresight created the place known now as the oldest resort on the Pacific Coast.

A little bit of History

by venteeocho

Capitola is built on the location of an Indian village that existed for more than a thousand years.Native inhabitants, known as the Soquel Indians, were removed to the Mission Santa Cruz when it was established in 1791. Nearly all traces of the Soquel "rancheria" and its culture vanished. In the Mexican Era that followed, the territory became part of the Soquel Rancho granted to Martina Castro and husband Michael Lodge in 1833.
California became a state in 1849 and Santa Cruz County was formed in 1850, shortly before German immigrant Frederick Hihn—a pioneer credited with developing much of the county's early industry—acquired the site of present-day Capitola from the Castro family.

Drawn by cool mists and the smooth beach at the mouth of Soquel Creek, travelers stopped and often stayed as long as they were permitted. Increasingly, vacationers thirsting for a break from hot weather in the Santa Clara Valley found the seashore inviting for an overnight camp. After roads over the Summit were built and improved in the mid-1860s, word about the sanctuary reached further into the state's interior to places like Hollister, Fresno, Modesto, and Stockton—towns that would in a few years lend their names to the streets of Capitola.

Hihn leased the beach flat to Soquel pioneer Samuel A. Hall in 1869. Hall saw that the landscape that provided refuge from the summer heat could also be profitable. His foresight created the place known now as the oldest resort on the Pacific Coast.

Once Capitola prospered, Hihn took over direct control of the enterprise, and subdivided lots for sale beginning in 1882. Over time, the old camping spot grew into "Capitola by the Sea", a vacation spa with a 160-room hotel, hot salt-water baths, and trolley service from Santa Cruz.

Capitola's community of permanent residents stepped forward to guide Capitola in the following decades. The village became the third city in Santa Cruz County after an incorporation election in January 1949.

A hidden gem in Santa Cruz county

by tvdandy

"A true escape from crazy"

What a gem this place is. This seaside village has the best beaches in the county, with a wonderful laid back vibe. A true community beach with a fantastic village to stroll through for great restaurants, galleries, shops and wine tasting bars. Very casual, very friendly. A great place to rent a summer condo and get to know your neighbors. How safe was this place, well the two cops I seen we're on wheel chairs. A place to truely unwind without the crazier party scene of Santa Cruz as well as no homeless problems of that city.

"Sunset Capitola Beach"

Capitola

by trvlrtom

"Beaches and surfing"

Capitola is an interesting and fun little town on the coast. I worked here for two years and still visit it frequently. Two big draws are the beaches and the surf scene. The village of Capitola has a great location on the coast, facing a fine beach that has relatively calm waters and a mild climate for the central California coast. Just a little north of the village at Pleasure Point you will find one of the most popular surfing locations. Here novice and expert surfers spend endless hours watching and waiting for the ultimate wave. Just as many or more people watch the scene from the cliffs above.

"Shopping"

Capitola has three primary locations for shopping, each very different from the other.
First there is the village, which faces the beach. Here you will find a variety of shops, restaurants and bars that are fairly unique and give the place a good character. The chain stores are not here, rather local shops selling clothes, gifts, artwork and things like that.
Next is Pleasure Point, the center of the surf scene. The scene is very casual here, with less expensive places to eat, surf shops and second hand clothing stores. It's quite ecclectic.
Lastly is Capitola mall. This is similar to malls throughout the US, with familiar clothes, stores and places to eat. Personally I see no reason to go here unless you live in the area and just need to get basic things.

"Entertainment and eating."

For a town of its size, Capitola has a great variety of places to eat. There are inexpensive taquerias, good Asian food, and some very fine restaurants too. Look around the village, 41st near Portola and all along 41st.

Capitola - California's Oldest Seaside Resort

by matthieuxjames

"Capitola by the Sea"

A city of only about 10,000 people, Capitola is just south of Santa Cruz. A favorite tourist spot in summer, with numerous hotels, nightclubs, and restaurants. Every year, the Capitola Art & Wine Festival takes place, with hundreds of artists present and showing their creations, and at least a dozen or so wineries offering their best wines up for sampling by those lucky passersby.

"Capitola's Mediterranean Look"

Narrow streets and multi-storied homes are the norm here. Quite a different look to this city (and a different crowd) than what you'll find in Santa Cruz. Capitola, especially on weekends, has lots of yuppies cruising about in everything from Alfa Romeos to Z cars, but almost no place to park a car. Be prepared to walk a ways.

"A little friend I met high above the water"

Walking on the train trestle, high above Soquel Creek, I happened upon this little fellow. We were both enjoying the sunshine this afternoon and neither of us were in any mood to fly ; ) The trestle offers a great view of the city and the beach, but I'm falling short of recommending it here because of the danger involved in traversing its thin wooden planks.

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