Sequoia National Park Hotels

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  • Basaic profile photo Basaic
  • Reviews: 7790
Various: Lodging In and Near the Park

There is lodging available at Wuksachi Village, a private resort at Silver City Mountain and a number of options in Kings Canyon National Park, Giant Sequoia National Monument and surrounding areas. I did not stay here but I stayed one night each at a below average Days Inn in Fresno and a nice independent motel, the Oakhurst Lodge, in Oakhurst.

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Related to: Family Travel, National/State Park, Road Trip
  • Written October 12, 2012
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Kings Canyon Lodge, Kings Canyon NP

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  • Basaic profile photo Basaic
  • Reviews: 7790
Various: Camping In and Near the Park

There are seven camping areas inside Sequoia National Park: Three in the Foothills Area and two each in the Mineral King and Lodgepole Areas.There are also a number of options for camping in Kings Canyon National Park, Giant Sequoia National Monument and surrounding areas.I did not camp here but wanted to let you know what is available.

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Related to: National/State Park, Camping, Family Travel
  • Written October 12, 2012

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  • richiecdisc profile photo richiecdisc
  • Reviews: 5929

5 out of 5 starsUser Rating

4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

Dorst Campground: give peace a chance

It was set in a beautiful forest and we lucked out and got a great spot that was backed by a stream and ample trees all around us. It was just gorgeous but sadly the neighbors we did have, across the small camp road and even downhill from us were so loud, it was not as nice as it should have been. It was 4th of July weekend but you might think that those coming all this way to commune with nature might be a bit more quiet and respectful of their neighbors.

There are quite a few campgrounds in both Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks as befits a park of this size and popularity. We camped for two nights at the Dorst Campground in Sequoia which is in the northernmost part of the park as we had entered from that side and it made tactical sense with regard to what we wanted to see. The campground has 204 sites but with many loops off the main campground road, and well-spaced sites, it did not feel so big. It costs $20 per night which is great value considering how big the spots are. Restrooms were nothing fancy and we had a fair walk to get to ours but often times the best spots are farthest from the amenities. Bear boxes are not only provided but you must utilize them. ALL food and scented items must be removed from your car and placed in them as bears in this area are adept at breaking into cars and do it as a matter of routine if there is something they smell of interest. Rustic wooden picnic tables fit right into the environment and make for a very cosy camping experience

  • Opinion of Price: least expensive
  • Related to: Camping, National/State Park, Road Trip
  • Written October 6, 2009
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gorgeous spots at Dorst


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  • ampcarlos profile photo ampcarlos
  • Reviews: 33

4 out of 5 starsUser Rating

2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

Sequoia Village Inn: Chalet and cottage accomodations

We went up with my husbands parents, siblings and their kids. It is very close to the entrance of the park which was very convenient. We had the Blossom (his parents), Columbine (his sis, bro-in-law and 2 kids) and the Glacier (his sis, bro-in-law, 1 kid, 2 teenagers). We stayed in the glacier and it was very nice. Clean! You should check out the website. There's a lot of info and pictures of each chalet and cottage. The people who run it are very nice and very helpful. The rates vary with the seasons and with how many occupants in the cottages and chalets.

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Related to: National/State Park, Family Travel
  • Written June 11, 2007

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  • Tom_Fields profile photo Tom_Fields
  • Reviews: 2352

5 out of 5 starsUser Rating

Buckeye Tree Lodge: Lodging in Three Rivers

If you want to stay near but not in the park, thereby saving some serious money, and have the amenities of civilization, then Three Rivers is the place to be. The Buckeye Tree Lodge is on the road to the Ash Mountain Entrance, along the beautiful Kaweah River, near restaurants and gas stations. It's relatively affordable, and located just outside the park. In short, it offers the best of all possibilities.

Outside of the park, this is the best location. It also has a nice restaurant and bar right next door.

  • Opinion of Price: less expensive than average
  • Written April 19, 2007
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The Buckeye Tree Lodge

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  • Suzie3 profile photo Suzie3
  • Reviews: 82

4 out of 5 starsUser Rating

Bearpaw meadow camp: Oasis in the mountains

What a wonderful surprise! The tents were very comfortable and spread out on the side of a hill. The wood heated hot water shower was better than my shower at home. The food just kept coming. They all laugh about how people end up gaining weight even with all the hiking.

Boxed wine and lemonade available. You pay per glass for the wine. We all brought bottles of liquor. If you want beer, keep in mind that you will have to haul it up into the mountains yourself.....all twelve miles.

Everything is kept spotlessly clean to keep the wildlife at bay.

Fairly expensive for a camp but keep in mind what it takes to get anything up there.

There are campgrounds nearby if you have a tent.

Great food, breathtaking views.

  • Opinion of Price: more expensive than average
  • Related to: Camping, Hiking and Walking, National/State Park
  • Written October 21, 2006
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My son and girlfriend

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  • mmyerspa profile photo mmyerspa
  • Reviews: 67

3 out of 5 starsUser Rating

Sierra Lodge: Launch or end your trip from Three Rivers

If you're coming to or from the south (Los Angeles), I would recommend a one night stay in Three Rivers on the way in or out of the park...but stay inside the park during the rest of your stay.

Old but clean. Building was well built, but the beds need to be replaced. Office staff was friendly. Small (about 25 rooms), which provides a good family atmosphere.

The hotel is on the far end of Three Rivers - close to the park entrance. But beware - although the park entrance is only a few miles away, it's actually about an hour's drive to the Sequoias from here. You'll pass Tunnel Rock and Moro Rock on the way.

There is a small pool as well. Choose one of the suites or room #7 or #8 for families wanting to be close to the pool. Rooms 7 and 8 are just across the driveway from the pool - so all the pool noise will not reach your room.

  • Opinion of Price: about average
  • Related to: Road Trip, National/State Park, Family Travel
  • Written August 6, 2006
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room 7

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  • mikelisaanna profile photo mikelisaanna
  • Reviews: 991

3 out of 5 starsUser Rating

2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

Buckeye Tree Lodge: Buckeye Tree Lodge

The Buckeye Tree Lodge is a small motel located very close to the southern entrance to Sequoia National Park on Route 198. The rooms aren't fancy, but were comfortable, with a TV, phone, mini-refrigerator and small table. Our daughter loved the swimming pool. The Kaweah River, a small river (really more of a large creek), runs behind the hotel. The desk clerk was very friendly and helpful. The motel next door to the Buckeye Tree Lodge (I can't remember the name of that motel) has an excellent restaurant with a pleasant outdoor deck overlooking the river.

  • Opinion of Price: about average
  • Related to: National/State Park, Road Trip
  • Written May 8, 2005
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The Buckeye Tree Lodge motel


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  • asufan profile photo asufan
  • Reviews: 7

5 out of 5 starsUser Rating

2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

Lodgepole Campground: Camping in Sequoia

Lodgepole is the best camping spot in the park. Reservations are required during the Summer season. The campground is split into two sides by the Kaweah River. My favorite site is #202 (it is very private and away from other campers).

Lodgepole is very centrally located for all daytrips in Sequoia. There is a market and visitors center within walking/biking distance from the campsites.

Well maintained and right on the river. A fun spot to camp.

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Related to: Family Travel, National/State Park, Camping
  • Written April 2, 2005

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  • goingsolo profile photo goingsolo
  • Reviews: 2750

2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

Campgrounds: Camping in Sequoia

Sequoia National Park has seven campgrounds, three of which are open all year:

In the Foothills area, there's Potwisha, Buckeye Flat and the more primitive South Fork. Potwisha and South Fork are open all year and Buckeye is open from late May until October.

In the Mineral King area, Atwell Mill and Cold Springs are open from late May until the end of October. These campgrounds lack restroom facilities.

In the Lodgepole area, Lodgepole and Dorst are open May through September.

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Written September 5, 2004
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Sequoia National Park


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  • awayhome profile photo awayhome
  • Reviews: 197

3 out of 5 starsUser Rating

4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

Montecito Sequoia Resort: A wooded mountain resort

Can't really describe our stay since we didn't stay there. I will say that this place is located on its own secluded wooded site adjacent to a small lake. It looks like an assortment of rustic cabins and lodgings that offer visitors a variety of outdoors activities. It may be a nice place to stay but my one chance encounter with an employee left me feeling like I'd rather avoid this place than stay here. He wasn't too happy that I drove 20 yards down their dirt road to photograph the lakeside.

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Written May 31, 2004
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Entrance to the resort


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  • awayhome profile photo awayhome
  • Reviews: 197

4 out of 5 starsUser Rating

4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

Wooded Campground: Lodgepole Campground

We ended up staying at a large campground in the heart of Sequoia National Park called Lodgepole. There are over a hundred campsites that accomodate tents and a few that accomodate trailers. The campsites are located in a grove of tall Sequoia trees adjacent to the Kahwea river with a few sites offering a great view of the Tokopah Falls.

The views from this campground are spectacular & the surrounding scenery makes this place worth the $20 a night fee. Families may also be interested in the fact that the capground has a full service market, gift shop, cafe, post office, visitor center, laundry, and most importantly showers! This may sound like an overdone campground but I assure you that the surroundings will still allow you to feel like you are rouging it in the wilds of California. There are wild bears, deer, & coyote that roam the grounds so this place isn't all that civilized.

  • Opinion of Price: about average
  • Related to: Hiking and Walking, National/State Park, Camping
  • Written May 31, 2004
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McKinley in his tent at Lodgepole


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  • Svetobeznik profile photo Svetobeznik
  • Reviews: 36

3 out of 5 starsUser Rating

Crystal Springs Campground: Sequoia National Park

Campgrounds range from warm foothills to cool forests, some are opena all year. Only Lodgepole and Dorst Creek accept reservations for summer, call 1-800-365-2267 . Lodgeple , Grant Grove and Atwell Mill campgrounds are near sequoias.

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Related to: Road Trip, Work Abroad, National/State Park
  • Written September 14, 2003
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  • Sequoia profile photo Sequoia
  • Reviews: 8
Staying longer than a daytrip?

Want a hotel room? Best to make reservations long in advance for the warmer months. Same with campsites as camping is permitted only in designated campgrounds outside the "backcountry" areas of the park.

Wuksachi Village: (888) 252-5757

Campsite reservations: (800) 365-2267
Facilities at the campsites will vary. Cost ranges from $12-20 per day.

No RV hookups

Backcountry permits and trail entry reservations info: (559) 565-3766.
There is a $15 fee being instituted for hiking parties.

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Related to: National/State Park
  • Written July 29, 2003

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  • grandmaR profile photo grandmaR
  • Reviews: 6594

3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

The Grant Grove Cabins: Cabins in the snow

We visited around the beginning of April, and there was still skiing in the park because there was a considerable snow pack on the ground. We stayed in a cabin near Grant Grove and we had to go through snow tunnels that were over our heads to get to the cabin. I couldn't take a picture of it because all a picture would have shown was snow.

I don't remember whether the cabin had a bathroom or not, but I remember that the only heat there was a wood stove.

We had a bear come up on the porch and try to get into the cabin one night.

Duplex Bath Cabin
$105 + tax Open year-round
Single Bath Cabin $112 + tax Open year-round
Deluxe Rustic Cabin $60 + tax Open May 22 - Sept 20
Standard Rustic Cabin $55 + tax Open May 22 - Sept 20
Tent Cabin $45 + tax Open June 12 - Aug 31

*Rates are per night, based on double occupancy. Children 12 and under stay free in room with adult(s). Additional person charge is $12 per night. Rates subject to change with National Park Service approval.

  • Opinion of Price: less expensive than average
  • Related to: Hiking and Walking, National/State Park, Family Travel
  • Written April 24, 2003
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picture of cabin from park website


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