Scottish Inns Frederick

1015 S Main Street Tillman, Frederick, OK 73542
Scottish Inns Frederick
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More about Frederick

Photos

Boll weevil trap for monitoring infestationBoll weevil trap for monitoring infestation

Combine cutting wheatCombine cutting wheat

Model of a cotton gin at the museumModel of a cotton gin at the museum

Sprinkler irrigation creates a rainbowSprinkler irrigation creates a rainbow

Travel Tips for Frederick

Paving with bricks

by rexvaughan

In my hometown of Frederick, there are a few streets that were paved with brick rather than concrete or asphalt. What is strange to me is that they were not more widespread as they seem to last forever. The one in the photo is S 14th Street where my parents lived for several decades. One of my uncles worked with the brick laying crew when it was built in the early 20th C and it has held up with almost no maintenance required. Why don't we do that more often rather than constantly patching and resurfacing?

Special bricks

by rexvaughan

For years my father was the park superintendent for Frederick. Sounds good but he was basically the only one in charge of maintenance for the parks. He took pride in them and worked hard to keep them looking good. When Memorial Park was given some renovation a few years ago, people purchased bricks to pave the area surrounding the flagpole. It is not a huge area but I am proud to say that my family is well represented in the several various members purchased in memory of other family members whose home this little town had been.

The park's main entrance is on 15th Street and Grand Avenue.

How much ice do you need today?

by rexvaughan

This custom is not still being used since the advent of electric refrigerators and the demise of the old fashioned "ice box." It was called an ice box for a reason which was that, while it was thick-walled and insulated, it was a big box the contents of which were cooled by a block of ice in it. In those days ice was delivered by small trucks to individual homes. The sign in the photo was put in your front window if you wanted ice that day and you rotated the sign to indicate the size (in pounds) of block you wanted. It was always great for us kids when the ice truck came around in the summertime. The ice was in 100 pound slotted slabs and the ice man would have to use a pick to separate it along the slots. Invariably there were chunks of ice that splintered off and most ice men would pass them on to the waiting bunch of kids. What a great "snack" in hot, hot Oklahoma in July!

The photo is from the Pioneer Heritage Townsite museum.

Agriculture is King

by rexvaughan

This area's economy is largely based on agriculture with wheat and cotton being the primary crops. There is also a significant amount of livestock - pigs and cattle, both beef and dairy. As I was growing up, the county was covered with family farms which these days are under larger management and control. When I was a child it was not unusual during wheat harvest to see truckloads of wheat lined up for over a mile to get unloaded at the grain elevators. As a youth I even picked cotton - back breaking work which I do not recommend. Getting cotton from the field into your shirt is not a short or simple process. In the old days, cotton was picked (pulling the cotton from the bolls) or bolls were pulled (pulling the whole pod off) and in both cases put into a long canvas bag strapped to your shoulder and trailing 5 or 6 feet long behind you. These days machines called cotton strippers move through and take it all in in one fell swoop. The cotton then has to be ginned, a process that separates the fiber from the shell and seed. Then it goes to a compress where it is compressed into bales for shipping. I haven't followed it beyond this but assume somewhere it has to be spun into threads, died and then woven into fabric.

My Home Town

by rexvaughan

"How we got our name"

This is the town where I was born and raised. It is not on anyone's 'must see' list but has an interesting history. The story goes that when the railroad decided to combine the towns of Hazel and Gosnell for a station, the major stockholder in the rail company told the new town he would give them a flagpole if they named the town after his son Frederick. This was done but the flagpole was not forthcoming and the gentleman died in 1908. His son never visited Frederick but led a colorful life including several stints in sanitariums, a brief racing career in a Stutz-bearcat at Indianapolis, some period of time in the British army in WWI where he was wounded, had his wife arrested and tried for bigamy and finally died at age 45 of a cerebral embolism. The original rail company had been sold to the Frisco Railroad, and 60 years after the original promise they did indeed give the city a flagpole which now stands in Pioneer Park, the local museum grounds.

"Miss Oklahoma"

Frederick's economy is based pretty much on agriculture but there is a good bit of civic pride and when one of their own makes the news, it is a big deal. Here you see that one of the local girls is Miss Oklahoma. Never mind the fact that she is really from Grandfield, a smaller town in the same county.

"The earth is flat"

You may have heard the term 'Great Plains' but you may not know how flat and treeless much of this part of the country is. Here is a prime example of it - a photo taken a few miles west of Frederick. The land can appear barren but is part of what used to be called 'The Breadbasket of the US' as wheat is one of the primary crops of the area. It is fairly productive even though it looks like the world headquarters for the Flat Earth Society. A Georgia friend of mine used to say that there were so few trees in Oklahoma that the dogs had to line up and take a number.

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Scottish Inns Frederick

1015 S Main Street Tillman, Frederick

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