Super 8 South Boston

1040 Bill Tuck Highway, Hwys 58 & 360, South Boston, Virginia, 24592, United States
Super 8 South Boston
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75%

Satisfaction Average
Excellent
44%
17
Very Good
21%
8
Average
10%
4
Poor
10%
4
Terrible
13%
5

N/A

Value Score No Data

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Good For Families
  • Families75
  • Couples20
  • Solo57
  • Business66

More about South Boston

Photos

South Boston, VirginiaSouth Boston, Virginia

Trinity Episcopal Church main entranceTrinity Episcopal Church main entrance

Halifax-South Boston MuseumHalifax-South Boston Museum

Main Street: 24 November 2006Main Street: 24 November 2006

Travel Tips for South Boston

Buildings on Lower Main Street

by b1bob

I have been walking in downtown South Boston since I could walk, but, sadly, I never bothered to look up. I recently discovered how much I was missing:

1. The Planters and Merchants Bank at 209 Main Street (now an antique shop called Enchanted Surroundings) is the most notable late 19th century commercial building in South Boston. It is one of the most deluxe designs in the commercial area and clearly reflects the accomplishment of the tobacco planters and merchants who founded it. It consists of a recessed, two-storey central block with one-storey wings with semi-hexagonal exteriors on each side. The central block is highlighted by a cast-iron false front featuring ornate panels, moulded cornices, and a central base inscribed with P & M Bank 1891.

2. The E. L. Evans Building at 225-227 Main Street (home to the Bistro 1888 restaurant) is among the most eye-catching buildings of the period and probably the oldest surviving example of its kind. When it was built in 1888, the building was easily the most beautiful storefront in South Boston. A decorative pressed brick cornice, the centre with E. L. Evans 1888. sets the two-storey building apart. It is basically a Victorian Italianate brick building characterised by prominent brick supports, panels, corbeled cornices, and heavy semi-circular window heads. Fortunately, the building still keeps to its original design.

3. Across the street at 234 Main Street is a building that was a bar, hotel, drugstore, and bus station. It is now Sullivan's Antiques. It is interesting to note that just before prohibition, between 1900 and 1920, there were seven bars located on the west side of the Main Street. Ladies would never walk on that side of the street.

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Houses on Jeffress Street

by b1bob

My grandma Terry lived over on Fenton Street. I would often take the dog for a walk down Fenton past the lodge, up Jeffress, and Yancey rounding out the trip. It's hard to believe so many grand homes were along the short route.

1. 1313 Jeffress Street Built in 1896 by James Traver (builder of the Dan River Covered Bridge and many other bridges, homes and buildings between 1856 and 1907) for the Throm family. Mr. Throm was associated with Singleton Lumber Co. which, until 1959, was located where Southern States is now located on Factory Street.

2. The house on 1328 Jeffress Street is a folk Victorian built by Colonel Henry Easley in 1896 as a wedding gift for his daughter Annie and Dr. Humphrey Singlet Belt. It features a spindlework porch. Lt. Col. Edward Trice, great grandson of Capt. Jeffress, lives here now. Note that Dr. H. S. Belt's name is engraved in the sidewalk in front of this house. My second cousin John Sibley who ran an aluminum siding business in town lived and raised his sons there.

3. This house on 1352 Jeffress Street Built in 1888 on land bought from Capt. Jeffress by Charles Thomas Lovelace. Governor and Mrs. William M. Tuck later lived here. Mrs. Tuck was Mr. Lovelace's daughter.

4. This Queen Anne house on1358 Jeffress Street has an 8-bay wraparound porch and slender Ionic columns. Dr. William Peter Lacy, the first of three generations of dentists to practice in South Boston, built this house before the turn of the century.

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Houses on Washington Street

by b1bob

1204 Washington Avenue The E. L Evans House is a fine representative example of the Queen Anne style. It was built in 1892 by Edward L. Evans, the impressive residence has elabourately detailed porches, and pressed-brick ornamentation. It is unusual for its porches, wide central passage plan, and combination of different building materials including weatherboards, wood shingles, and pressed brick. This house had the first sidewalk and the first central heating system in South Boston. it was occupied until recently by the two daughters of Mr. Evans, a former mayor of South Boston in the 1890s. The current owners are the first owners outside the Evans family. It will always be the E.L. Evans home. E. L. Evans owned a lumber mill and was the mayor of South Boston at one time. I like the design and craftsmanship in the house, but I wish they would revert the paint job back to the original dark red with dark green trim. As it is, the house looks like a giant blackberry ice cream sundae.

1002 Washington Avenue The Noblin House is one of the most impressive Queen Anne style houses in South Boston. The well-preserved frame dwelling features a 13-bay wraparound porch with turned posts and decorative sawnwork, turned balustrade, spindle frieze, 2nd-story single-bay porch; 3-level comer tower topped by a belicast roof, stained glass windows and wooden shingles of various shapes and patterns. A central front gable has decorative woodwork, a Palladian window, and is curiously decorated with a series of wooden bullseye blocks. Richard R. Noblin, Sr. completed the residence in 1893. It remained in the family until the late 1890s. Mr. Noblin was a tobacco warehouseman, a member of the Virginia House of Delegates, and was elected to the state Senate, but died before he could serve. The house is now owned by Carrington Powell (of Powell Funeral Home) and his wife Sally Ann. Before the funerals of each of my grandparents, Sally Ann hosted a luncheon here. en español, em português

Yancey House

by b1bob

The Yancey House on 509 Yancey Street is the oldest house in South Boston. Capt. E. B. Jeffress built it about 1840 after he gave up farming on the frequently flooded south side of the river. In 1871 he gave his house to one of his daughters (he had 11 children). The first daughter was born in the upstairs room of the home. E. B. Jeffress, father of South Boston, built another house which is now part of the American Legion building on Jeffress Street. One daughter married Patrick Henry Yancey; thus the street's name. The garage is an original outbuilding. During World War II, the son of the family, Watt Baptist, flew over the house to wave at his mother. But the plane crashed into the backyard, killing both the pilot and his mama. This house changed hands and was again remodeled in about 1950.

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Evidence of revitalisation

by b1bob

At one point in the early 1990s, Downtown South Boston looked to be down and out. Key businesses like Leggett's, J.J. Newberry, Carroll's, Fuller's, and Faulkner & Lawson's drug store closed. Downtown appeared to be destined to fall victim to neglect like the architecturally beautiful, but abandoned, buildings at Virgilina's crossroads. However, after the turn of the century, efforts were made to lure businesses back downtown. Sadly, we could not revive the lost old businesses, but different ones moved in. With the notable exception of the Legett's and Newberry's buildings, the empty slots are pretty much filled. There is a wine shop on Main Street and even an upmarket restaurant, not to mention a good number of antique and gift shops. Also, South Boston decided to retrovate (accent the old architecture which makes Downtown pleasing to the eye, even more so if you care to look up). They even have park benches with the new South Boston logo which includes the emblem of the bell tower of the old fire house. South Boston hasn't bounced all the way back, but it's getting there!

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 Super 8 South Boston

We've found that other people looking for this hotel also know it by these names:

Super Eight South Boston
South Boston Super 8
South Boston Super Eight

Address: 1040 Bill Tuck Highway, Hwys 58 & 360, South Boston, Virginia, 24592, United States