Grand Teton National Park Hotels

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  • Reviews: 1083

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Signal Mountain Lodge: On the Shore of Jackson Lake

Signal Mountain Lodge is the only lakeside lodging in Grand Teton, however, this does not mean that your accommodation overlooks the lake and the Teton Range. Most do not offer you this grand view, however, you are so close, that you can walk down to the lake when ever you wish to enjoy the view. The accommodations in Signal Mountain have three or four units per building, and are two story. There are eight styles to choose from, each with a private bath, and electric heat. Pets are allowed in most of these, but there is a $15 extra charge per night. Rollaway beds are also available for an extra fee. All rooms are non-smoking.

The least expensive is the One Room Rustic Log Cabins. These rustic looking rooms do not have a view of the lake or the Teton Mountains. The rooms can sleep from 2 to 6 people, depending on the number and size of beds that are in your room.

The Two Room Rustic Log Cabins come in five sizes, and sleeps 4 to 6 people, depending on the number and size of beds in your unit. These rustic looking accommodations do not have a lake or Teton Mountain view.

The Country Rooms are a motel style, and not as rustic looking as the first two that I mentioned. They have a small refrigerator, microwave, coffee pot, and contain either two queen sized beds, or one king size bed. Again, these do not have a mountain or lake view.

The Delux Country Rooms have two rooms, a bedroom with a king sized bed, and a small sitting area with a gas fireplace. There is also a small refrigerator, microwave, and coffeepot. These do not have a lake or Teton Mountain Range view.

The Bungalows come in a one room or a two room style, and do not have mountain or lake views. There is only one of each style available. The one room bungalow has a king sized bed, and a sofa bed, plus a small refrigerator, microwave, and a coffee maker. The two room bungalow has a bedroom with two queen sized beds, and a sitting room. The sitting area has a sofa bed, and a kitchenette which contains a stove with oven, small refrigerator, microwave, and coffee maker. There is only a limited number of cookware and flatware in the accommodation, so I suggest you discuss this when making your reservations, as you may want to bring some of your own. The two bungalow accommodations share an outside deck with two picnic tables.

The Lakefront Retreats are the only units that overlook the lake and have a view of the Tetons. These have a bedroom and a living area. The living area has a sofa bed, and a kitchenette with a microwave, full sized refrigerator, two-burner stove (no oven), and a coffee maker. Again, like the bungalow, there is a limited amount of cookware and flatware supplied with the accommodation. The upper level lakefronts have two queen sized beds and a sofa bed, plus an outside semi-private balcony. The lower level lakefronts have either two queen sized beds and a sofa bed, or one king sized bed and a sofa bed, plus a shared porch.

The Home Away from Home is the most expensive choice at Signal Mountain, and there is only one of these. This is a three room cabin, which consists of one bedroom, a living room, and a kitchen. The bedroom has two queen sized beds, and the living room has a sofa bed, and a gas fireplace. There is also a laundry area next to the kitchen. Again there is limited cookware and flatware. Sadly, being the most expensive, and most complete cabin, you would expect to have a lake and Teton Mountain view, but it does not.

Restaurants, boat rentals, lake cruises, guided fishing trips, a gift store, coin laundry, and a camping store are all nearby. There is wireless internet at Signal Mountain. This is also a perfect spot to watch the sun set behind the Grand Teton Mountain range.

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Related to: Road Trip, National/State Park
  • Written January 8, 2011
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The Main Lodge Building Sits on Jackson Lake

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Colter Bay Cabins and Tents: Lodging in Colter Bay Village

In Colter Bay Village, you will find 166 log cabins available for your overnight stays. These are rustic log cabins, although most contain more than one guest accommodation. There are three choices to choose from.

The most inexpensive is the Semi-Private Cabins, which do not have a private bath. These share a bathroom with other visitors down a common hall. These cabin rooms come with either two twin beds, or one double bed. The rooms are too small to fit a rollaway bed in, so basically these only sleep two people.

The Private One-Room accommodations are cabin rooms with a private bathroom that contains a shower. There are three choices in this style of cabin. One choice is a room that contains one double bed and sleeps two people. Another is a room that sleeps three, with one double bed, and one twin bed. The third choice sleeps up to 6 people. This third choice has two double beds, and a twin bed. You may add an optional single
rollaway bed for the sixth person.

The most expensive choice within Colter Bay Village is the Private Two-Room Cabins. These are the largest cabins, and each have two bedrooms with one bathroom. There are two cabin choices with this option. The first has one double bed in one room, and two twin beds in the other room. You may add rollaway beds to sleep up to 6 people. The other Private Two-Room cabin has two double beds in each room, and rollaways can be added to sleep up to 10 people.

See my other photos for other examples of the cabins.

Although I did not see these, there are also tent cabins offered in Colter Bay. This would be your most inexpensive option. These are part tent and part cabin, having two log walls, with the other two walls and ceiling being constructed of canvas. If you choose this option you would want to bring some of your own camping gear, including your own bedding. There are a limited amount of sleeping bags available for rent at the office, however, there are not enough if every camper wanted one, so if you have one please bring your own. The tent cabins have four bunks that pull down from the walls. For an additional cost, you can also add two single cots. These bunks and cots have a simple outdoor style mattress. With the optional cots, you can sleep up to 6 people in one tent cabin. There is a wood-burning stove inside the structure, and a picnic table with a grill area next to your tent cabin. There are bear proof storage containers throughout the tent village for you to store food supplies in. Public restrooms are nearby, and showers are available in the village at an additional cost.

Note: If there are only two of you, in 2011, the Semi-Private Cabin where you had to use a shared bathroom was $65 a night, and a Tent Cabin was $52, so this is only a $13 difference for two people.

The cabins and tent cabins are located in Colter Village, which has a marina, grocery store, gift and apparel shops, gas station, laundry matt, museum, and visitor center. Restaurants, hiking trails, boat outings, and horseback riding activities are close by.

  • Opinion of Price: about average
  • Related to: National/State Park, Road Trip, Budget Travel
  • Written January 7, 2011
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Colter Bay Village Cabins

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Jackson Lodge Cottages: Separate From the Lodge

Besides staying within Jackson Lodge, you have the choice of staying in one of the cottages that are considered part of the lodge accommodations. These are located only a short distance from the main lodge, and you will still have the use of the lodge swimming pool. There is no internet access available in the cottages, but there is an internet room in the Lodge and also wireless access in the lobby. There are four types of cottages to choose from. These cottages are not single cabins structures, but a cluster of buildings that have two or more accommodations in each.

The Classic Cottage Rooms are located next to the main lodge and are a group of single-story buildings surrounded by pine trees. These cottages will not give you a view of the mountain range. Each accommodation is a room with a private entrance, two queen beds, and a private bathroom. These sleep four people, or five with an optional rollaway bed.

The Classic Cottage with Patio choice only sleeps two in a single king bed, but a rollaway bed is available for a third person. These rooms have a private entrance, a private bathroom, and a patio with two outdoor wooden chairs. Like the classic Cottage Rooms, the setting is in a wooded area, with no mountain view.

The Mountain View Cottages have a private entrance, private bath, and a large picture window that faces the Teton Range, giving you a wonderful view of the mountains. Each of these includes a patio or balcony with wooden chairs, and a mini refrigerator. You have a choice of rooms with two double beds, or with one king sized bed. A single sized rollaway bed is available.

The most expensive of the Cottages is the Mountain View Suite. This accommodation has the best views of the Teton Range. This choice overlooks Willow Flats, where if you are lucky you may see wildlife, especially moose that often graze in the flats. The suites have a private entrance, private bath, one king sized bed, a small sitting area, a coffee maker, a mini refrigerator, and a patio or balcony with wooden chairs. An optional single sized rollaway bed is available.

  • Opinion of Price: more expensive than average
  • Written January 5, 2011
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Cottages at Jackson Lodge


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Jackson Lake Lodge: A Popular, Historic Lodge

Jackson Lake Lodge was completed in 1955, and is considered a prime example of the International Style of architecture built on U.S. government parklands in the mid-20th century.

The historic lodge has 37 rooms within the main lodge building, and 385 rooms in the nearby cottages, a restaurant, grill, conference room, and a wonderful lobby to relax in, or just enjoy the view outside the huge picture window.

The main lodge rooms are located on the third floor of the lodge, and face the forest. These are the least expensive within the lodge building, but if you are hoping for a view, you will be disappointed.

The mountain view rooms have windows with views of the Teton Range, Willow Flat, and Jackson Lake. These rooms also have a mini refrigerator, and a private bath. Both the Main Lodge rooms and the Mountain View Lodge rooms have two queen sized beds. No rollaway beds are available.

The most expensive, the Moran Suite is the grandest accommodation within the lodge, with a living room, and a kitchenette with a dining area. The Moran Suite has views of the Teton Range from the living room or bedroom. The bedroom has a king sized bed and private bathroom with a jetted tub. There is also a second bathroom in the suite. Rollaway beds are available.

All accommodations within the lodge sleep up to four people.

The lodge is open from mid May through early October. The hotel is the largest of the accommodations offered within the park, and is also very popular, often booked up early in the season, so be sure to make reservations as far ahead of time as you can.

For views of the backside of the lodge with its large windows, see my second photo. My third photo shows a view from the back deck of the lodge.

When you first approach the Jackson Lodge it does not look like anything special, but when you step inside the lobby, and are greeted by the huge, 60-foot picture window that frames the Grand Teton Mountain Range, you will understand why this building is a National Historic Landmark site. If you are staying here, you will find yourself relaxing in the wonderful lobby, or stepping outside onto its back deck where you can enjoy the magnificent view of the mountains as you look across the willow Flats toward the lake. You may even be lucky enough to observe wildlife out on the flats.

There is an outdoor heated pool available for guests staying at the lodge, complete with a pool grill, where you may enjoy sandwiches, salads, or burgers, while lounging next to the pool. At night a barbeque buffet is offered poolside. You will also find gift and clothing shops, a gas station, and a medical clinic at the lodge.

In the evening step into the Blue Lounge and enjoy an appetizer and/or cocktails while you listen to live music.

  • Opinion of Price: more expensive than average
  • Related to: National/State Park, Road Trip
  • Written January 4, 2011
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Jackson Lake Lodge Entrance

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Colter Bay RV Park: A Full Hookup Campground

The RV Park at Colter Bay, is the most expensive campground in the park, as well as the only full hookup campground in Grand Teton. There are 112 sites, most with shade, and each with a picnic table. There are no fire rings, as no open fires are allowed in the RV Park. You may, however, use your own gas and charcoal grills. You can reserve sites within the RV Park, and I would highly recommended that you do this as far in advance as possible.

It is an easy walk or bike ride to the general store, which has the best grocery store I have ever seen in a national park. There is also a nearby laundry mat, and gift store. Hiking trails are in the area, and it is about a 5 minute walk to Jackson Lake. Horse back riding, guided fishing trips, and scenic lake cruises are also located near-by.

  • Opinion of Price: most expensive
  • Related to: National/State Park, Camping
  • Written December 13, 2010
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Colter Bay RV Park

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Jenny Lake Lodge: For Those of You Where Cost is Not an Issue

Nestled in the forest, Jenny Lake Lodge has been in business since 1920, and offers you a quiet accommodation with a rustic atmosphere. This lodge is advertised as the only 4-diamond eco-resort in the park. The 31 available cabins are rustic, yet elegant, and very comfortable with log walls, wood floors, and hand-made quilts. There are three types of cabins to choose from. Most are single-room cabins in freestanding log cabins, each with a private bathroom. Duplex cabins are two accommodations that share one common wall and a porch, each with a private bathroom. There are no connecting doors between the two cabins in the duplex. Suites offer the most luxury, each in an individual cabin with a bedroom, sitting parlor, and a wood burning stove. Options for the suites are choosing one with a king sized bed, or two queen. The Water Lilly suit also has a Jacuzzi tub.

The dining room is located in a western style log lodge, with a large stone fireplace. Here you will be served a gourmet breakfast and a five-course dinner, both which are included with your cabin. Lunch is available, although not included with your cabin, so is an additional cost.

  • Opinion of Price: most expensive
  • Related to: Luxury Travel, National/State Park
  • Written December 13, 2010
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Jenny Lake Lodge


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  • KimberlyAnn profile photo KimberlyAnn
  • Reviews: 1083

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Colter Bay Village Campground: Camping in Grand Teton

Colter Bay Village Campground has 350 sites, and is open from late May to late September of October. (check their seasonal dates, which may change from year to year.) This campground offers sites for tents and RVs, although there are no hook-ups available. There is a dump station, and restrooms in the campground. The restrooms do not have showers, but there are pay showers in the nearby Colter Bay Village launderette. There are also 11 group sites. This is the largest campground in the park, and at the time of this writing, it is a first come, first serve campground, so you can not make reservations, except for the group sites. This campground usually does not fill up until late in the day. We usually do not like sites that are just wide spots along the side of the road, but behind each site is a sizable wooded area, with a picnic table and fire ring, that greatly enhanced the site. See my second photo for a view of this open wooded area behind our campsite.

While staying in the campground you may enjoy attending one of the evening Ranger Talks given by Park Naturalists in the Colter Bay Village Amphitheater.

In the nearby Colter Bay Village you will find the best national park grocery store I have ever seen, a gift shop, gas station, and the nearby Colter Bay marina. There is an area in the village to book various park activities such as boat cruises, lake fishing, horseback rides, and float trips. A small laundry mat with pay showers is also in the village area.

  • Opinion of Price: less expensive than average
  • Related to: Camping, National/State Park, Road Trip
  • Written December 8, 2010
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The RV Sites Are Roadside

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Jackson Lake Lodge - Cottage: Very expensive and also very comfortable!

When I called for reservations about one month before our planned trip, the only accommodations still available in either Yellowstone or the adjoining Grand Teton National Park during the July/August peak period was at Jackson Lake Lodge, located beside Jackson Lake in Grand Teton NP. Knowing that we had to have accommodations somewhere inside the parks in order to keep our driving down to a minimum, I booked two nights in one of their 348 rooms located in cottages that are adjacent to the main lodge building (which has another 37 rooms of its own). Even though the whole complex was built in the 1950s, the cottages are really done up in first-class style, as they should be for US$250/night including taxes!

As shown here with our car parked in front, our cottage #340 was one of two adjoining cottages (this seems to be the standard practice at Jackson Lake Lodge) and was located only a short walk from the Lodge, where the restaurants, gift shop, wine/beer section and best viewpoints of the Teton Range mountains can be found. The other photos show our two very comfortable beds, a large dresser area and the excellent bathroom (the main room also had a second sink in the short hallway outside the bathroom). There was no internet access in the cottage, but that didn’t seem to be a problem as there is an internet room available in the Lodge and also wireless access in their lobby area. Tall trees cover the property and all was very quiet, providing an excellent stay at Jackson Lake Lodge. We really enjoyed our time in the main lodge, where we had our breakfasts and two evening meals (one a snack on their outside rear viewing deck and the other in their first-class dining room). I’d say it was money well-spent!

  • Opinion of Price: more expensive than average
  • Related to: Road Trip, National/State Park
  • Written October 31, 2010
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Front view of our cottage (adjoining one on right)

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  • richiecdisc profile photo richiecdisc
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Jackson Lake Lodge: a hotel with a view

Jackson Lake Lodge may not look like the classic rustic old inn of the most pedigreed National Parks from the outside but that's because it was not built until 1955 and only recently made it onto the list of National Historic Landmarks. The exterior does reflect its natural setting if in a more austere and modern way. Once inside however, it has tons of rustic charm though perhaps looking a bit more upscale than the older lodges. It was nonetheless very cozy and comfortable to hang out in though we did not have much bad weather to retreat there from. Not that we were complaining and we still did go a few times to check our e-mail as there appeared to be a free wireless connection. With massive picture windows, it is very bright and the views of the Tetons are nice enough to never leave.

National Park hotels in the US are open for all visitors to the park whether staying in the hotel in question or not. As national historic sites, they part of our heritage and in no way do staff make you feel like you are intruding if you hang out in the lobby, even for hours. This would be a great place to do just that on a rainy day.

If you want to stay in the great lodge, expect to pay between $225-250 for a room without a view. Those with fetch up to $300 and suites can be as high as $775. Cottages not attached to the main building are similarly priced.

  • Opinion of Price: most expensive
  • Related to: Romantic Travel and Honeymoons, Luxury Travel, National/State Park
  • Written December 14, 2009
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D poses with the grizzly

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Phelps Lake Campground: our last night in the backcountry was special

Our fifth and final night in the backcountry of Grand Teton National Park was spent at Phelps Lake. It would have been easy enough to hike right out from the Alaska Basin but this sounded like a great place to camp and it was free so what the hell.

Though initially, we were not happy when the trail took us what seemed miles off the main hike to the lakeside campground, our grumblings ended once we got our hilltop spot overlooking the lake. This lower elevation camp was much warmer and we enjoyed a leisurely afternoon walking to the lake's sandy shore before returning to cook our dinner on a boulder on the lake just downhill from our tent.

In the morning, there was a magnificent mirror reflection of the peaks on the now flat Phelps Lake. After shooting as many photos as my chilled fingers could muster, we packed up our gear and walked back to the sandy shore we had lingered on the previous afternoon. It was the prefect place for our last breakfast in the Tetons' backcountry.

This campground has a few spots that share a communal food storage locker so if you are just camping here, there is no need to carry a bear-proof food canister.

You must have a backcountry permit to camp in Grand Tetons National Park's vast wilderness as spaces are limited and restricted. Pick one up at a backcountry ranger station in the park. They are free!

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Related to: National/State Park, Backpacking, Camping
  • Written December 14, 2009
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enjoying our last day in the backcountry at Phelps

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Alaska Basin: and we headed out into the wilderness

Our fourth night in Grand Tetons' backcountry was not really in the National Park but in the Alaska Basin of the Jedidiah Smith Wildernesses. Of course, without a sign telling you that you are leaving the park you would never know. US National Parks are often surrounded by National Forest and such, making the wildernesses even bigger, and much better for wildlife.

This was an area I had not heard of but while backpacking in Glacier, one guy told us not to miss it. He also said the Tetons had to be the best backcountry camping in the US and we were inclined to agree after this. He was also the one that said getting permits was free, would be easy to get in September, and that the weather is generally good early in the month. Now, that was inside information and glad we listened.

This truly was a paradise and no one in sight on top of it. The sunset was gorgeous with all the surrounding peaks taking on a great red glow. There were a few mirror lakes for good effect and great spots to cook and eat our meals. We did quite a bit of exploring as the walk over the pass was not nearly as tough as we expected. Maybe we were just getting in better shape after five days of backpacking!

You must have a backcountry permit to camp in Grand Tetons National Park's vast wilderness as spaces are limited and restricted. Pick one up at a backcountry ranger station in the park. They are free!

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Related to: Camping, Backpacking, National/State Park
  • Written December 14, 2009
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D enjoying the view with morning teas

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South Fork of Cascade Canyon Zone: finally, unchartered territory for me

Our third night in the backcountry of Grand Teton National Park was in the South Fork of the Cascade Canyon Zone. This is a much steeper side of the Canyon and views of the Tetons are a bit obscured by this but make no mistake about it, the camping here is just as sublime. In fact, it was a bit of an oasis, with lots of green still lingering and one very nice manageable spring running through it. It was still ringed by the tops of peaks and had some nice short side trips that could be done from it.

We found a great spot to cook and eat which gave us great views and easy access, far from our little well-camouflaged tent. We did a walk up to the Avalanche Divide which gave us amazing views down at an incredible alpine lake. There was also a trail to Schoolhouse Glacier which we had no time or energy for and of course, you could climb up to Hurricane Pass. This would have been great for photos but since we had to do it the next morning, it wasn't really an option. I think if I were to backpack here again, I would come up to this spot and just stay for a few days, doing all the day hikes at the optimal time for light.

You must have a backcountry permit to camp in Grand Tetons National Park's vast wilderness as spaces are limited and restricted. Pick one up at a backcountry ranger station in the park. They are free!

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Related to: National/State Park, Backpacking, Camping
  • Written December 14, 2009
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our little oasis for the night


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North Fork of Cascade Canyon Zone: talk about seeing the Tetons up close

Our second night in the Grand Teton's vast backcountry was spent in the North Fork of the Cascade Canyon Zone. We didn't think we could top the previous spot but this one sure did just that. Set in a perfect glacial valley, you can really imagine a river of ice pushing its way to form this U-shaped beauty. It was very colorful with small red vegetation and lots of small streams running around it. This made it easy to fetch the water for meals and to drink but man, you had to walk quite a distance to get to a spot to relieve yourself that was not close to water. The ground was particularly hard so digging a hole was not something to look forward to especially since I had to dig two. I couldn't blame D though, it was hard enough for me to do and she just did not have the power.

The view of the Grand Tetons was head on. They look much different than from the road from this angle and I think even more impressive. They are so close you can almost reach out and touch them. Meals were great while gazing at them in wonder. It's a short but steep climb up to Solitude Lake, where camping is forbidden.

You must have a backcountry permit to camp in Grand Tetons National Park's vast wilderness as spaces are limited and restricted. Pick one up at a backcountry ranger station in the park. They are free!

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Related to: Backpacking, National/State Park, Camping
  • Written December 14, 2009
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camping in a glacial valley supreme


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Upper Paintbrush Canyon Zone: first night in Tetons' backcountry was bliss

Camping in the Grand Tetons' backcountry is a joy. Our first night was in the Upper Paintbrush Canyon Zone. This was a gorgeous spot close to popular Holly Lake which was full that night. We did take a walk over there and it had very nice views down at Jackson & Leigh Lakes as well as being right on the small lake but it was not as private as the spot we had.

We also found a great little reflection pool to capture a nearby peak in as the sun went down very close to where we pitched our tent. A great group of boulders provided a perfect spot for dinner and breakfast. Once the sun went down, we were not only in our tent but deep in our warm sleeping bags. It gets mighty cold at 9000 feet in September in Wyoming!

Unlike some parks that make formal campgrounds even in the backcountry, Grand Tetons goes for a more wild approach, having campers set up in roughly outlined zones. You find a suitable spot in the zone and try to leave it exactly as you found it. There are no pit toilets, you have to dig a hole, no easy feat in this rocky terrain! You cook, eat, and store your food far from your tent but where you like.

You must have a backcountry permit to camp in Grand Tetons National Park's vast wilderness as spaces are limited and restricted. Pick one up at a backcountry ranger station in the park. They are free!

  • Opinion of Price: N/A
  • Related to: Camping, National/State Park, Backpacking
  • Written December 14, 2009
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pick a spot in paradise

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Signal Mountain: it doesn't HAVE to be Jenny Lake

Signal Mountain Campground was a real revelation. I had camped at the highly coveted Jenny Lake Campground in 1994 and had to get up at dawn to secure a spot. Our 2008 visit was a planned long sojourn to the park so I knew I would get my chance at a Jenny reunion at some point. Signal Mountain made a lot of sense. It was central, close to a few great morning spots for photos and there was a ranger station nearby that we could secure backcountry permits for what would make up the meat of our visit.

We arrived to find many of the 81 spots still available. Ah, so nice to travel in September when all the kiddies are back in school! In season, this first-come, first-served campground generally fills by noon. With so many choices we drove around a few loops and found one that suited us perfectly. Many might have passed this one by as you had to walk uphill about 20 feet to reach its hilltop location. It did not give us any particular view as some others had, but it was very private and surrounded by trees. There was a bear storage locker so we put all our food and cooking gear in there to eliminate too much backtracking to the car. It wasn't too far to the restroom but far enough to not hear everyone in camp going to brush their teeth. It was a great spot for meals and we enjoyed quite a few nice ones. Nights were cool and crisp. Days sunny and warm. We had one noisy group next to us despite it being quite far away but thankfully, they left after our first night.

This lakeside campground has 81 sites so a mid-size affair compared to the mega ones like Colter Bay which have 350. Some siites do in fact have a view of the lake but it's an elevated view and through some trees. These spots did not have the tree cover we like. In general, spots are very well-spaced and you have good privacy. Restrooms are modern with flush toilets and trash disposal is at a central spot which might seem like a hassle but better for bear management. The Signal Mountain Lodge is at the campground's entrance and they have a small store selling essentials and even an okay selection of beer.

The price was $18 per night, good value for such a nice central location.

  • Opinion of Price: least expensive
  • Related to: Road Trip, National/State Park, Camping
  • Written December 14, 2009
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bratwurst & mash at Signal Mountain Campground


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