Best Western Pedro Figari

4 out of 5 stars4 Stars

Rambla Republica De Mexico 6535, Montevideo, 11500, Uruguay
BEST WESTERN Pedro Figari
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More about Best Western Pedro Figari

Must look activity 4

by andal13

Pedro Figari (1861-1938)

He was born in Montevideo; lawyer, politician, legislator, journalist, he began to paint when he was 60 years old. His pictures, simple and colourful, shows the life and customs of the common people, especially the Afro-uruguayan people.

Nació en Montevideo; abogado, político, legislador, periodista, comenzó a pintar cuando tenía 60 años de edad. Sus cuadros, simples y coloridos, muestran la vida y las costumbres de la gente común, especialmente de los afrouruguayos.

The picture shows "Toque de oración" (1925)

El Museo Nacional de Artes Visuales

by Hexepatty

El Museo Nacional de Artes Visuales de Montevideo, Uruguay, cuenta con un patrimonio conformado por 4.500 obras entre las cuales se destacan las de autores nacionales. Entre las colecciones mas relevantes se encuentran las de: Juan Manuel Blanes, Carlos Federico Saez, Pedro Figari, Rafael Barradas y Joaquin Torres Garcia. Complementan la actividad del museo, exposiciones temporarias de artistas extranjeros y nacionales...

Having only been in Montivideo...

by pjallittle

Having only been in Montivideo for a day, there is not a great deal to say. We hired a young man to take us here and there and all the pictures are places that we actually saw. The drive and visit to Ponte de Este was most enjoyable and scenic. Plus, the driver was a real comedian who felt compelled to keep us entertained.

The picture is from their Independence Square. Plaza Indepencia. These are very common throughout all of South America. They are BIG on Horses.



Introduction

Uruguay may be pint-sized but it's certainly big-hearted when it comes to attractions. It contains one of South America's most interesting capitals, charming colonial towns and a cluster of internation-ally renowned beach resorts.




República Oriental del Uruguay

Area: 187,000 sq km (72,930 sq mi)

Population: 3,334,074

Capital city: Montevideo (pop 1,400,000)

People: 88% European descent, 8% Mestizo, 4% Black

Language: Spanish

Religion: 66% Roman Catholic, 2% Protestant, 2% Jewish

Government: Republic


President: Jorge Batlle Ibañez

GDP: US$28.4 billion

GDP per head: US$8,600

Annual growth: 3%

Inflation: 8%

Major industries: Wool, hides, beef, fishing, textiles, footwear, tires, cement, tourism

Major trading partners: Brazil, Argentina, USA, Germany, Italy


Facts for the Traveler

Visas: Most foreigners require a visa, except nationals from neighboring countries, Western Europe, Israel, Japan, South Africa and the USA. All visitors need a tourist card, which is valid for 90 days and extendable for a similar period.

Health risks: Hepatitis

Time: GMT/UTC minus 3 hours

Electricity: 220V, 50 Hz

Weights & measures: Metric

When to Go

Uruguay's main attraction is its beaches, so most visitors come in summer. Along the littoral, summer temperatures are smotheringly hot, but the hilly interior is cooler, especially at night.

Events

The country's show-stopper is the annual Carnaval, which takes place on the Monday and Tuesday immediately preceding Ash Wednesday. Montevideo's staid reputation takes a battering during this time as a brace of drummers and costumed revelers advance along its streets. Holy Week (Easter) or La Semana Criolla offers traditional activities like asados (barbecues), horse-breaking, cowboy stunt riding and folk music.

Money & Costs
Currency:
Peso Uruguayo (U$)

Relative Costs:

Budget room: US$5-15

Moderate hotel: US$15-20Top-end hotel: US$20+

Budget meal: US$2-8

Moderate meal: US$8-15

Top-end meal: US$15+

Annual inflation in Uruguay hovers around 15%, but steady devaluations keep prices from rising rapidly in dollar terms.Costs are slightly lower than in Argentina, especially with respect to accommodation and transportation. Budget travelers can get by on US$15 a day; those looking for a bit more comfort and nutrition should expect to spend closer to US$30 a day.

Cambios in Montevideo, Colonia and Atlantic beach resorts change US dollars cash and travelers' checks (the latter at slightly lower rates or modest commissions). Banks are the rule in the interior. Better hotels, restaurants and shops accept credit cards, but Uruguayan ATMs reject North American or European credit cards. There is no black market.

In restaurants, it's customary to tip about 10% of the bill. Taxi drivers do not require tips, although you may round off the fare for convenience.

Attractions
Montevideo

The capital and only large city sprawls along the banks of the Río de la Plata, almost directly opposite Buenos Aires. It's a picturesque place of colonial Spanish, Italian and Art Deco styles. Most attention is focused on the Ciudad Vieja, the old city built on a peninsula close to the port and harbor, and the commercial center, located around Plaza Independencia to the east.

To get your bearings in the city center, take a walk from Plaza Independencia, the grandest of Montevideo's squares, through the Ciudad Vieja to the port. On the plaza is the black-marbled Mauseleo de Artigas, topped by an enormous statue of the national hero, and the 26-story Palacio Salvo, the tallest building in South America when built in 1927 and still the tallest in the city today. The Plaza Constitución, neoclassical Cabildo and the Iglesia Matriz, the oldest public building (1799) in the city, are further west.

Other important sights in the area include the Museo Histórico Nacional, which consists of four different homes filled with historical effects, and the Museo del Gaucho y de la Moneda, which houses an impressive display of artefacts from Uruguay's gaucho (cowboy) past. Also, don't miss the Mercado del Puerto, once the finest port in South America, and now a colorful, lively center filled with markets, restaurants, artists and street musicians. The Feria de Tristán Narvaja is an outdoor market peddling groceries, antiques and souvenirs. A handful of sandy beaches stretch along the metropolitan waterfront and are popular excursions for the city's residents on summer weekends.

Inexpensive accommodation, eateries, nightclubs and theaters are found in the Ciudad Vieja, while the best shopping is along Avenida 18 de Julio, which runs eastwards from the old city.

The Uruguayan Littoral West of Montevideo, and covering the portion of Uruguay which fronts the Río de la Plata and the Río Uruguay, is the country's most important agricultural area. Its outstanding attraction is the lively colonial city of Colonia (del Sacramento), an under-appreciated gem of narrow cobbled streets flanked by whitewashed buildings. The boating, fishing and swimming are good along the beaches of Mercedes, and there are many excellent museums in Paysandú, Uruguay's second largest city.

The Uruguayan Riviera

The area east of Montevideo is one of the most Westernized places in Uruguay with innumerable beach resorts, plenty of water activities and lots of well-groomed, narcissistic tourists sporting hibiscus shirts. Immediately east of the capital is the major resort of Atlántida, and Piriápolis is a mere flick of the towel away. From here, you can venture into the surrounding countryside and climb the 493m (1617ft) Cerro Pan de Azúcar or visit Minas, a lovely town set in wooded hills.

The largest and best known of the resorts is Punta del Este, one of South America's most glamourous and exclusive destinations. The place is awash with yacht and fishing clubs, golf courses, casinos and beautiful holiday homes. If that's not enough, there are excellent bathing beaches, perfect for swimming and sunbathing. Just offshore are Isla Gorriti, which has more superb beaches and the ruins of an 18th-century fortress, and Isla de Lobos, a nature reserve that is home to a large sea-lion colony.

Off the Beaten Track
Colonia Suiza

About 120km (74mi) west of Montevideo dozes the quiet destination of Colonia Suiza. Founded in 1862 by Swiss settlers, it became Uruguay's first interior agricultural colony, churning out wheat for the mills in Montevideo. It still retains a distinctive European ambience today and produces the bulk of the country's dairy products.

Tacuarembó

Tacuarembó, in the department of the same name, is an agreeable town of sycamore-lined streets and shady plazas. Since its founding in 1832, local authorities have kept sculptors busy fashioning busts, statues and monuments commemorating military figures as well as writers, clergy members and educators. In late March, a three-day gaucho festival features exhibitions, riding skills, music and other activities.

Aguas Dulces

If you're hankering for a really peaceful seaside holiday, visit Aguas Dulces in the department of Rocha. It's a quaint, unprepossessing fishing village with modest facilities, great seafood and a local speciality - the messy but flavorful fruit of the butía palm.

Activities

Yachting, boating, fishing and watersports are excellent at Carmelo and Mercedes. There are also sandy beaches and pellucid waters at the resort of Punta del Este, and thermal baths at Termas de Guaviyú. Short walks abound around Piriápolis, while dune walking is a popular pastime in the remote Cabo Polonia.

History

Uruguay's aboriginal inhabitants were the Charrúa Indians, a hunter-gatherer people who cared little for outsiders. They killed the explorer Juan Diaz de Solís and most of his party when the Spaniards encountered them in 1516. By the 17th century, the Charrúas had prospered and, abandoning hostilities, began trading with the Spanish.

In 1680, the Portuguese founded Colonia on the estuary of the Río de la Plata as a rival to Spanish-held Buenos Aires on the opposite shore. Spain responded by building its own citadel at Montevideo. Uruguayan hero José Artigas fought against the Spanish but was unable to prevent a Brazilian takeover of the Banda (the original name of the eastern shore of the Río de la Plata). Exiled to Paraguay, he inspired the '33 Orientales' who, with Argentine support, liberated the area in 1828 and established Uruguay as an independent buffer state between Argentina and Brazil.

Uruguay's fragile independence was repeatedly threatened during the 19th century - militarily by Argentina and Brazil, and economically by Britain. Federalist forces in collusion with Argentina besieged Montevideo from 1838-51 and helped create two warring political parties, the Blancos and the Colorados. Around the same time, the British introduced new wool, meat and rail industries. They also replaced the rangy criollo stock with their own cattle, thus commercializing one of the country's few abundant resources. For the remainder of the century, the contest between the Blancos and Colorados continued, immersing the country in civil war, dictatorship and political intrigue.

In the early 20th century, the visionary President José Batlle y Ordóñez achieved far-reaching reforms and made Uruguay the only 'welfare state' in Latin America. During his two terms as president - 1903-07 and 1911-15 - he implemented a range of free social services, abolished capital punishment and sought to curb the country's legacy of strong-arm rule. Uruguay soon flourished on the back of the rural livestock sector but its failure to grow, coupled with the country's lack of natural resources, meant the welfare state became increasingly fictitious over time.


The country's former prosperity had ebbed away by the 1960s as state-supported enterprises became riddled with corruption. The country slid into dictatorship and was thrown into turmoil by the Tupamaros, an urban guerrilla movement which appeared publicly in 1967. In 1971, the military was invited to participate in government, Congress was dissolved, and the Tupamaros were effectively wiped out.

The much-hated military continued to hold sway in national politics until 1984 when Julio María Sanguinetti won the presidential election. His government implied a return to democratic traditions and fostered a process of national reconciliation beginning with a widespread political amnesty, but there were no new radical economic policies. In 1990, free-market reformer Luis Alberto Lacalle took office. However, in 1994, considerable opposition to Lacalle's plans for wage restraint, spending cuts and major state sell-offs paved the way for Sanguinetti to once again take control.

Culture

Uruguay may be a small country but it has impressive artistic and literary traditions. International acclaim has greeted artists such as Pedro Figari, a painter of bucolic scenes, and José Enrique Rodó, arguably the nation's greatest writer. Theater is popular and playwrights such as Mauricio Rosencof - a former Tupamaros founder tortured by the military government in the 1970s - are prominent in cultural life. Most of the country's musical and dance traditions (folk songs, polkas, waltzes, tangos, etc) came from Europe but developed local hybrids. Football is a national obsession.

Uruguayans who profess a religion are almost exclusively Roman Catholic, but the Church and state are officially separate. Other religions have made small inroads: There is a small Jewish community in Montevideo, several evangelical Protestant groups and traces of Sun Myung Moon's Unification Church.

Uruguayans are voracious meat eaters and the parrillada (beef platter) is a national standard. Another standard is chivito, a tasty and substantial steak sandwich with all the trimmings. Typical snacks include olímpicos (club sandwiches) and húngaros (spicy sausage wrapped in a hot dog roll). Tea or mate is quaffed in enormous quantities. Clericó, a mixture of white wine and fruit juice, and medio y medio, part sparkling wine and part white wine, are popular, and the beer is pretty good.

Environment

Uruguay - the smallest Hispanic country in South America -


is boxed into the eastern coast of South America by Brazil to the north and Argentina to the west. To the south is the wide estuary of the Río de la Plata, while the Atlantic Ocean washes its eastern shore. For the most part, the country's undulating topography is an extension of that in southern Brazil, and includes two lowly ranges - the Cuchilla de Haedo and the Cuchilla Grande. The terrain levels out west of Montevideo, while east of the capital are impressive beaches, dunes and headlands. Five rivers flow westward across the country and drain into the Río Uruguay.

The country's flora consists mostly of grasslands, with little forest except on the banks of its rivers and streams. In the southeast, along the Brazilian border, are lingering traces of palm savanna. Wild animals are scarce, although rhea (a bird-like ostrich) can still be seen in areas near major tributaries.

The climate is temperate, even in winter, and frosts are almost unknown. Winter (June to September) temperatures range from 10 to 16°C (50 to 61°F), while summer (December to March) temperatures are between 21 to 28°C (70 to 82°F). Rainfall, evenly distributed throughout the year, averages about 1m (3ft) over the entire country.

Getting There & Away

Montevideo is the main gateway for flights to and from the country. The international departure tax is US$2.50 to Argentina, US$6 to other South American countries and US$12 to elsewhere. For domestic flights the departure tax is around US$1. Road and bus services across the borders with Brazil and Argentina are good. Unfortunately, there are no rail services linking these countries. A ferry and hydrofoil service runs between Colonia and Buenos Aires. Ferry passengers embarking at Montevideo pay a US$5 port terminal and departure tax, while those at Colonia pay US$3.

Getting Around

Since the military airline TAMU has suspended services, there are no domestic flights within Uruguay except for the domestic leg of international flights from Punta del Este via Montevideo to Brazil. Buses are reasonably priced and there are frequent services to all sizeable destinations. Traveling by car poses few problems once outside hazardous Montevideo, although the country's winding roads and hilly terrain require some care. Local transport is predominantly by bus and metered taxi.



PLEASE [CLICK]AND CONTINUE TO TRAVELOGUE

Uruguay - País Natural

by mcaffa

"Uruguay"

Uruguay may be a small country but it has impressive artistic and literary traditions. International acclaim has greeted artists such as Pedro Figari, a painter of bucolic scenes, and José Enrique Rodó, arguably the nation's greatest writer. Theater is popular and playwrights such as Mauricio Rosencof - a former Tupamaros founder tortured by the military government in the 1970s - are prominent in cultural life. Most of the country's musical and dance traditions (folk songs, polkas, waltzes, tangos, etc) came from Europe but developed local hybrids. Football is a national obsession.

Uruguayans who profess a religion are almost exclusively Roman Catholic, but the Church and state are officially separate. Other religions have made small inroads: There is a small Jewish community in Montevideo, several evangelical Protestant groups and traces of Sun Myung Moon's Unification Church.

Uruguayans are voracious meat eaters and the parrillada (beef platter) is a national standard. Another standard is chivito, a tasty and substantial steak sandwich with all the trimmings. Typical snacks include olímpicos (club sandwiches) and h?ngaros (spicy sausage wrapped in a hot dog roll). Tea or mate is quaffed in enormous quantities. Clerico, a mixture of white wine and fruit juice, and medio y medio, part sparkling wine and part white wine, are popular, and the beer is pretty good.

"Mi Montevideo"

Hi, I'm Margaux. I was born and raised in Wisconsin, USA and am half Uruguayan. I have spent much time in Uruguay over the last several years and had the pleasure of living there in 2003-04. I continue to spend my summers there every year.

Uruguay is an absolutely beautiful country rich with culture and a strong warmth among the people.

BE SURE TO VISIT MY URUGUAYOS DEL MUNDO PAGE!!http://groups.yahoo.com/group/uruguayosoftheworld/

Photos

Empanadas CarolinaEmpanadas Carolina

Casa RiveraCasa Rivera

Palacio SalvoPalacio Salvo

Holocaust MonumentHolocaust Monument

Forum Posts

Estansia daytrip / overnight ex Montevideo or Cordoba?

by nikoskaps

Hi there!
I'll be in Uruguay next month and I wonder if it is possible to see or stay in an estancia, starting from Montevideo or Cordoba (not really luxurious, expensive etc).
Could be possible on a day trip or stay the night.
But I' ll travel by public transport so cannot just drive there -much better if being near easy access with bus, or they pick up, or take a guided tour ex these 2 cities, or...?
Any idea for where to look, feasibility, cost, would be really great!
many thanks
Nikos

correction

by nikoskaps

correction: I meant Colonia D.S. instead of Cordoba- sorry!

Re: Estansia daytrip / overnight ex Montevideo or Cordoba?

by rafscab

Hi,

Check http://www.guiacolonia.com.uy/estancias.htm

There's a list of Estancias near Colonia del Sacramento.

This is another usefull site: http://www.ceciliaregulesviajes.com/Estancias.htm

Good luck and enjoy,

Rafa

Re: Estansia daytrip / overnight ex Montevideo or Cordoba?

by nikoskaps

thanks Rafa, I'll check both!
generally seems that Colonia has more options for estancia visit, compared to Montevideo?
I'll try to spot one with easier access by public transport - I'll not have a car.
have a great time!
N.

Re: Estansia daytrip / overnight ex Montevideo or Cordoba?

by rafscab

Most estancias (ranchs) are not easily accesible by public transport because it situated in rural areas. I'm sure any of these places might provide some kind of transportation.
Montevideo, as it is the capital city has not many ranchs nearby.
Regards,
Rafa

Travel Tips for Montevideo

The lighthouse

by andal13

Punta Carretas lighthouse was inaugurated in 1876; it is 19 m high, and it is situated 34º56'07'' South - 56º09'36'' West. The original machinery is still working (it is a beautiful bronze structure), althought the ancient fuse was substituted for a 1.000 W light bulb. It sparkles white and red light, each 10 seconds; the light can be seen 15 nautical miles away.

El faro de Punta Carretas fue inaugurado en 1876; tiene 19 m de altura, y está situado a 34º56'07'' Latitud sur - 56º09'36'' Longitud oeste. La maquinaria original aún funciona (es una bella estructura de bronce), aunque la antigua mecha fue sustituida por una lámpara de 1.000 W. Lanza destellos blancos y rojos cada 10 segundos; la luz se ve desde una distancia de 15 millas náuticas.

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 Best Western Pedro Figari

We've found that other people looking for this hotel also know it by these names:

Best Western Montevideo
Montevideo Best Western
Best Western Pedro Figari Hotel Montevideo

Address: Rambla Republica De Mexico 6535, Montevideo, 11500, Uruguay