Tassili n'Ajjer National Park Tourist Traps

  • Tassili, Tin Aboteka, the large archer
    Tassili, Tin Aboteka, the large archer
    by JLBG
  • Tourist Traps
    by JLBG
  • Tourist Traps
    by JLBG

Most Recent Tourist Traps in Tassili n'Ajjer National Park

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    Association des Amis de l'Art Rupestre Saharien

    by JLBG Updated May 4, 2006

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    This is not a tourist trap but guidelines to avoid traps.

    Unique Suggestions: The “Association des Amis de l'Art Rupestre Saharien“ (AARS) is a non profit association that has the following aim (pasted from its statutes)

    To promote studies of Saharan rock art, to make known relevant documents, and everything linked directly and indirectly to this aim. The Association intends in particular to bring together periodically people, both amateurs and/or research professionals, interested on several accounts by the rock art of the Sahara ; to communicate any useful information, by an exchange of information and opinion within the Association or through its publications ; to publish a Letter of the Association informing members of all the events, scientific or other, related to this aim.

    More on the AARS at :
    http://aars.fr/
    Other interesting links :
    www.saharafragile.org
    www.acacus.it/eng/tutela_salva_00a.htmÒ

    The AARS takes part in the effort for the conservation of the precious vestiges of rock art in the Sahara. On its website, it has adapted a chart first issued by the American Rock Art Research Association (ARARA), a non profit organization dedicated to the support of rock art research, conservation, and education.

    More on the ARARA on:
    http://www.nps.gov/care/arpa.htm
    www.arara.org

    There is not enough space on this tip to give the Rock Art Site Etiquette. It will be on the next tip

    Related to:
    • Desert
    • Archeology

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    Shooting photos during a camel trek

    by JLBG Updated May 4, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

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    To take good photos during a camel trek is a real challenge.

    The easiest is at the bivouac or at the noon meal + siesta period but this is accounts only for a small part of each day.

    Do not forget that when the group is walking, it will NEVER wait after the photographer (BTW, neither will it wait after anyone that wants to release. Better not to be costive!. That means that the photographer must shoot fast, which is not always easy especially when shooting macrophotos (plants). Always keep an eye on the group walking away!

    Moreover, when the photographer wants to have a sight of the incoming caravan in the landscape, he will have to rush faster than the group to go ahead or will leave the trail and take a short-cut, jumping from one rock to the next one (strong ankles needed!). In the same way, when he wants to select a point of view different from what is available from the trail, he will also have to rush out and back to some distance.

    Generally speaking, the photographer will have to walk/run faster, longer and on a more difficult ground than the others in the group.

    When riding the camel, it will not be easier (understatement!). First of all, you must be stable enough and feel at ease on camel’s back. If this is the case, you have to collect your camera out of the bag hanging at the rear of the saddle. Once you have the camera, as the camel is walking and bouncing, it is not easy to frame very accurately. You must use a fast shutter speed. Of course, changing the objective is and added challenge! Anyway, you will have little choice in the framing.

    In the end, for protection, it is safer to slip back the camera into its bag before going down from the camel (see “how to ride a camel”)

    Fun Alternatives: Besides shooting, you must take care of your camera and especially beware of the sand. A few grains of sand can ruin your camera.

    Never put it on the soil (obvious!)

    Always have several plastic bags. If there is some sand wind, put your camera in two following plastic bags. At night, it is always advisable to put it in a plastic bag.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • National/State Park
    • Desert

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Shooting photos during a camel trek

    by JLBG Updated May 4, 2006

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    To take good photos during a camel trek is a real challenge.

    The easiest it at the bivouac or at the noon meal + siesta period but this accounts only for a small part of each day.

    Do not forget that when the group is walking, it will NEVER wait after the photographer (BTW, neither will it wait after anyone that wants to release. Better not to be costive! That means that the photographer must shoot fast, which is not always easy especially when shooting macrophotos (plants). Always keep an eye on the group walking away!

    Moreover, when the photographer wants to have a sight of the incoming caravan in the landscape, he will have to rush faster than the group to go ahead or will leave the trail and take a short-cut, jumping from one rock to the next one (strong ankles needed!). In the same way, when he wants to select a point of view different from what is available from the trail, he will also have to rush out and back to some distance.

    Generally speaking, the photographer will have to walk/run faster, longer and on a more difficult ground than the others in the group.

    When riding the camel, it will not be easier (understatement!). First of all, you must be stable enough and feel at ease on camel’s back. If this is the case, you have to collect your camera out of the bag hanging at the rear of the saddle. Once you have the camera, as the camel is walking and bouncing, it is not easy to frame very accurately. You must use a fast shutter speed. Of course, changing the objective is an added challenge! Anyway, you will have little choice in the framing.

    In the end, for protection, it is safer to slip back the camera into its bag before going down from the camel (see “how to ride a camel”)

    Fun Alternatives: Besides shooting, you must take care of your camera and especially beware of the sand. A few grains of sand can ruin your camera.

    Never put it on the soil (obvious!)

    Always have several plastic bags. If there is some sand wind, put your camera in two following plastic bags. At night, it is always advisable to put it in a plastic bag.

    Related to:
    • Desert
    • National/State Park
    • Photography

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    Rock Art Site Etiquette

    by JLBG Written Apr 28, 2006

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Tassili, Tin Aboteka, the large archer

    This is not a tourist trap but guidelines to avoid traps.

    Fun Alternatives: 1 - Don’t touch the rock art. Natural oils and acids on your skin will harm the images. Remember that you are not the only visitor to the site. The oils and acids soon accumulate to cause staining and other damage. Touching the images also simply wears them away over time.

    2 - Don’t move or remove any artifacts or even (apparently) ordinary stones you may find at a site. Any objects associated with the site are pieces of the same puzzle that tells us that the site and surrounding landscape- including all the associated plants and animals - are an important part of the site.

    3 - Don’t add graffiti or otherwise deface the images or the site. Rock art is not “ancient graffiti”. Even if others have been thoughtless enough to add their names or a message to the images, please don’t condone their actions by adding your own.

    4 - Don’t walk or climb across rock art to get to get closer to other images, or simply to explore, or to take a shortcut to another place. Unauthorized trails are easily established and with repeated use they erode and can irreparably damage sites.

    5 - Don’t make rubbings or casts of petroglyphs. Rubbings and casts cause damage to images by abrading them, by leaving behind residues of the materials used, by damaging the patina, or by taking off small particles.

    6 - Don’t use chalk or other materials to outline images. This is vandalism, besides which it is unsightly and can cause permanent damage to the rock art.

    7 - Don't throw water on the paintings to enhance them. The result is often worse, and it makes the paintings gradually disappear.

    9 - Do take your trash home with you and help by also carrying out trash that others have carelessly dropped.

    10 - Do take only photographs, drawings and memories. Leave only footprints. Remember, do not highlight images by using chalk, water, or other materials. Remember, touching images in any way damages them. See, don't touch !

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Desert
    • Photography

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Tassili n'Ajjer National Park Tourist Traps

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