Getting Around Benin

  • TAXI-MOTO
    TAXI-MOTO
    by DAO
  • TAXI-MOTO
    TAXI-MOTO
    by DAO
  • TAXI-MOTO
    TAXI-MOTO
    by DAO

Most Viewed Transportation in Benin

  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Road along the beach

    by sachara Updated Apr 6, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    To visit the beaches west of Cotonou, you have to take the unpaved road along the beach. If you don't have your own transport, you have to take a car or motorcycle as taxi.
    For the short distance it's also a nice road to walk, if you can stay in the shade of the palmtrees, just for reaching the next restaurant or one of the small beachbars.

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Long distance bus from Cotonou to Accra

    by sachara Updated Apr 6, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Finding your bushtaxi or bus in Cotonou is not always easy. Like in many West-African cities every destination has its own motor park, auto gare, busstation or just only an embarkation point.
    The long distance bus to Accra in Ghana departs from one of the unpaved side roads a few blocks from the Avenue de la Republique. So best to find out in time, from where you have to leave for your destination.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Motorcycle-taxis

    by sachara Updated Apr 6, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In the centre of Cotonou you see a lot of motorcycles, like in many other West-African countries. Many of the motorcycles are taxis.
    To choose the right one, just look at the yellow shirts of the drivers.
    It's an easy and cheap way of transport and gives a lot of fun. Prices started from about 100 CFA. For longer distances and in the evening we took a car as taxi. The 5 KM price for a car to the campsite was 3000 CFA.

    Related to:
    • Motorcycle

    Was this review helpful?

  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Ganvie, pirogues

    by sachara Updated Apr 6, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In Ganvie and at the lake Nokoue the local people use the traditional wooden pirogues for transportation of persons, but also for all kinds of goods.
    If you visit Ganvie or the other villages, you can choose also to take a pirogue, but there are also roofed motorboats.

    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating

    Was this review helpful?

  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Lake Nokoue, sailing pirogue

    by sachara Updated Apr 6, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    At the launching point in Abomey and on our way to Ganvie I saw a lot of pirogues, which have to be moved by hand.
    But on the lagoon I saw also some pirogues with a sail, using the wind.
    It was a nice view to see these pirogues also as sailing boats at the Lake Nokoue.

    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating

    Was this review helpful?

  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Lake Nokoue, fuel station

    by sachara Updated Apr 6, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In Ganvie and at the Lake Nokoue everything is built on stilts on the water or floating.
    So I was not surprised to see a local petrol station, not far from the launching point of Abomey-Calavi, built on stilts, providing petrol in bottles and plastic containers.

    Related to:
    • Sailing and Boating

    Was this review helpful?

  • janiebaxter's Profile Photo

    Visas

    by janiebaxter Written Apr 20, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you are travelling from the UK the visa for Benin is very fast and easy to get. Mine arrived within 7 days and I got it through CIBT a visa agency in London.
    The cost of the visa is £45 if you are applying directly through the embassy and CIBT charge a processing fee of £55 plus postage. This is for single entry, and as we decided to go to Togo for a day trip I had to purchase an extra visa at the border. I got a 48 hour transit visa which cost me 10,000 CFA (about €15)

    The address for the Benin consulate in London is
    Millennium Business Centre
    Humber Trading Est, Humber Rd, London, NW2 6DW, UK
    Tel +44 20 88308612

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • janiebaxter's Profile Photo

    Chinese Motorbikes

    by janiebaxter Written Apr 13, 2008

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The main method of transport for people in Benin is the motorbike. As you drive through the main cities and towns it is not unusual to see over 20 motorbikes waiting at the traffic lights. They are driven by both men and women and nobody wears a crash helmet. It is common to see families of 3 or 4 people on one motorbike. The cost of a motorbike is now around $1000 dollars and they are made in China. Much cheaper than a car and easier to get through the traffic.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Eco-Tourism

    Was this review helpful?

  • ajayzener's Profile Photo

    Motocycles Everywhere

    by ajayzener Updated Jul 15, 2006

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Within the city of Cotonou you will never be left stranded. The roads of Benin are full of motorcycles (Zemidjan) wanting to give you a ride. The familiar looking yellow jacketed motorcycle riders will never leave you alone on the road, they will always stop by you hinting you a lift. Night or day it is really easy a mode of transport. Just carry a helmet with you..the ride is rough !!!

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • janiebaxter's Profile Photo

    ZimZim Taxi Motorbikes

    by janiebaxter Written Apr 19, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The taxi motorbike is very popular throughout Benin. The name ZimZim comes from the word Zemija which means “ take me as far as you can.” The ZimZim taxis started during the financial crisis of the post Marxist 1980’s when the government could not afford to maintain the roads. The only vehicles that could negotiate most roads were motorbikes so unemployed university students in Porto Nuovo started taking passengers on their motorbikes, which could take most people right to their front doors. The trend soon spread to other areas and the ZimZim is now the most popular type of taxi.
    In Cotonou and the surrounding towns the ZimZim drivers wear yellow shirts so they can be easily identified amongst all the motorbike riders.
    None of the ZimZim drivers have safety helmets! However, in busy cities like Cotonou they don't get the chance to drive too fast.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • janiebaxter's Profile Photo

    Good Standard of Roads

    by janiebaxter Written Apr 20, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    All the roads we travelled on in Benin were very good and well maintained.
    I had a 4 wheel drive vehicle and a driver and travelling between the main towns and cities was very easy and fast. Distances between the main cities and tourist attractions in the South are not great so you don't have to drive all day.
    Most of the drivers in Benin drive very safely compared to many countries I have been to. Traffic in Cotonou is very congested in parts at times of the day but in the other towns and cities not much of a problem

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • niamey00's Profile Photo

    Bush taxi to/from Lome

    by niamey00 Written Nov 30, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    For a very comfortable and quick ride to/from Cotonou, consider hiring out a bush taxi for the trip. You have to buy all the seats, but the cost is still reasonable, US$10-15. After many cramped bush taxi rides, it was nice to have enough room for your luggage and your feet, not to mention you butt! PLus, they will take you to exactly where you want to go in Lome or Cotonou. Name the hotel, and your left at the door!

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Backpacking
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • niamey00's Profile Photo

    Take the train

    by niamey00 Written Nov 30, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you are heading to Northern Benin or on to Niger, and you have the time, consider taking the train. It is surprisingly comfortable, it travels away from the roads to some slightly remoter villages, and is much less crowded than a bush taxi. The down side is that it is slower and only goes to Parakou, but Parakou is a pleasant enough place to make a stop before continuing on to Pendjari National Park or Niger.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Trains
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • janiebaxter's Profile Photo

    Petrol Prices

    by janiebaxter Written Apr 18, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Petrol costs 480 CFA per litre at the petrol stations. However, most people buy the petrol that is brought in privately from Nigeria. It is either transported by road via Porto Nuovo using specially adapted motorbikes or down the river by boat. All along the roadside in Benin you will see stalls selling petrol in smaller bottles for the motorbikes or larger ones for the cars. The cost at the roadside is 350 CFA.
    There are 650 CFA to 1 euro

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

  • ajayzener's Profile Photo

    Air Connections from Benin

    by ajayzener Updated Jul 15, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are a few connections from/to the Cotonou Airport.
    Airlines Operating

    Air Senegal - to and from Dakar (Senegal) , Abidjan (Cote d'ivoire)
    Air Mauritaine - to and from Dakar, Abidjan, Bamako (Mali)
    Air Ivoire - to and from Abidjan
    Air France - to and from Paris (daily)
    Air Gabon - to and from Libreville (Gabon)
    Air Burkina - to and from Ougadougou

    Air MAuritaine, Air Gabon, Air France are the better airlines that I have travelled in, the rest operate smaller aircrafts.

    For anyone coming from Europe, the best connection is Air France - Paris. From US and americas, the best connection is from Senegal.

    Related to:
    • Business Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Benin Hotels

See all 6 Hotels in Benin

Top Benin Hotels

Cotonou Hotels
103 Reviews - 288 Photos
Tanguieta Hotels
10 Reviews - 17 Photos
Ouidah-Plage Hotels
See nearby hotels
Ouidah Hotels
25 Reviews - 54 Photos
Natitingou Hotels
21 Reviews - 37 Photos
Kandi Hotels
1 Review - 3 Photos
Ganvie Hotels
15 Reviews - 47 Photos
Bedo Hotels
See nearby hotels
Abomey-Calavi Hotels
See nearby hotels
Abomey Hotels
16 Reviews - 41 Photos

Instant Answers: Benin

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

86 travelers online now

Comments

Benin Transportation

Reviews and photos of Benin transportation posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Benin sightseeing.
Map of Benin