Manéga Travel Guide

  • Local dance.
    Local dance.
    by F_Meignant
  • Twins' tombstone.
    Twins' tombstone.
    by F_Meignant
  • The throne of the dead King.
    The throne of the dead King.
    by F_Meignant

Manéga Local Customs

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    The throne of the dead King.

    by F_Meignant Written Mar 9, 2004

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    The throne of the dead Naba. When the King dies, his corpse is placed on this throne and all the inhabitants meet for a great feast that takes place in front of the corpse. A way to say him goodbye.

    Only at this occasion, the door on the left of the picture is open to take the corpse in and out.
    The pretenders to the throne enter the King’s house by the door on the right.
    Other people enter through a low door (off the picture, on the right).

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    Signs of the Mouse.

    by F_Meignant Written Mar 9, 2004

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    This one is a kind of obelisk covered with mosaic. The signs are called “les Signes de la Souris” (the Signs of the Mouse). They are a series of symbolic signs that were (and still are) used to predict the future.

    The man who knows them draws them in a certain order on the ground of a well closed hut.
    He then puts some food at the corners of the hut (usually, North, South, East and West).
    Then, a mouse is introduced in the hut and the door is closed. Later, the door is open and the man who knows the signs enter, checks on what signs the mouse walked, and gives his interpretation.

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    The Tinga-Naba.

    by F_Meignant Updated Mar 9, 2004

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    This statue made of iron tubes is 15 metres high. It represents the “Chef des Terres” (Head of the Lands), the Tinga-Naba. Actually the most powerful man of the village even though he is under the Chief in the hierarchy.
    The Tinga-Naba distributes the pieces of land between the families and is the judge for all problems concerning the land.
    His signs are a forked stick and a hoe. He usually is the oldest man of the village and is supposed to be closer to dead people than to living ones.

    “Si la termitière vit, c’est qu’elle ajoute de la terre à la Terre” (local saying) : « If the termite mound lives, it’s because it brings earth to Earth ».

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