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Most Viewed Favorites in Cameroon

  • Wafro's Profile Photo

    Flat tyres

    by Wafro Updated Nov 19, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: When you’re travelling around Cameroon by public transport you certainly once come across a flat tyre. The condition of most of the roads is dramatically bad and the condition of many vehicles is even worse. So flat tyres or cars that won’t start are part of the all day life.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • Safari

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  • How we are living in Cameroon

    by steve-cameroon Written Jul 9, 2009

    Favorite thing: HEllo ,

    I am actually in Cameroon right now, working in Yaounde as an engineer after graduating in the USA.

    I can guarantee that the weather won't be a problem. Besides, you can always go to the beach in Kribi or in the north to visit Mont Cameroon and it should be sunny there.

    Honestly Cameroon is the last country in wich you could complain about the weather. It is true that it has been rainning unusually those last days, but it is still nothing compared to the rains in London for example where I have lived for 9 months.

    So you are welcome to Cameroon. If you need any more help or have anymore question, feel free to contact me

    Steve T.
    Cell:+237 75 29 99 09
    EMAIL: lecamer@gmail.com
    SKYPE ID: lecamer06

    Related to:
    • Women's Travel
    • Singles
    • Study Abroad

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  • IngaRita's Profile Photo

    Talk to the people

    by IngaRita Written Feb 23, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: My most favorite experiences where the ones that involved talking to the people that lived there. If you're in a village people will look at you because you are different but most of the time they are curious and the way to break the ice is to just say hello, good morning, how are you...

    Fondest memory: Village life. I stayed in a village for a month and I'll miss knowing my way around, knowing when the market is in town, when country sunday's are, how polite and respectful people are, knowing how to get a good meal.

    Walking down the street Dorothy- very sweet auntie

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  • lovin_it's Profile Photo

    The First Public Walk In Cameroon

    by lovin_it Updated Oct 25, 2006

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The Belo Public Walk is the first developed public walk route in Cameroon. It is a two and a half hour walk route through the countryside surrounding the village of Belo. It has route markers along the paths directing the trekker and information boards about local landmarks. Along the route you can see waterfalls and pools, the quarter head's traditional compound and the road built by the Germans.
    The best bit about it................It's free!

    Fondest memory: Trekking through the beautiful highlands without needing a guide.

    Belo Public Walk Route
    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Eco-Tourism

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  • lovin_it's Profile Photo

    Trekking The Bamenda Highlands

    by lovin_it Written Jun 21, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Trekking in the Bamenda Highlands from Mbingo to Belo, Belo to Lake Oku, Lake Oku to Afuah, Njinikom Plataeu, Fundong to Abuh or Abuh Forest to Lycom Palace. The options are endless, the sights breath taking, the wildlife and birds endemic and and the chance that your friends will ever do and see such things pretty small!

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Adventure Travel
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • Bernd_L's Profile Photo

    Always have some small change

    by Bernd_L Written Nov 22, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Money is often a problem in Cameroon. Don't expect that your credit card is accepted everywhere. Most of the shops don't.

    ATMs are rare and if you find one it might be temporarily out of order.

    So the best is cash. Either you bring dollars or preferably euros or traveller cheques to exchange.

    But ask for small bills. If you buy something most people are not able to give you back the change. Sometimes you will be forced to pay more or to waive the deal.

    So be prepared. Always have some small change in your pockets. And try to get rid of the 10.000 and 5.000 CFA-Franc-bills first.

    The currency of Cameroon - CFA-Franc

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  • Wafro's Profile Photo

    National Parks-Reserves-Sanctuaries-CAMEROON

    by Wafro Updated Jun 26, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: RAINFORESTS

    Korup National Park
    Lobeke National Park
    Campo Ma'an National Park
    Mbam and Djerem National Park

    Dja reserve
    Boumba-Bek/Nki Reserve
    Douala-Edea Reserve
    Deng-Deng Reserve
    Ebo Reserve
    Bambouko Reserve
    Makombe Reserve
    Rumpi Hills Reserve
    Ejagham Forest Reserve
    Takamanda Forest Reserve

    Banyang-Mbo Sanctuary
    Menegame Sanctuary

    Fondest memory: BUSH LANDS

    Waza National Park
    Kalamaloue National Park
    Benoue National Park
    Bouba Ndjidah National Park

    Kalfou Reserve
    Mandara Mountains Reserve
    Faro Reserve

    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park
    • Safari

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  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Kousseri, crossing the border

    by sachara Updated Apr 20, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Not many travellers pass the Kousseri border to Chad. So in Kousseri we saw only local people and didn't met any foreigner.
    One of the reasons are the safety problems along the road from Mora to Kousseri. Along this route we didn't encounter any problem, except a few kids throwing stones to our truck, after we refused to give them presents.
    It was the first and last time during our trip of 3 months in 9 countries in Africa, that we met kids doing this.
    About the safetyproblems we were told, that there were no robberies the last months, after the police has extended their controls along the road.

    Kousseri
    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Kousseri, it's hot at midday

    by sachara Updated Apr 20, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: We were in Kousseri, the most northern bordertown in Cameroon, at midday.
    It was amazing how many people walked in the mainstreet, at the hottest time of the day !
    But most of the people were sitting in the shade, looking at what's going on in their town (like our truck parked nearby in the shade), chatting and looking after their trade, many big sacks filled with onions.

    Kousseri, mainstreet

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  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Kousseri, bordertown

    by sachara Written Apr 20, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Kousseri is the bordertown at the Cameroon side of the border with Chad. After crossing the Logone river you are in Chad. From the border town Nguele at the Chad side it's only 7 Km to the capital N'Djamena.
    We arrived at the office of the authorities in Kousseri just before 12 am and heard the office is closed till 2 pm, so we got an unexpected long lunchbreak in Kousseri.
    Time for shopping (bread and juice for lunch) and a visit to a cybercafe.

    Kousseri, main street

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  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Impressive herds !

    by sachara Written Apr 20, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Travelling in Cameroon and other West African countries, I was always very impressed by the giant herds, I saw everywhere in the country-side.
    The zebus, the wide-horned cows are allready very impressive theirselves.
    But often I saw huge herds with those zebus, but also mixed with goats, sheeps and sometimes even donkeys and camels. Everytime it was breathtaking again !

    impressive herds !

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  • sachara's Profile Photo

    In which century do we live ?

    by sachara Updated Apr 20, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: When you see the traditional huts and transport by donkey, travelling in the countryside in the north of Cameroon, you can imagine that this is how people allready lived for centuries.
    It looks like the time stands still .....
    but when a local car is passing by at the road behind or you see the local people in a cybercafe in Kousseri, half an hour from this spot, you know better.

    near Kousseri, north Cameroon

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  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Traditional huts between Waza and Kousseri

    by sachara Updated Apr 20, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: On our way from Waza to Kousseri, the bordertown with Chad, we didn't see hardly any larger villages, only some scattered huts along the road. The traditional huts are made of mud and have thatched roofs. By the use of these natural materials, the huts form an perfect unity with their surroundings.
    I always wonder how the people can survive in these dry and barren areas.

    huts in the northern part of Cameroon

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  • sachara's Profile Photo

    From Waza NP to the border with Chad

    by sachara Updated Apr 20, 2004

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: From ''Parc National de Waza'' to the border with Chad is 150 KM. This part of our route seemed to be disreputable, because of armed robberies. So we had to drive together with two trucks and did have only one necessary sanitary stop.
    The landscape was rather flat, with some sorghum fields, marshlands and drier savannah-like parts. The route was not so interesting, that it was a pity, to cross this area rather fast.

    area north of Waza
    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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  • sachara's Profile Photo

    West of Maroua

    by sachara Updated Apr 20, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Travelling from Rhumsiki to Maroua we drove first through the wonderful mountaineous area around Rhumsiki. Approaching Maroua the landscape became more flat and green.
    As everywhere in the north of Cameroon in the rural areas, we saw a lot of herds of wide-horned cows (sometimes mixed with goats and sheeps) along the road.

    west of Maroua
    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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Cameroon Hotels

See all 10 Hotels in Cameroon
  • Hotel Akwa Palace

    920, Boulevard de la Liberte, Douala, 4007, Cameroon

    Satisfaction: Average

    Good for: Couples

  • Hilton Yaounde

    I went to stay there for a week but than I got out in two days. The reason I had booked was because...

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  • IBIS DOUALA

    This hotel has recently been renovated. The rooms are small but modern and well-kept.

    more

Top Cameroon Hotels

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