Fun things to do in Cameroon

  • Things to Do
    by Wafro
  • Things to Do
    by Wafro
  • Things to Do
    by Wafro

Most Viewed Things to Do in Cameroon

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    Ndong Aweh hill trek

    by lovin_it Written Sep 23, 2006

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    Trek up the beautiful hill dominating the N/E skyline of Belo. It's a nice easy 2 hour trek to the summit where there is a monument depicting the crusifixion on Calvery hill. The views from the top are magnificent and if you do the tour through berudep they include a visit to a traditional carvers on the way back down.

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    Horse Riding in the Highlands

    by lovin_it Updated Jul 15, 2006

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    Go horse riding in the Bamenda Highlands around Fundong. You can pick your horse from the herd, saddle up and head out for a hack. You can ride by yourself if you are experienced or go with a guide if you are not. The guy who owns the horses is great, speaks good english, can arrange lunch, show you round his farm and introduce you to his 3 wives and many children!

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    Sacred Lake Oku

    by lovin_it Updated Jun 21, 2006

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    Trek from Belo up to the mysterious lake Oku. Hike through the villages and into the forest where the natural world waits to be discovered. Sit on the shores of the sacred lake without another soul in sight . Swimming is not allowed in the lake as it is believed to be the home of an old man who decended into the lake after being given permission to live there by the Fon of the Oku people. Sacrafices are still made one day a year to the 'god' of the lake.

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    Visit the Fon's palace in Fundong

    by lovin_it Updated Jun 14, 2006

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    Have an audience with the Fon - King of the Kom tribe. It's a 2 hour trek from Fundong up to the Impenatrable palace sitting in the clouds overlooking the kingdom of Kom.
    You need to arrange the visit with BERUDEP in Belo or Fundong and buy a bottle of wine as a 'gift' to send to the Fon in advance to see if he will accept your wish for an audience. You will also have to take with you a gift of money in an envelope to present to him when you arrive (the amount is up to you). After this you will be invited to stay in the kings court and watch the proceedings of traditional cases, tribal matters, disputes as well as enjoy lunch, beer, wine, fanta or whatever other gifts the Fon has been given that day.

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    Belo 3 Corners

    by lovin_it Updated Jun 13, 2006

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    Situated 45 mins shared taxi ride from Bamenda in the North West province is the picturesque highland village of Belo 3 Corners. Although not mentioned in any guidebooks yet this beautiful village is the access point to a secret paradise for the outdoor enthusiast. The vast opportunity for trekking, mountain biking, camping, birdwatching, and walking is superb. Add to this the Unique cultures of the Kom tribe and the Fulani herdsmen, juju death celebration dances and christian accapellas, the opportunities off the beaten track are still as yet largely undiscovered.

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    The home stay experience

    by lovin_it Written Jun 2, 2006

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    Trek up into the mountains around Fundong and meet a family from the Fulani tribe.
    Walk through the village and meet the friends and relatives (there are many!!)
    Walk for water with the children.
    Stop at the local market and buy some fresh fruit.
    Walk to the waterfalls and caves.
    Ride horses and milk cows.
    Pound fufu-corn for dinner.
    Talk and roast corn round a fire pit.
    Share dinner with the family and listen to stories from long ago.
    Sleep in the traditional Mud brick house with a real Fulani family.......

    The simple life is an experience few of us know.........but for me turned out to be the best.

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    Abuh forest treck - NW province near Fundong

    by lovin_it Updated Jun 2, 2006

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    There are 11 protected forests in the North West province of Cameroon. None are yet developed for tourists, except one (Abuh) and then it is only possible to enter with a guide. This is an absolute must for any trek/hike/wildlife enthusiasts and garauntees an experience of a life time.
    The trek itself begins in Abuh village with a steep climb up the side of the valley through the small farms of mangos, bananas, passion fruit, corn and coffee. Arrival at the top is a welcome relief but the hard earned views for miles around are spectacular. The views across the forest down to the Fon's (chief's) palace is beautiful. Entrance to the forest is well concealed and the guide produces a machette and goes to work leading the way. After pushing through the 7ft grass, shrubs and undergrowth a magic kingdom is revealed. A flat grassy plataeu in the middle of the forest with a lone Fulani Herdsmans house in the corner, enclosed by a hedge of angel wing flowers (a bit like tall waterlillies).
    Entering back into the forest again we passed through a few streams, a swamp, and a big pile of monkey poo, unfortunately no monkeys that day. We then decended down through the thick under growth to visit a sacred cave containing thousands of fruit bats which had a beautiful waterfall flowing over the top of it. From here it was a steep decsent back to Abuh village (often on my backside).

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    Parc National de Wasa

    by worldtraveler55 Updated Nov 5, 2005

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    Parc National de Wasa

    Waza is the most accessible of Cameroon's national parks and the best for viewing wildlife.
    While it can't compare with East African parks, you're likely to see elephants, hippos, giraffes, antilopes, many birds and - with luck - lions.
    Late March to April is the best time to viewing, as the animals congregate at water holes before the rains.
    May and October rains make some sections of the park inaccessible.

    see my bird-pages for more pictures.

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    Mnt Cameroon

    by worldtraveler55 Updated Nov 4, 2005

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    Mount Cameroon

    Mount Cameroon (4.095m) is the highest mountain in West Africa, rising more or less straight from the coast through tropical rainforest to a bare summit which is cold and windy and occasionally brushed with snow.
    It is not dormant and sent lava flowing down almost to the sea only last year.
    Although it is so close to the sea it can rarely be seen from the coast as clouds gather round its lower slopes and Debuncha at its southwest corner is reputed to be the second wettest place in the world.
    I did climb the mountain; see my Climbing Mt Cameroon pages for the story

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    Kumba (Barombi Mbo)

    by worldtraveler55 Updated Oct 23, 2005

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    Barombi Mbo

    Cameroon still has active volcanoes along the coast of the Atlantic Ocean, including Mt. Cameroon, which at 13,350 feet (4,070 m) is one of the highest in Africa.
    Some of the country's former volcanoes are more inland and are now occupied by lakes such as Barombi Mbo
    These Crater Lakes are very old and quite isolated.
    As a result, many species live in this ecoregion and nowhere else.

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    Pouss (Palais du Lamido)

    by worldtraveler55 Updated Oct 23, 2005

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    Palais du Lamido

    The population of the northern Cameroon is composed of many ethnic groups living in centralised and hierarchized socio-political entities.
    The Sultan governs his community and his fellows owe respect and recognition to him and to his power.
    The Fulani Lamidats (Territory ruled by a Lamido - a king or sultan), are among the main important traditional chieftaincies with their economies based mainly on agriculture and animal husbandry.
    These Lamidats have reached their peak and started already to decline during the colonisation period.
    The colonizers have introduced many restrictions to the power of the Lamido and obliged him to share his land and his power with them.
    The Lamidats and the sultanates are political and administrative units, which are rooted on the local traditions and Islam.
    The culture of the ruling Lamido (his ethnic group) has a considerable influence on the cultures of the rest of the population.

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    N'Gaoundere (Palais du Lamido)

    by worldtraveler55 Updated Oct 23, 2005

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    Palais du Lamido

    The Palais du Lamido is the place where the local chief resides with his numerous wives. The exterior isn't interesting but some of the traditional buildings inside are.
    Among other things at the Palais, you can see where the Lamido holds court and conducts mariages, and where the royal barber plies his trade (the present Lamido apparently follows a rigorous twice weekly barbering routine).
    Friday (escpecially) and Sunday are thebest days to visit, as you'll be able to see many nobles from surrounding area who come tp pay their respects.

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    Maga (Lake Maga)

    by worldtraveler55 Updated Oct 23, 2005

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    Lake Maga

    Lake Maga, an artificial wetland resulting from the construction of Maga dam in 1979, is located upstream of the Logone flood-plain, immediately south of the town of Maga and bordering the Logone river to the east, which forms the international frontier with Chad.
    It is the only open water in the area and is primarily fed by temporary watercourses draining the Mandara mountains and the Maroua plain to the west.
    The lake’s average depth does not exceed 3 m and fluctuates greatly in size, giving it many characteristics of a flood-plain.
    In the middle off the lake are some islands where fisherman live; and with some luck you can find hippo s.

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    Pouss (casus obus)

    by worldtraveler55 Updated Oct 23, 2005

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    casus obus

    The Mousgoum huts have been famous since the 19th century. Their grand size, curved features and slender shapes have surprised many travellers stopping in the Mousgoum villages. The explorers Heinrich Barth in 1852, Schweinfurt in 1868 and Nachtigal in 1872, allude to these structures in their writings as 'hutshells', a term that was later translated by the French colonisers as 'cases obus'.
    Unfortunately, this magnificent architectural culture is slowly disappearing. The few huts still standing that one can admire, which include several in ruins, are located in the Canton of Pouss.

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    Banyo-Foumban

    by worldtraveler55 Updated Oct 23, 2005

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    Banyo-Foumban

    On the road from Banyo-Foumban we visited the villages off Magba and Manki.
    In Magba we met some very nice woman who loved to let us see there houses, and in Manki we met some Nigerans who where wandering around with there herd

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