Aswan Things to Do

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Most Recent Things to Do in Aswan

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    THE ASWAN HIGH DAM

    by DAO Written Apr 15, 2014
    THE ASWAN HIGH DAM
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    The original Aswan Low Dam was built to try and regulate the annual flooding across Egypt and generate electricity. The more famous High Dam, the focus of this tip, was built between 1960-1970 and is vastly larger. In fact, its just vast. Here are a few amazing facts:

    • It is 12,562 feet/2.34 miles (3,830 metres) long and 364 feet (111 metres) high
    • It created Lake Nasser with a gross capacity of 5.97 trillion cubic feet (169 billion cubic metres)
    • The Aswan Dam contributes more than half of the total power supply in Egypt.
    • It generates up to 10 billion kilowatts per hour of hydroelectric power. This is enough electricity to run 1 million colour televisions for more than 20 years.
    • Before construction, many Ancient Egyptian monuments (such as the statue of Ramses the Great in Abu Simbel) had to be moved
    • Greek-Egyptian engineer Adrian Daninos created the original plan in 1912
    • The final plan was written by British engineers but built by a different team of engineers from the Soviet Union.

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    Unfinished obelisk

    by solopes Updated Jan 1, 2014

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    Obelisk - Aswan

    Erecting the obelisks should have been a hell of a job.

    If we remember that most of them were cut in Aswan, and carried down the Nile, the work turns Cyclopean. The cutting of the Unfinished Obelisk in the Northern Quarry of Aswan, stopped when a crack appeared, as it was being extracted from the rock.

    It would have weighed over one thousand tons, and would have been the largest piece of stone ever handled. Now it became the first tourist attraction in Aswan, making us think how would they move it.

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    Philae, Temple of Isis

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Dec 22, 2013

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    Philae, Temple of Isis
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    Constructed during the Greco-Roman times, this temple was rescued from the the bottom of Lake Nassar in the 1970's and brought to this island. It's original construction took 800 years and was built during a period when the Cult of Isis was spreading throughout the Roman empire.

    The temple was later converted to a Christian monastery before being abandoned after the Islamic conversion of Egypt.

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    Aswan Botanical Garden

    by shavy Written Dec 15, 2013
    View from the botanic garden
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    On the West Bank the desolate hillside is dotted with the Tombs of the Nobles which your qualified Egyptologist guide will give a brief history of as you sail by
    The felucca ride to Kitchener Island takes around 20 minutes, depending on wind speed and Nile currents

    Visit the small botanical museum before strolling through the tranquil gardens which are home to many exotic species of plants and trees imported from all around the world
    The Aswan Botanic Gardens are a quiet and peaceful oasis from the hustle and bustle of everyday Egyptian life, and young couples and families from Aswan often spend their day enjoying the island

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    Aswan

    by shavy Written Dec 15, 2013
    All cruise ship arrives here
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    Is the smallest of the three major tourist cities on the Nile. Being the furthest south of the three, it has a large population of Nubian people, mostly resettled from their homeland in the area flooded by Lake Nasser

    Dozens of cruise ships depart from Luxor to Aswan everyday. These can be arranged by your travel agent before you coming here. And is very interesting to you book a round trip with excursions, get off and on out the cruise ship visiting the sights with a local guide
    Aswan is compact enough to primarily on foot from the port to the center

    Visiting to the sights in the area, you need to have a local guide if you want to know or understand the history of the past

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    Kalabsha Temple

    by shavy Written Dec 15, 2013
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    It is very easy to get here if you have a vehicle or going on tour, as we are on tour this include in the program
    Only most of the private vehicle you see in this area
    On the banks of Lake Nasser lies Kalabsha Temple, an often overlooked jewel of Aswan. It was just one of 18 temples and monuments moved in order to preserve them from the rising Nile waters created by the construction of Aswan's High Dam

    The temple which is dedicated to the Egyptian god Horus and the Nubian god Mandulis was originally built just after the Ptolemy period, the era after Alexander the Great's death (323BC)

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    Philae Temple

    by shavy Written Dec 15, 2013
    Front of theTemple
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    Is another Temple with so much of history. As part of UNESCO's project to rescue the ancient monuments threatened by the river damming, the island was itself dammed. Now the temple is on the higher, surrounded by a high wall

    The temple is in holy island in the Nile River where the ancient Egyptians built a temple to the goddess Isis. Isis was a very important goddess in ancient times. She was known as the Mother of God, giver of life, protector and healer of kings and her temple was once the site of many pilgrimages

    Today, the island is used by small boats mooring on the southern flank. Hence one has an immediate view of the great Isis Temple with colonnade that the visitor seems to embrace
    Now the temple is on the higher, nearby Agilka Island and worthy of a visit

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    Temple of Kom Ombo

    by RavensWing Updated Oct 18, 2013

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    Mummified Crocodile
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    This is an unusual temple because it is duplicated, mirroring itself on either side of a central axis. This is because it was dedicated to two gods: Sobek, god of fertility and creator of the world along with Hathor and Khonsu, and also Horus, and each needed their own set of rooms. Sobek was the crocodile god so, of course, crocodiles were mummified for him.

    The right side of the Temple is dedicated to Sobek-Re (a crocodile God combined with the sun God Re) along with his wife and son. Sobek is associated with Seth, the enemy of Horus. In the myth of Horus and Osiris, Seth and his followers changed themselves into crocodiles to escape. The ancient Egyptians believed that by honoring the fearsome crocodile as a god, they would be safe from attacks.

    The left side is dedicated to Haroeris, the "Good Doctor" (a form of the falcon-headed god Horus the Elder) along with his consort Ta-Sent-Nefer, the "Good Sister" (another form of Hathor).

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    Edfu Temple

    by RavensWing Written Oct 18, 2013

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    Sanctuary of Horus
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    The Edfu Temple is also known as the Temple of Horus (the Falcon headed God) There are falcons that guard the entrance to the Temple

    The pylons show the God Horus, his wife, the Goddess Hathor, and the Pharaoh, grabbing his enemies by the hair, ready to smash their heads, a typical propaganda pose of the Pharaoh. The entrance is flanked by two huge, exquisite granite Horus falcons. It leads into the Great Court. The walls here are lined with reliefs, one of them showing the "Feast of the Beautiful Meeting". Annually Horus of Edfu and Hathor of Dendara were brought together during a big celebration.

    The sacred barge on which the golden statue was carried to reunite Horus with his wife Hathor during the annual festival. (Main Picture)

    Most visitors arrive by cruise boat and either walk to the temple or take horse drawn carriages.

    Ticket Information:
    The Temple of Horus is open 7am-4pm (to 5pm June-Sept). Entry costs LE 35.

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    Temple of Philae

    by RavensWing Updated Oct 18, 2013

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    The Temple of Isis
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    Philae island is famous for the legend of Isis and Osiris. The pylons within the temple of Isis contain depictions of the deities involved in this famous ancient Egyptian myth. Goddess Isis is the wife of Osiris and mother of God Horus. In the myth Osiris was murdered by his brother the wicked God Seth. Seth scattered Osiris pieces in various places. Isis tirelessly searched for Osiris's body parts and then using her Goddess powers to join the pieces together and bring Osiris back to life. Following Osiris' resurrection Isis and Osiris conceived Horus. Osiris then adopted the role of "God of the under world and judge of the dead. At the end of the tale Horus grows up to avenges his father by defeating Seth in combat.

    Philae is the legendary resting place of Osiris. Isis is associated with funeral rites but as she resurrected Osiris and is the mother of of Horus she is also the giver of life, a healer and protector of kings.

    The entrance fee to get on the island is 50LE.

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    The Unfinished Obelisk

    by RavensWing Updated Oct 18, 2013

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    Unfinished Obelisk - Cracked
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    The unfinished obelisk is the largest known ancient obelisk that is found in Aswan. The obelisk is carved directly out of the bedrock, but a crack appeared in the granite and the project was abandoned.

    Entrance to see the Obelisk is 30LE

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    Army Escort to Abu Simbel

    by RavensWing Updated Oct 18, 2013

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    Ramses Temple
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    We got up nice and early to meet up with the convoy heading to Abu Simbel. We found our place in the convoy and waited for the signal to go. There was an army truck inbetween each tourist van. It was a 3 hours trip south to Abu Simbel. No stops! No washrooms breaks! It was extremely hot even in our air-conditioned van.

    Once there we were advised to have a washroom break before heading to the temple. Once again check my tourist trap about the Public Washrooms This time we paid to go in, but there was no ONE sheet of toilet paper handed to us.

    We headed to the temple of Abu Simbel. This Temple, like the Temple of Isis (Philae) had to be disassembled, cut into pieces and reassembled in a new spot. The Dam threatened to drown the original temple so it was moved and reassembled.

    You are not allowed to take pictures inside the temple, you are not allowed to touch the walls either. There is paint on the pictures that has been there since the temple was built. Sure makes me wonder what they did to their paint that makes it stay on a surface for 6000 years or so when I can't keep it on my walls for much longer than 10 years.

    The most remarkable feature of the site is that the temple is precisely oriented so that twice every year, on 22 February and 22 October, the first rays of the morning sun shine down the entire length of the temple-cave to illuminate the back wall of the innermost shrine and the statues of the four gods seated there. How they were able to construct this so that the sun falls directly on the face of Abu Simbel (I believe one date is his birthday the other his coronation, I will never know)

    We left the temple and walked to the covered canteen. It was 56 degrees Celsius in the sun in the middle of November. Once all of us were ready to go, we headed to our van. We wouldn't be in an army convoy going back but we would have 2 soldiers in our van with us. We stopped halfway for a washroom break. That meant try to find some cover and go. Well I skipped that, I had no desire to have a scorpion or snake take a bite out of my bottom.

    It costs 80LE to get into to see both temples.

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    Nubian Dinner and a Show

    by RavensWing Written Oct 18, 2013

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    Other Tables at the Nubian Place
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    Oh this was such fun. It was a total surprise that we were going here. Carole, our tour leader had taken a poll to see how many of us wanted to go to a traditional Nubian Dinner and Show. Well of course we all said yes. She called someone and asked if there was a chance we could come for the traditional dinner. Hooray we an go!

    We grab a ride to the dock where we will hope onto a boat and take a quick ride from the East Bank to the West Bank of the Nile. We make it there and walk up the hill to the dining area. We are the only ones that are here, they opened just for us. I can't remember how much the exact cost was,but I remember it being fairly cheap for a meal (maybe 30LE - 50LE). We picked our table, which just happened to be directly in front of the stage area where we would watch the show. They came to ask us what we wanted to drink. Then they began serving us our food. There were many different salads, dips,bread, vegetable and I had ordered the beef.

    Then the entertainment began. Nubian dancers dancing their traditional dances. They made us all get up and dance in a line. Then at the last skit was 5 of us up there basically playing Simon Says. The leader was one of the Nubian men and he made us all laugh. After the entertainment was over, some of us got to hold a baby alligator. Then it was time to go. We thanked our hosts for a magnificent meal and fantastic entertainment. Back on the boats and back to our hotel.

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    Philae Temple

    by solopes Updated Jan 29, 2013
    Aswan - Egypt
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    The construction of the dam raised the waters, covering, amidst other things, the temple of Philae.

    Tourism was already the top business in Egypt, and the decision to preserve it was easy - an artificial island was built, and the temple dismounted and rebuilt on it. Now, a boat is need to visit it, in a short and pleasant trip.

    Read carefully when booking a package. We joined a spanish group, but we were the only ones to make this visit, while they were transported back to the boat, waiting for us. It was not in their program...

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    Dam

    by solopes Updated May 29, 2012

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    Aswan - Egypt
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    Located near Aswan, the world famous High Dam was an engineering miracle when it was built in the 1960s. It contains 18 times the material used in the Great Pyramid of Cheops. The Dam is 11,811 feet long, 3215 feet thick at the base and 364 feet tall. Today it provides irrigation and electricity for the whole Egypt and, together with the old Aswan Dam built by the British between 1898 and 1902, 6 km down river, wonderful views for visitors.

    From the top of the two Mile long High Dam you can gaze across Lake Nasser, the huge reservoir created when it was built, to Kalabsha temple in the south and the huge power station to the north.

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