Kawm Umbu Things to Do

  • Kom Ombo Temple
    Kom Ombo Temple
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Kom Ombo - Hypostyle Hall
    Kom Ombo - Hypostyle Hall
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Kom Ombo Temple - Second Hypostyle Hall
    Kom Ombo Temple - Second Hypostyle Hall
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey

Most Recent Things to Do in Kawm Umbu

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    Hathor Chapel and Crocodile

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Aug 31, 2007

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    Kom Ombo Temple - Crocodile
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    To the right side of the Temple there is a small room, which firstly was built and dedicated to goddess Hathor. Now it is used to display mummified crocodiles, which were found in the vicinity of the Temple. A few of the three-hundred crocodile mummies discovered in the vicinity are displayed inside the Temple.

    Sobek’s chief sanctuary was at Kom Ombo, where there were once huge numbers of crocodiles. Until recent times the Egyptian Nile was infested with these ferocious animals, who would lay on the riverbank and devour animals and humans alike. So it is not surprising that the local inhabitants went in fear.

    They believed that as a totem animal, and object of worship, it would not attack them. Captive crocodiles were kept within the temple and many mummified crocodiles have been found in cemeteries, some of which can be seen in the temple sanctuary today.

    You may see the final Kom-Ombo Temple scenery on my 2 min 56 sec Kom Ombo Temple final scenery VIDEO clip

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    Ancient Calendar

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Aug 31, 2007

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    Kom Ombo Temple - Ancient Calendar
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    One of the most interesting things is the long list of calendars telling us about the various festivals dedicated to various gods.

    You may see Outer Wall of Kom-Ombo on my 3 min 05 sec Kom Ombo Outer Wall VIDEO clip

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    Medicine Instruments

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Aug 31, 2007

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    Kom Ombo Temple - Medicine reliefs
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    The left side of the Temple is dedicated Horus who was also known as the good doctor. The Temple became famous for its healing power. It was a major pilgrimage site here a healing cult was developed and the temple was a sanctuary for many patients who were seeking help and treatment by the priests. They would fast for a night in the Temple precinct. It depicts a whole series of surgeon's instruments; confirming once again the high degree of skill achieved in the field of medicine.

    There is a very remarkable scene on the inner side of the back wall of the Temple. It shows the first illustration of medical and surgery tools, which are presented, to a seated god. There you may see scalpels, suction cap, bone saws, and dental tools.

    You may see Outer Wall and medicine relieves of Kom-Ombo on my 4 min 02 sec Kom Ombo Outer Wall VIDEO clip

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    Second Hypostyle Hall

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Aug 31, 2007

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    Kom Ombo Temple - Second Hypostyle Hall
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    The rear wall leads to the Second Hypostyle Hall that leads to twin entrances and has 15 columns. Five of them are incorporated in the front wall. This section shows Ptolemy VII holding hymnal texts before the Nile gods.

    The Second Hypostyle Hall repeats the design of the first one on a smaller scale and again allows two separate processional paths towards the inner sanctuaries behind the three narrow transverse halls or vestibules. The staircases to the roof were located at either end of the Second Hall. Similar to the arrangement at Edfu, the northern staircase was right-angled, while the southern one was straight. The drainage system of the roof included lion-headed waterspouts.

    You may see the Temple of Kom-Ombo on my 3 min 18 sec Kom Ombo Temple VIDEO clip

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    Hypostyle Hall of Ptolemy XII

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Aug 31, 2007

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    Kom Ombo - Hypostyle Hall
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    The First Hypostyle Hall has papyrus capitals on the columns. There is an inventory of the scared places of Egypt, the gods of the main towns and the local and national festivals.

    Overall, the relief sculpture is typical of the Ptolemaic and Roman periods, with very deeply carved sunken reliefs on the exterior walls and columns, and fine quality bas-relief on the interior walls. Much of the relief is covered with a very thin layer of plaster, and the original colour survives in many places.

    The capitals of the columns within, arranged in two rows of five free standing columns, are often wrought with ingenious compound forms. As would be expected, the decoration of the Hall and remaining parts of the Temple is divided between the two gods, with scenes of Sobek on the east and Horus on the west.
    The ceiling is decorated with astronomical scenes.

    You may see the First Hypostyle Hall of the Kom-Ombo Temple on my 2 min 07 sec Kom Ombo First Hypostyle Hall VIDEO clip

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    Entrance and Courtyard of Augustus

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Aug 31, 2007

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    Kom Ombo Temple
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    The entrance into the Temple is located to the Easter side. There is an ancient Gate built by Neos Dionysus (Ptolemy XIII). Then you will see Mud brick Enclosure Wall and the Birth House of Ptolemy VII (Mammissi). The Birth House is the nearest building to the river. Its western half was destroyed, so little of it remained till now.

    The first Pylon of the Temple was unfortunately destroyed as well. Only stones of the foundation and part of the Wall remained. The emperor Augustus constructed this Courtyard. The entrance is dived into two gateways. Each leads to one half of the Temple dedicated to each the twin deities.

    Everything is duplicated along the main axis. There are two entrances, two Courts, two Colonnades, two Hypostyle Halls and two Sanctuaries.

    You may see the entrance into the Temple of Kom-Ombo and Courtyard on my 2 min 30 sec Kom Ombo Courtyard VIDEO clip

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    Temple of Kom Ombo

    by misr Updated Dec 31, 2006
    Temple of Kom Ombo
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    This temple is just beside the river Nile. Kom Ombo is the temple of two gods, Haroeris and Sobek. There are three mummified crocodiles on the place too.
    Entrance fee to the temple was in march 2006, 20 L.E (Egyptian pound)

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  • The Dramatic Temple

    by dwjohnsonla Updated Jun 2, 2006

    The Temple of Kom Ombo, with its dramatic setting on a bluff overlooking a bend in the Nile, is a sight to be savored. I went to Egypt knowing of other more famous sites, but came away awestruck by the dramatic beauty of this lesser known site. The tall wide main columns, with their elaborately ornate Ptolemaic crowns, are striking as they stand prominently on the bluff above the Nile. The scene is potentially even more dramatic when viewed from the river at night.

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    Hathor Shrine at the Temple of Kom Ombo

    by hez28 Updated May 28, 2006
    mummified crocodile
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    Hathor Shrine is located on the right side of the temple. This is where u can find some mummified crocodiles, and their clay coffins which were dug up from a nearby animal cemetery.

    Ancient Egyptians practised the mummification of animals as well, not just human; as animals were worshipped in the Pharaonic times, i.e cat, ibis, falcon, crocodile. But it was during the Graeco-Roman times that this animal-worship became a cult. Ancient Egyptians would buy mummified animals and present them to the god as a gift.

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    Temple of Kom Ombo

    by hez28 Written May 28, 2006
    Temple of Kom Ombo in the evening
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    The Temple of Kom Ombo is a temple for Sobek and Haroeris (Horus the Elder). Because of this “double worship”, the temple was uniquely designed in double structures, i.e. two entrances, two hypostyle halls, two courts, two sanctuaries, etc. The left side of the temple is dedicated to Haroeris, and the right side to Sobek, the local crocodile god. This is quite a new temple, built in the Ptolemaic times.

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    Birdlife at Temple of Sobek

    by atufft Written May 26, 2006

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    Birds make their home at Temple of Sobek
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    After the cruise tourists had boarded their ship and left, some birds flew and filled holes in the artwork. The aligators are long gone, so I assume the birds are hardly afraid of Sobek. I watched this for awhile until my wife arrived. Then, I proceded to shoot a few more pictures of rear temples. In one of them is the so-called stethescope, which in reality looked to me like the overing of some kind of medalion by Horus. Later, we left...

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    More things to see at Temple of Sobek

    by atufft Written May 26, 2006

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    Relief at Temple of Sobek
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    Besides the variety of deep cut reliefs at the Temple of Sobek, one can get a fair idea of what the identical temple of Horus looked like by examining it's foundation remains. There is also the Sanctuary of Sobek and Horus, which is the end place of them main temple. The doorways to some rear chambers are impressive for their ornate Greek style lintels

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    Interior Paint and Artwork of Temple of Sobek

    by atufft Written May 26, 2006

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    Vultures in Ceiling of Temple of Sobek
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    Occasionally there are places, where the sun doesn't ever reach directly. where faint paint can still be found. The entire temple was painted in antiquity. The most common paint are of vultures on the entrance lintels, but there is also faint paint on walls with deep shadows. Most of the paint on the deep cut reliefs is completely absent, but because the carving is so deep, the quality of the artwork remains fresh and bold in appearance.

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    Entrance and Columns of Temple of Sobek

    by atufft Written May 26, 2006

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    Entrance Colonnade at Kwam Umbo
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    The minivan drops off passengers very close to the Temple, so it's fairly easy to walk to the entrance. Those coming by boat will step foot onto a concrete quay right at the temple grounds. The entrance we took, via the road passed a sign, providing some information in English, and then we had to pay a small entrance fee. The temple entrance is very grand series of columns and lintels.

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  • Surgical Instruments

    by stemc Updated Oct 31, 2005

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    did modern medicine start here

    Sobek was the Egyptian god of medicine on the back wall on the left hand side of the temple is relifs of surgical instruments and a relif of a women that looks like she is giving birth on a birthing chair

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