Temple of Abu Simbel Favorites

  • Abu Simbel - My ticket
    Abu Simbel - My ticket
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Abu Simbel - Great Temple
    Abu Simbel - Great Temple
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Abu Simbel - Small Temple
    Abu Simbel - Small Temple
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey

Most Recent Favorites in Temple of Abu Simbel

  • Luchonda's Profile Photo

    Kasr Ibrim

    by Luchonda Updated Jan 11, 2008

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    Kasr Ibrim

    Favorite thing: Can you find the two birds sitting on the stones of this old fortress???
    Anyhow this ruin of a fortress was that time important to defend the southern part of Egypt
    it is located very near the temple of Abu Simble

    Fondest memory: All those above mentioned places, far away from the touristic beathen areas, so undiscovered (yet)

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  • Luchonda's Profile Photo

    Kasr Ibrim

    by Luchonda Updated Jan 11, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Kasr Ibrim

    Favorite thing: I visited Egypt for the first time 10 years ago.
    From Luxor to Aswan and back to Cairo.
    This time i was interested in visiting the lower part of Egypt - ancient Nubia and as highlight the temple of Abu Simbel, arriving there not by plane or bus, but by boat.
    I will never regret this decision because I saw some rather unknown places, temples, tombs.
    - The Kalabsha Temple
    - The Wadi El Sebou and Dakka complex
    - The ruins of Kasr Ibrim
    - The Penout tomb

    Fondest memory: All those above mentioned places, far away from the touristic beathen areas, so undiscovered (yet)

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Abu Simbel Temples Museum

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Sep 19, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Abu Simbel - My ticket

    Favorite thing: Open hours 7.00 – 14.00.
    Entry fee 70LE ($14).
    Photo and video are allowed only outside the Temples and forbidden inside.
    Guided tours are also only outside and forbidden inside.

    Several useful links:
    touregypt.net and Marie Parsons

    wikipedia

    egyptvoyager.com

    planerware.com

    You may watch my VIDEO-Clip on my personal YouTube channel: 2 min 20sec Egypt Abu Simbel Surroundings 2007 .

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Temples Rediscovery

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Sep 17, 2007

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    Abu Simbel - Roberts drawing
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: The Temples became covered by sand with the passing of time. Historians told us that the sand covered the statues of the main temple up to their knees already in the VI-th century BC. The Temples were forgotten until almost nowadays. Europeans did not see this temple until Burckhardt discovered it in 1813.

    Even Napoleon during his famous Egyptian expedition knew nothing about the Temples. Swiss orientalist Burckhardt found the top frieze of the main Temple. Burckhardt talked about his discovery with Italian explorer Belzoni, who travelled to the site, but was unable to dig out an entry to the Temple. Belzoni returned in 1817. Then he succeeded in his attempt to enter the Temple.

    You may see the David Roberts drawing (1838-39) at the first and the second pics.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    “Abu Simbel” legend

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Sep 17, 2007

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    Abu Simbel Great Temple
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: Why do we call the Temple complex “Abu Simbel”?
    There is a legend which guides often tell the tourists. Abu Simbel was a name of a young local boy who guided early re-discoverers to the site of the buried Temple, which he had seen from time to time in the shifting sands.

    Eventually, Burckhardt and Belzoni named the Temple complex after him: Abu Simbel.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Temples Relocation

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Sep 17, 2007

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    Abu Simbel - Temples location reconstruction
    2 more images

    Favorite thing: Removal and reconstruction of the two Temples at Abu Simbel was an historic event in itself. The Temples were under threat from the rising waters of the Nile that were about to result from the construction of the Aswan High Dam in 1950th – 1960th. The relocation of the temples was necessary to avoid being submerged during the creation of Lake Nasser, the massive artificial water reservoir formed after the building of the Aswan dam on the Nile River.
    The Egyptian Government secured the support of UNESCO and launched a worldwide appeal.

    During the salvage operation, which began in 1964 and continued until 1968, the two Temples were dismantled and raised over 65 meters up the sandstone cliff and 200 m back from the river where they had been built. We may consider it one of the greatest feats of archaeological engineering.

    They were reassembled in the exact same relationship to each other and the sun. After that they were covered with an artificial mountain.

    You may see how it would look like if the originals stayed at the same place under the Nile waters at my photo, which I made in Nubia Museum in Aswan.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Small Temple General History background

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Sep 17, 2007

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    Abu Simbel - Small Temple
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: There is the Small Temple of Abu Simbel to the north of the Great Temple. It can be reached by way of a gate constructed by Ramesses in the brick wall enclosing the forecourt.

    The Temple of Hathor and Nefertari, also known as the Small Temple, was built about one hundred meters northeast of the Temple of Ramesses II and was dedicated to the goddess Hathor and Ramesses II's chief consort, Nefertari. This was in fact the first time in ancient Egyptian history that a temple was dedicated to a queen.

    Nefertari was the most beloved wife of Ramesses (in total, the pharaoh had some 200 wives and concubines).

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Great Temple General History background

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Sep 17, 2007

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    Abu Simbel - Great Temple
    4 more images

    Favorite thing: The Giza Pyramids and the Great Temple of Abu Simbel present the most familiar images of ancient Egypt.

    Abu Simbel is an archaeological site comprising two massive rock Temples in southern Egypt on the western bank of Lake Nasser about 290 km southwest of Aswan.
    It is considered that the twin Temples was originally carved out of the mountainside during the reign of Pharaoh Ramesses II in the XIII-th century BC. He constructed the monument to himself and his queen Nefertari. Also he wanted to commemorate his alleged victory at the Battle of Kadesh, and to intimidate his Nubian neighbours.

    The main Temple was dedicated to Ramesses II and to the four universal gods Ptah, Re-Harakhte, Amun-Re, and to Ramesses II himself. Abu Simbel is considered to be the most impressive of the seven temples, which Ramesses II built.

    The Great Temple was hewn out of the rock to a depth of about 60 m. The axis of the Temple was aligned from west to east in such a way that twice every year, on February 20 and October 20 (now one day later, on February 21 and October 21), the rays of the rising sun reached the divine figures on the rear wall of the sanctuary.

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  • veigapaula's Profile Photo

    Lake Nasser temples

    by veigapaula Updated Mar 25, 2007

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    Amada
    4 more images

    Favorite thing: between Aswan and Abu Simbel you have:

    the Kertassi kiosk with Hathors dedicated to Isis
    Beit el Wadi where a monument is rected to comemorate victory over enemies
    Kalabsha where you have Nubian versions of Pharaonic deities
    El Dakka or El Dek where you have Sekhmet
    Wadi el Sebua the little Luxor temple
    Amada filled with colors (still...)
    Pennut's tomb
    Kasr Ibrahim ancient Ronam fortress in ruins

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  • 1gorams's Profile Photo

    abu simbel

    by 1gorams Updated Mar 19, 2007
    larger temple floor plan
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: my favorite thing is just appreciating the enormous job of relocating the temple to higher grounds.

    Fondest memory: I will miss the bluest sky, along with the equally blue waters of lake nassar. Just hanging out and also doing some people watching.

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  • miman's Profile Photo

    Rediscovery and relocation of Abu Simbel temple

    by miman Written Jul 31, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Abu Simbel - large temple

    Favorite thing: With the passing of time, the temples became covered by sand. Already in the 6th century BC, the sand covered the statues of the main temple up to their knees. The temple was forgotten until 1813, when Swiss orientalist JL Burckhardt found the top frieze of the main temple. Burckhardt talked about his discovery with Italian explorer Giovanni Belzoni, who travelled to the site, unable to dig out an entry to the temple. Belzoni returned in 1817, this time succeeding in his attempt to enter the complex. He took everything valuable and portable with him.

    In 1959 an international donations campaign to save the monuments of Nubia began: the southernmost relics of this ancient human civilization were under threat from the rising waters of the Nile that were about to result from the construction of the Aswan High Dam. Later Abu Simbel temples were moved from Sudanese lands into Egyptian lands.
    The salvage of the Abu Simbel temples began in 1964, and cost some USD $80 million. Between 1964 and 1968, the entire site was cut into large blocks, dismantled and reassembled in a new location – 65 m higher and 200 m back from the river, in what many consider one of the greatest feats of archaeological engineering. Today, thousands of tourists visit the temples daily. Guarded convoys of buses and cars depart twice a day from Aswan, the nearest city. Many visitors also arrive by plane, at an airfield that was specially constructed for the temple complex.

    Fondest memory: Not only are the two temples at Abu Simbel among the most magnificent monuments in the world but their removal and reconstruction was an historic event in itself. Temples were reassembled, in the exact same relationship to each other and the sun, and covered with an artificial mountain. Most of the joins in the stone have now been filled by antiquity experts, but inside the temples it is still possible to see where the blocks were cut.

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  • CandS's Profile Photo

    Outside the temples

    by CandS Updated Jun 6, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Abu Simbel

    Favorite thing: Make sure you spend some time checking out the amazing buildings up close from the outside too...there are some amazing statues and carvings on the temples. I really loved the huge statues at the entrance to the temples but also the carvings on the sides of the temples are really beautiful...

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  • Jannoo's Profile Photo

    Pictures not allowed inside the temple

    by Jannoo Written Mar 15, 2006

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    Favorite thing: The temple is a sacred place. Photos are allowed outside the temple only. Before entering you are warned about taking pictures. There is some local paroling the temple and if you caught, they will confiscate your camera

    Fondest memory: I've seen people caught for taking pictures inside. But few minutes later I saw them get back their camera :) Perhaps they deleted the pics from their digital cam

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  • draguza's Profile Photo

    Temple of Ramses II

    by draguza Updated Jan 16, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Temple facade

    Favorite thing: These rock-cut temples are located in the ancient Wawat (or the legendary Ybsambul) in Nubia, near the borders of Sudan, about 300 kilometers from Aswan. Earlier temples in Nubia had been located within forts, but here the confidence of Ramses II, whose reign may have lasted as many as 67 years, is illustrated; these temples, probably once brightly colored, were cut into the natural rock and lapped by the Nile. After eleven centuries of oblivion, these temples were rediscovered in 1813 when Johann Ludwig Burckhardt saw by accident the upper parts of the colossal figures. In 1817 Giovanni Battista Belzoni found the entrance, partially freed from the sand. In the following years these temples were often partially covered by shifting sands.

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  • CandS's Profile Photo

    Inside the temples

    by CandS Written Dec 31, 2005

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    Inside a temple

    Favorite thing: Inside the temples you will see plenty of paintings/etchings on the walls...they all look great and it's amazing how fresh and new they look for their age. We took this photo before we realised you weren't supposed to take photos so it's our only one. Apparently some people had their cameras taken away although we didn't luckily...

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