Temple of Abu Simbel Things to Do

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Most Recent Things to Do in Temple of Abu Simbel

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    The final glimpse.

    by K.Knight Written Oct 30, 2009

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    Adieu!
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    After 3 hours at the Temple site it is time to walk back to the shops at the entrance gate and meet your guide for the return bus trip.

    Just before you walk up the path at the opposite end from where you entered you will get a very impressive site of the two temples together. It is your final chance to marvel at this spectacular temple complex and take that final picture for the photo album…or V.T page.

    We had an excellent time here. Even though we arrived at 8am and departed at 11am it was still hot! When we arrived at 8 am it was 39 degrees Celsius and when we departed at 11 am it was 52 degrees Celsius! (Pack plenty of water.)

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    The key to the kingdom!

    by K.Knight Written Oct 30, 2009

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    Anne with the key to the tomb.

    At the entrance to the temple of Hathor there is a guard on duty that ensures that nobody is taking photos.

    He will offer for you to have a photo taken with him though!...for a fee of 5 Egyptian Pounds.

    Anne is seen here holding the key to this temple. Yes, it is a real key to the door of the Temple of Hathor.

    One thing you learn very quickly in Egypt is that “most” of the guards, guides and tourist police are open to bribery. In fact, it seems to part of their every day life. You can offer a bribe for most “access” or “photographic” issues and the worst that can happen is that you are met with a polite “no.”

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    The Temple of Hathor.

    by K.Knight Written Oct 30, 2009

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    The Temple of Hathor.
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    Ramses II loved himself more than no other; in fact, he built so many icons, temples, statues and relief’s of himself all over Egypt I was sick of looking at him by the time I left Egypt!

    One thing he did do, however, was build a magnificent temple for his favorite wife, Nefertari. (Even if it was a fraction of the size of his temple next door!)

    Of course, the reliefs and paintings inside are not of Nefertari, they are of Ramses II slaying his enemies while Nefertari watches on…how romantic.

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    The Hypostyle Hall

    by K.Knight Updated Oct 30, 2009

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    The Hypostyle Hall.

    As soon as you enter the Temple of Ramses II you actually enter the Great Hypostyle Hall. This hall has large statues of Ramses II, all standing 10 meters tall, with crook and Flail in his crossed arms.

    All of the statues on the left hand side of the hall are wearing the crown of Upper Egypt while all of the statues on the left hand side of the hall are wearing the crown of both Upper and Lower Egypt. The most amazing thing to me, though, were the murals that depict Ramses II making offerings to himself as a god! Gee this bloke loved himself!

    PLEASE REMEMBER THAT YOU CAN NOT TAKE PHOTOS INSIDE THE TEMPLE........UNLESS YOU BRIBE A GUARD OF COURSE!!!!!

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    The Vestibule.

    by K.Knight Updated Oct 30, 2009

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    The Impressive Vestibule.

    After you make your way through the Great Hypostyle Hall you will enter the Vestibule. This remarkable columned room has fascinating paintings, reliefs and hieroglyphics on the walls and square support columns. Most of these painings represent Ramses and Nefertari making offerings to Amun and Ra-Harakhty.

    At the end of the vestibule is a smaller room, the inner sanctuary, where Ramses is sitting with his gods.

    PLEASE REMEMBER THAT YOU CAN NOT TAKE PHOTOS INSIDE THE TEMPLE........UNLESS YOU BRIBE A GUARD OF COURSE!!!!!

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    The Inner Sanctuary.

    by K.Knight Updated Oct 30, 2009

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    Ramses II. sitting with his gods.

    As I mentioned earlier, at the end of the vestibule is a smaller room, the inner sanctuary, where Ramses is sitting with his gods. At this stage you have now walked 66 meters from the entrance and you are at the back of the great Temple of Ramses II.

    There are a number of storage rooms on either side of the hypostyle hall and Vestibule. These rooms were used to hold offerings and are completely empty. There are hieroglyphics adorning the walls but nothing worth noting to see.

    PLEASE REMEMBER THAT YOU CAN NOT TAKE PHOTOS INSIDE THE TEMPLE........UNLESS YOU BRIBE A GUARD OF COURSE!!!!!

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    The Temple of Ramses II.

    by K.Knight Updated Oct 30, 2009

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    The Temple of Ramses II.
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    Well folks, this is what we have come to see..The Temple of Ramses II.

    You walk from the car park, through a row of shops and eventually through the gate of the complex. A path leads you to the left of the hill and you will have an excellent view of Lake Nasser. (Pray that there are no ships berthed here as it will be crowded if there is! We were lucky as there were no ships when we visited.)

    The path then cuts to the right and as you reach the crest of the hill you are met with a very imposing view of the Temple of Ramses II with the Temple of Hathor in beside it. (The Temple of Hathor was dedicated to Ramses II’s wife, Nefertari. It is recorded that Nefertari was more beautiful than Nefertiti.)

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    Statue of the Falcon God Horus.

    by K.Knight Written Oct 30, 2009

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    The Falcon God Horus.

    Situated at the far left of the Temple you will see the granite statue of the falcon God Horus.

    The Falcon God Horus is said to have fought a fierce battle with his uncle Seth, who had cruelly murdered Horus’s father Osrisis. The body of Osrisis was spread all over Egypt.

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    The Colossi of Ramses II.

    by K.Knight Written Oct 30, 2009

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    Anne and I dwarfed by Ramses II.
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    The sheer size of the 4 seated statues of Ramses is impressive.

    The entrance to the Temple is situated in the middle of the 4 statues, with two on each side. A small statue of Ra- Harakhty is situated above the entry while a plethora of Baboons sit patiently on either side of the façade.

    An earthquake in 27 B.C saw the Pharaoh “lose his head” and Anne and I were dwarfed by the remains of his head, not to mention the sheer size of these statues.

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    The Temple of Ramses II - 2.

    by K.Knight Written Oct 29, 2009

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    The temple of ramses II.
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    The fascade of the Temple was carved out of solid rock into the cliff face of a mountain. Slaves were used to do the heavy work in the creation of this Temple in the 13th century B.C.

    The temple is dedicated to the Pharaoh Ramses II, although a small attempt was made to make it look as though the temple was actually dedicated to the great God Amun of Thebes. (Thebes is now known as Luxor and Karnak Temple, in Luxor, is dedicated to this same God.)

    As you can imagine, Ramses II is famed for having built many temples and statues all over Egypt in an attempt to glorify himself. In my opinion, this is the most spectacular of them all.

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    Get up Early!!!!

    by K.Knight Updated Oct 29, 2009

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    A whole lot of nothing.

    For an excellent adventure from Aswan, Anne and I would highly recommend the day trip to the Temple of Abu Simbel. At a cost of US$85 (in July 2009.) this day was very tiring but certainly worth every cent!

    You day will begin with a wake up call at 3.30am…yes, that is correct, 3.30am. You will have 30 minutes to shower, get dressed and grab a quick bite to eat and head to the foyer of the hotel for your 4am pick up.

    A representative from the tour company will greet you and take you out to your bus.

    REMEMBER, take -
    Plenty of water
    Snacks
    Hat
    Sunscreen
    Sunglasses
    camera
    Egyptian Pounds.

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    Travel the lonely highway.

    by K.Knight Written Oct 29, 2009

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    Sand hills a planty!
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    The bus will leave the motel a little after 4am and drive to the Southern edge of town, near the Philae Temple, to the marshalling are for all of the busses that will leave in a convoy for the Temple. (It is at this stage that I suggest you use the bathroom as there are no stops for the next 3 hours!)

    At 5am sharp all of the busses form a huge convoy, with police/army escort, and you are whisked the 300 kilometers from Aswan the most spectacularly beautiful, impressive and imposing structure in all of southern Egypt.

    Be warned, this 300 kilometer trip is filled with a lot of nothing! It is situated smack bang in the heart of Nubian Country and is very close to the border with Sudan. The endless highway is littered with sand dunes, mesas, Arabic road signs and a lot of sand!

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  • Aswan-Abu Simbel

    by Happy-Go-Lucky Written Aug 27, 2008

    Hi
    we did this last November, stayed in Aswan and booked a tour, it was fine, safe, no hassle and hotel packed us breakfast to take along. We went to Abu Simbel, Philae, High Dam and Unfinished Obilisque (actually, no-one went in to see that cos we were all worn out!)

    We stayed in a good budget hotel along the Corniche, booking through them was LE70 each (transport only) and we thought it good value for the money.

    We met someone who had gone by private taxi, sure it was agreed at LE60 per person.... then when they go to Abu Simbel... another LE60 each to return!

    It's a long day which ever way you do it, but well worth it.

    Hope this helps

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  • Abu Simbel Festival

    by karensuzjo Written Aug 7, 2008
    Residents celebrating Abu Simbel festival
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    Abu Simbel is wonderful on its own, but it's even nicer to see during the Abu Simbel festival. The website attached explains this festival. We were the first people in line to see it. If you plan to go, stay at a nearby hotel. The nearest hotel is The Nefertari Hotel. You can walk to the monument. Next to the temple for Ramses is the temple for Nefertari. There is a beautiful view of Lake Nasser opposite the temples.

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    Views over Lake Nasser

    by MM212 Updated Apr 3, 2008

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    Lake Nasser
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    Abu Simbel offers breathtaking views over Lake Nasser. The world's largest man-made lake was created with the completion of the High Dam in 1972. It was formed along the valley of the Nile in the southernmost part of Egypt and northern Sudan, and has enabled Egypt to regulate the unpredictable flow of the river and provided it with a large resevoir of water which can be distributed all over the country. Unfortunately, in its creation, a large area was inundated along with Nubian villages and many Ancient Egyptian temples. The villages and their inhabitants have been resettled, while most of the ancient ruins were moved - with international cooperation - to various areas around the region. Abu Simbel is one such site, and the most important. Several cruise ships sail down the large lake and visit these ancient temples and Abu Simbel is typically that last stop before returning north.

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