Temple of Horus Things to Do

  • Crowds leaving the Edfu Temple.
    Crowds leaving the Edfu Temple.
    by K.Knight
  • The 36 meter tall Grand Pylons.
    The 36 meter tall Grand Pylons.
    by K.Knight
  • Looking toward the first Hypostyle.
    Looking toward the first Hypostyle.
    by K.Knight

Most Recent Things to Do in Temple of Horus

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    Reliefs of the outer Temple - 2.

    by K.Knight Written Oct 30, 2009

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    Pharaoh being attended to by two concubines.
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    In this relief you can see the Pharaoh wearing the crown of both Upper and Lower Egypt. He is being attended to by two concubines. Each concubine is wearing a crown, one the crown of Upper Egypt while the other wears the crown of Lower Egypt.

    I was fascinated by the detail, especially the geese that are worn as a head dress as well as tight ceremonial skirts and plaited hair.

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    The Falcon God Horus

    by K.Knight Updated Oct 30, 2009

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    The granite statue of the Falcon God Horus.

    Wearing the crown of Upper and Lower Egypt, this magnificent granite statue of the Falcon God Horus is located just outside the first hypostyle Hall.

    The myth is that Osrisis was a King who is best known for teaching the Egyptians how to live
    and more importantly, how to grow corn. In fact, he is said to have told all Egyptians to worship corn. Horus’s Uncle Seth murdered his brother and cut the body up, scattering his body parts all over Egypt. Osrisis’s wife, Isis, collected all of the body parts and put them all back together forming the very first mummy in Egypt. Isis the used her magic to bring the mummy back to life and they conceived a son, Horus.

    Osrisis then joined the underworld and became judge of the dead while Horus went on to avenge his father by fighting the fierce battle with Seth.

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    Reliefs of the outer Temple.

    by K.Knight Written Oct 30, 2009

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    Horus, the Falcon Headed God, fighting.
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    Anne and I were very impressed with Edfu Temple which is home to the most beautiful “reliefs” and hieroglyphics depicting daily life. These hieroglyphics are carved into masonry that appears as though it could have been laid only a few years ago!

    In this relief you can see mythological scenes of Horus, the Falcon Headed God, fighting a hippopotamus and slaying it to prove his superior being. The hippos were also thought of as gods.

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    The Hypostyle Court.

    by K.Knight Updated Oct 30, 2009

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    The hypostyle court of Edfu Temple.

    The ceiling of the Hypostyle Hall, or “outer Hypostyle Hall” is blackened from the smoke of torches and fires. This is due to the Christians using the temple as a church after it was unearthed by the Romans. The Christians also took a chisel to the faces of just about every statue and relief in an effort to erase them from history,

    The Hypostyle Hall has 12 columns that support the roof and the walls are adorned with many hieroglyphics and reliefs that depict rituals, offerings and daily life as it was in the land of the Pharaohs over 2000 years before.

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    Enter the Grand Courtyard.

    by K.Knight Updated Oct 30, 2009

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    Looking toward the first Hypostyle.
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    During the reign of the Pharaohs, this court was a public gathering place to make offerings to the Falcon God Horus. It makes perfect sense then that this courtyard is named the “Court of Offerings!

    The court is colonnaded and each column has a papyrus lotus on top which support the roof of the first Hypostyle court.

    Anne and I did not spend a great deal of time in this court as the temperature was 45 degrees celsius and we wanted to reach the cool and comfortable shade in the Hypostyle Court,

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    Enter via the Grand Pylons

    by K.Knight Updated Oct 30, 2009

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    Crowds leaving the Edfu Temple.
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    The temple is known as the best preserved in all of Egypt because it was buried below meters of sand and silt for almost two thousand years! The temple dates back to approx 237 B.C, took 25 years to build and was commissioned by the Pharaoh Ptolemy III.

    The huge pylons in the forecourt of the temple are something special to look at. Anne and wondered around the forecourt and took in the "atmosphere" that seemed ever present at this temple. We stood in the shade of the walls that surround this structure and we waited a few minutes for the crowd of people to disperse before we eneted the temple. This way we had most of the place to ourselves while evryone else rushed to the rear of the temple to see the sanctuary.

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    The reliefs of the Grand Pylons.

    by K.Knight Updated Oct 30, 2009

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    Reliefs on the Grand Pylon.
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    The reliefs of the Grand Pylons depict scenes of the Pharaoh Ptolemy III defeating the enemies of Egypt while Horus and Hathor watch him eagerly.

    The entrance to the temple, and its colonnaded court is between the two grand Pylons and there are two statues of the Falcon God Horus guarding either side of the entrance to the court.

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    The Sanctuary of Horus.

    by K.Knight Written Oct 30, 2009

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    The sacred barque of the Falcon God Horus.
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    Now this is impressive! At the very end of the temple is the sanctuary of Horus.

    In the centre of the magnificent room is a model of the sacred barque of the Falcon God Horus. This model is situated in front of a black granite shrine to Horus and both are surrounded by three walls with the most exquisite reliefs depicting offerings to the god.

    It is a real shame that the Christians took a chisel to this place and defaced all of the reliefs in an effort to wipe out their beliefs.

    Be prepared for a bit of a wait as just about every visitor to this temple wishes to take a photograph or two of this magnificent room….me included!

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    The Mammisi.

    by K.Knight Updated Oct 30, 2009

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    The Mammisi.

    Known as the “House of divine birth,” the Mammisi is located just inside the entrance gate to Edfu Temple.

    The temple is dedicated to the Falcon God Horus’s birth in the presence of Hathor and Khenoum.

    I did not enter the Mammisi as it was undergoing renovations when I was there.

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    Sanctuary and Naos

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Aug 17, 2007

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    Edfu - Horus Temple's Sanctuary and Naos
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    The Sanctuary is situated at the end of the Temple. It includes a niche of gray granite where the statue of the god is supposed to be placed.

    There is a granite Naos here dedicated by Nectanebo II, making it the oldest relic in the Temple. It is probable that a golden gilded wooden statue of Horus about 60 cm tall would have resided on the Naos. This statue would have been cared for by the priests in a human manner, being washed, dressed, anointed, fed and entertained.

    You can see a pedestal in front of the Naos for the resting of the divine boat.

    You may see the Temple Sanctuary on my Edfu Temple Sanctuary 0.45 minute VIDEO CLIP with Tabocca Mediali Micro Song music.

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    Story of Horus Wall

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Aug 17, 2007

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    Edfu - Temple of Horus - Story of Horus Wall
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    In the Osiris legends, Horus was the child of Isis and Osiris. Horus was killed by his uncle Seth, as was his father, Osiris. In the picture above, the three gods are show with the Pharaoh. In earlier documents Horus is sometimes called the brother or Seth.

    However, in legend, Horus joined his father in the underworld and with the help of Isis returned to fight and defeat Set at Edfu. He fought in his corporal form that was resurrected from the Duat and in the form of a winged sun disc.

    At the Temple of Horus at Edfu the cult statues show the discoloration of the many hands that have touched them.
    In historical Egypt, as the King was always identified with Osirus, the Prince who was to succeed him was called "Horus in the Nest".

    You may see the Temple Story of Horus Wall on my Edfu Temple Story of Horus Wall 3.26 minute VIDEO CLIP with Anchor Mejans Mark Surrency (from the Cloud Selection) music.

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    Second Hypostyle Hall

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Aug 17, 2007

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    Edfu - Temple of Horus - Second Hypostyle Hall
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    The second - smaller Hypostyle Hall is situated beyond the Great Hypostyle Hall.
    Its roof is supported by 12 columns. It leads to a well called the Chamber of the Nile where the Priests obtained pure holy water.

    There are 2 rooms to the right and the left sides. One room was used as a library that once contained a large number of manuscripts. The other room was used as a storeroom or magazine for the utensils and the tools of the temple.

    You may see the Temple of Horus Second Hypostile Hall on my Edfu Temple of Horus Second Hypostile Hall 0.45 minute VIDEO CLIP with MJay Backwards Classicalism music.

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    First Hypostyle Hall

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Aug 17, 2007

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    Edfu - Temple of Horus - First Hypostyle Hall
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    The Hypostyle Hall represents the rectangular hall with roof, which is supported by 12 columns. On both sides of the entrance of the Hypostyle hall stands a statue of Horus of Behdet, which takes the shape of a falcon, also this hall is known as the outer Hypostyle Hall.

    The facade of the first hypostyle hall has images honoring Horus and Hathor. As you enter the Great Hall, you will notice the use of light. Even though the temple was build over hundreds of years, it is very harmonious, and ebbs and flow of lighting was certainly purposeful, portraying a feeling of mystery. There are two small rooms just inside the hall, a robbing room on the west and a library to the east where the priest would obtain the religious orders of the day. You may see scenes within this Hall offering the temple foundation ceremonies.

    You may see the Temple of Horus Main Hypostile Hall on my Edfu Temple of Horus Main Hypostile Hall 2.00 minute VIDEO CLIP with MJay Backwards Classicalism music.

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    Courtyard

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Aug 17, 2007

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    Edfy - Temple of Horus - Courtyard
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    The open Courtyard contains columns with floral capitals on three sides. This open court was open to the public and it was known as the court of the offerings. It is where people can give their offering to the statue of the God.

    Within the Pylons there is the colonnaded courtyard with distinctive, pared columns, which leads into the Great Hypostyle Hall. But on either side of the courtyard there are gates, which lead to an area behind the Temple and inside the bounding walls.

    You may see the Temple of Horus Courtyard on my Edfu Temple of Horus Courtyard 1.30 minute VIDEO CLIP 1 and on my Edfu Temple of Horus Courtyard 1.20 minute VIDEO CLIP 2 with Francesco Stablum Backtrace music.

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    Grand Pylons

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Aug 17, 2007

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    Edfu - Grand Pylons
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    Visitors approach the Temple from the side. They watch the Mammisi first and then… You should be sure to walk out a good distance in front of the First Pylon to fully enjoy the experience of approaching this building!

    Pylons are considered the highest among surviving temples in Egypt today. The Grand Pylons are some 63 m (205 ft) across and 37 m (118 ft) high.
    They are decorated with battle scenes representing King Ptolemy VIII smiting his enemies before God Horus.

    You may see the Temple of Horus Main Pylon on my Edfu Temple of Horus Main Pylon 1.04 minute VIDEO CLIP with Francesco Stablum Backtrace music.

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