Al Karnak Favorites

  • An image ERASED for eternity in Al Karnak, Egypt
    An image ERASED for eternity in Al...
    by jumpingnorman
  • Karnak Temple ticket
    Karnak Temple ticket
    by Kuznetsov_Sergey
  • Me in the Temple
    Me in the Temple
    by draguza

Most Recent Favorites in Al Karnak

  • jumpingnorman's Profile Photo

    If you are lucky, you might see a JACKAL!

    by jumpingnorman Updated Feb 19, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    In the middle of picture, a JACKAL in El Karnak

    Fondest memory: AL Karnak Temple ---- We were on our way out of the Chapel of Sekhmet, the lioness goddess, which at the time was closed and under renovation but my guide bribed the caretaker so we got in --- when all of a sudden, a jackal appeared!

    There were no tourists around and so maybe the jackal found that opportunity to snoop around! If you look closely in the middle of the picture, I did get a shot of him leaving. My guide says he never saw one there and that was arare thing to happen.

    So, just keep your eyes open for some animals , specially when there's not too many tourists around. That's when they come out.

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  • jumpingnorman's Profile Photo

    You will see some images DEFACED permanently!

    by jumpingnorman Updated Feb 19, 2009

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    An image ERASED for eternity in Al Karnak, Egypt

    Fondest memory: The Egyptians believe that the preservation of a person's name and his image guarantees immortality and life beyond death.

    However, when you had some enemies left behind, they might cause trouble by erasing your name and defacing your images....

    I remembered this ancient custom as I was looking throught my pictures and saw this picture and I wondered why I took it -- and if you look closely, the image was meticulously removed, eradicated, erased, caput! I think it might have been the image of hatsepshut who was so hated by her stepson.

    So, watch out for these defacements --- there's a lot of them at Al Karnak.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    What Time to Visit Al Karnak

    by MM212 Updated Mar 12, 2008

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The best time to visit al Karnak temples is during lunchtime, between 12 noon and 2pm. Organised tour operators allocate this time to feed the hords of tourists and therefore crowds tend to be relatively small at Karnak. Plan to have an early or a late lunch that day and visit the temple lunchtime. It is what I did and found the crowds to be manageable.

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    The Karnak Temples

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jun 20, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Karnak Temple ticket

    Favorite thing: The Karnak Temples are open from 6:30 am until 5:30 pm in winter and from 6 am to 6 pm during summer.

    Admission is LE 50 for foreigners, LE 20 for foreign students, LE 4 for Egyptians and LE 2 for Egyptian students. Visiting the open-air museum, to the left of the second pylon, costs an extra LE 20. The museum contains a collection of statuary that was found throughout the temple complex. The ticket has to be purchased at the main Karnak ticket kiosk.

    Karnak takes at least a half of a day just to walk around its many precincts and years to come to know it well.

    Fondest memory: You may get more information about the Karnak Temple in the article "Karnak in Thebes" by Jimmy Dunn here. I've taken the names if sights in english transcription and several explanations from this article. Thanks, Jimmy!

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits

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  • miman's Profile Photo

    Thutmose III & Hatshepsut's obelisks

    by miman Written Aug 1, 2006
    Obelisk - Karnak Temple

    Favorite thing: In a narrow court, there are several obelisks, one which dates from Thutmose I, and is 21.2m high and weighs nearly 150 tons. Just beyond this is the remaining obelisk of Hatshepsut, nearly 30m in height. Later kings blocked out the view of this from ground level, and constructed walls around it. The companion to this lies broken, by the sacred lake.

    Fondest memory: Obelisks were a prominent part of the architecture of the ancient Egyptians, who placed them in pairs at the entrance of temples. Twenty-seven ancient Egyptian obelisks are known to have survived, plus one incomplete obelisk found partly hewn from its quarry at Aswan.

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  • miman's Profile Photo

    Karnak Temple - Great Hypostyle Hal

    by miman Written Aug 1, 2006

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Karnak Temple

    Favorite thing: The Great Hypostyle Hall of Karnak, located within the Karnak temple complex, in the Precinct of Amon-Re, is one of the most visited monuments of Ancient Egypt. The hall covers an area of 50,000 sq.ft. The roof, now fallen, was supported by 134 columns in 16 rows, the 2 middle rows are higher than the others (being 33 feet in circumference and 80 feet high). The hall was probably begun by Horemheb, but was completed in the early 19th Dynasty by Ramesses I, was then worked on by his son Seti I, and completed by his son, Ramesses II (although Ramesses III, Ramesses IV and Ramesses VI all added their names to walls). The north side of the hall is decorated in raised relief, and was mainly Seti I's work. The southern side of the hall was completed by Ramesses II, in sunk relief. The outer walls depict scenes of battle, Seti I on the north and Ramesses II on the south. These scenes may not show actual combat, but could have a ritual purpose. The southern walls of Ramesses II have scenes that record details of the peace treaty signed between him and the Hittites in the year 21 of Ramesses' reign.

    Fondest memory: Column in the Great Hypostyle Hall.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Archeology

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  • miman's Profile Photo

    Karnak Temple

    by miman Written Aug 1, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Karnak Temple

    Favorite thing: Karnak Temple is the leading attraction in al-Karnak. Essentially this is al-Karnak. The very term Karnak is nearly universally understood as the temple complex and not the village. It is twice the size of the built-up village area. It is a vast open-air museum and the largest ancient religious site in the world. It consists of four main parts, of which only one is accessible for tourists and the general public. This is also the "main" temple part and by far the largest part. One can probably on that basis redefine the term Karnak, as to be understood as being the Precinct of Amon-Re only, as this is the only part most visitors normally see. The three other parts are closed to the public.There are also a few smaller temples and sanctuaries located outside the enclosing walls of the four main parts, as well as several avenues of ram-headed sphinxes connecting the Precinct of Mut, the Precinct of Amon-Re and Luxor Temple.The key difference between Karnak and most of the other temples and sites in Egypt is the length of time over which it was developed and used. Construction work began in the 16th century BC. Approximately 30 pharaohs contributed to the buildings, enabling it to reach a size, complexity and diversity not seen elsewhere. Few of the individual features of Karnak are unique, but the size and number of features is overwhelming.

    Fondest memory: Precinct of Amon-Re
    This is the largest of the precincts of the temple complex, and is dedicated to Amun-Re, the chief god of the Theban Triad. Construction of temples started in the Middle Kingdom, and continued through to Ptolemaic times. The site occupies roughly 250 000 m² and is so large, and contains so many structures and monuments, that it is advisable to obtain some information before visiting the site, in order not to be overwhelmed and exhausted by its size and complexity. Originally the quay led via a corridor of Sphinxes to the entrance to the second pylon, but these were moved aside when the First Pylon was constructed.

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  • draguza's Profile Photo

    Temple of Amon

    by draguza Written Jan 20, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Me in the Temple
    1 more image

    Favorite thing: Egyptian cult temples like those at Karnak and Luxor were dedicated to gods who were served there by the pharaoh and his priests. In return, the gods gave life and order to the land of Egypt. The pharaoh of ancient Egypt was more than a head of state, he was looked upon as a divine link between the gods and his people.

    Fondest memory: An entrance pylon of massive, twin towers was fronted by obelisks and statues. This led to an open peristyle court beyond which was a columned hypostyle hall. Finally came dimly lit chambers that included the holy inner sanctum that was dedicated to the temple god and accessible only to the pharaoh and priests.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Historical Travel

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  • Luchonda's Profile Photo

    Karnak, the hugest temple in Luxor

    by Luchonda Updated May 23, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The avenue of Sphinxes

    Favorite thing: The avenue of the Sphinx connected in the past the two existing temples. Luxor and Karnak.
    It was a yearly tradition that this avenue was scénary of a religious procession.
    The three golden boats were highlights at the procession. Next to the noble people and the highpriests, the locals brought many offers.

    Fondest memory: Karnak is the biggest historical temple in Luxor. So many Pharaos of different Egypt Dynasties builded and rebuilded this temple.
    So you will find many different styles of architecture

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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  • saraheg77's Profile Photo

    Say Hi to the Welcome Goats!

    by saraheg77 Written Jun 8, 2004

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Welcome Goat

    Favorite thing: We saw this little guy proudly standing on one of the benches that line the pathway leading up to the entrance to the Karnak Temple. My mom asked if he was real or a statue... he was a live goat... he just didn't seem to mind posing for me to take a picture with him. He had another friend with him and later we saw them wandering around inside the temple.

    Be sure to stop and take a picture with the goat or maybe try to get one as a tour guide. They seemed to know their way around the place well and didn't ask for tips =)

    Fondest memory: Also, remember the nice shady benches in case you get too hot or tired while inside the temple... come back out to the benches for a nice rest in the shade... unless, of course, they are all occupied by goats =)

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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  • aliante1981's Profile Photo

    Advice: Currency

    by aliante1981 Written Feb 18, 2004

    Favorite thing: If you have no plastic card (either a debit, or a credit one) and do not wish to be bothered with travelers cheques (where commission charges tend to be quite high) you will be better off taking with you determinate currency.

    At present, these currencies are clearly Euros (#1, offering the best exchange rate) and US Dollars (as widely accepted but somewhat marked down by the Exchange Bureaus & banks due to the recent slide).

    Some other currencies are accepted, but they are heavily marked down.

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  • kenmerk's Profile Photo

    Safety First....

    by kenmerk Written Jan 15, 2004

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Local SWAT team outside Karnak....

    Favorite thing: As it is in most of the places on the tourist circuit in Egypt, its safety first at the Karnak Temple near Luxor.

    Here an armored anti-terrorist vehicle stands guard outside the main gate of the temple. When you visit Egypt you will see these kinds of measures in place quite often......

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  • kenmerk's Profile Photo

    Liberated Feet

    by kenmerk Written Jan 3, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Severed Feet....

    Favorite thing: A pair of liberated feet, with no attaching body that you can find at Karnak.

    I dont know what tragic event or illness may have caused this condition, but one can only speculate that if only the miracles of modern podiatry (as administered by FOotfetish and her beer guzzling Aussie mates) had been available to the ancient Egyptians, this sort of event could likely have been avoided...

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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  • aliante1981's Profile Photo

    A group of tourists in the temple

    by aliante1981 Written Sep 6, 2002

    Fondest memory: A group of adult foreign tourists (yes, that was us:))) and not only!) going in circles (7 times, ladies and gents!) around the sacred scarab to get all our wishes fulfilled.

    If that is not your ambition, you could choose a smaller number of circles (for marriage and divorce).

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