Related Luxor Favorites Tips

  • the first Pylon of the Temple Complex
    the first Pylon of the Temple Complex
    by croisbeauty
  • Karnak
    by croisbeauty
  • Karnak
    by croisbeauty

Most Viewed Favorites in Luxor

  • sbkluvs2travel's Profile Photo

    Very Impressive but sad.

    by sbkluvs2travel Written Aug 25, 2013

    Favorite thing: Seeing it in person was so different from all I had imagined. Unbelieveable sights and very nice people. Just so disappointed in the luxury and then around the corner the vast amount of poor areas with people just milling around and doing nothing to help themselves from what we saw. Felt so sorry for all the children that are sent to beg for food and survival. Would have loved to take so many of them home with us. Very happy to have been there and also see the many other superb sites from our ancient past. We had a GREAT guide.

    Was this review helpful?

  • goutammitra's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    Shop & Streets of Luxor

    by goutammitra Updated Dec 10, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Contrary to our belief, we found Luxor non touristy destinations extremely clean and courteous. The shops were open at 2.00PM and roads were full of people despite heat and it was also being cleaned during hot period between 12.00 noon to 4.00PM.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • goutammitra's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    Luxor Railway Station

    by goutammitra Written Dec 8, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: We were amazaed by the cleanliness and efficiency of Luxor Railway station. Though, it is a small station with very few trains and few passengers, we found the sation is extremely clean and very efficient. Since, Luxor is a touristy destination, they have decorated the station with beautiful murals and have painted them well contrary to our Indian Railway station, which is always filthy and over crowded.

    It was a beautiful welcoming change from our normal rouine.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • goutammitra's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    Girl Education in Egypt.

    by goutammitra Written Dec 8, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: It is presumed in outside world that in Islamic countries, girl child are not given modern education. But Egypt has gone far away in terms of education to the girl child. In many of the cities we noticed girls are going to school and collages. We also spoke to a few working girls who spoke good English and are fully aware of wht is hapening in the world.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • goutammitra's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    Green Luxor & Farming a way of life!

    by goutammitra Updated Dec 8, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: God has been very kind on Egypt by giving them the river Nile. They have benefitted for the generation since, human kind is active. It provided the the real life and civilization. Now in modern days the fertile Nile soil has turned the desert in to an Oasis in all respect.

    We found the vegetables, fruits are being grown in many parts of the city as well apart from both the banks of the Nile river. It really shows how hard working people of Egypt are, they are exploring every opportunity to turn their city as Green!

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Desert
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • goutammitra's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    Alabaster Factory & Craftsmen

    by goutammitra Updated Nov 30, 2010

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: These wonderful craftsmen are responsible for creating life in the stones. They work relentlessly for hours to create the magic in the stones. In the Alabaster Factory, they showed us the process to make beautiful articles from raw Alabaster chunks taken from the nearby mines. How they cut it, heat up, then carve the stone to give it a shape to make it an item for the showroom.

    This process is going on for centuries, generation after generation.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Contact a Local Tour Operator

    by travellingbetty9 Written Jun 11, 2010

    Favorite thing: I was tasked to plan our vacation to Egypt and I scoured the internet for tours at Luxor and Cairo. I was lucky to contact a local tour operator for our tour at Luxor, couple Mohamed and Jann at www.reallifeegypt.com. They suggested the attractions to see and were readily flexible to adapt to our requests and budget unlike other tour operators whose prices were already fixed and higher for the same attractions. We were fortunate to be given a knowledgable guide who even accompanied us and bargained for us for souvenirs to bring home.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • stewarth99's Profile Photo
    1 more image

    English speaking guides

    by stewarth99 Updated Sep 11, 2008

    Favorite thing: We have stayed in Luxor (west bank) several times and found that ALI, who runs the Africa Restaurant close to the ferry, is always knowledgable and helpful. He also has a taxi and is an authorised guide. His international telephone number is 0020123658722.
    Have fun and give him my love.
    Stewart

    Fondest memory: The people are so friendly and helpful

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Desert
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    1 Luxor General Overview

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Sep 7, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Luxor is situated in 670 km to the south from Cairo and 70 km to the South from Qina (Qena). It has about 100 thousand inhabitants.

    Luxor is located on the right bank of the Nile. Nowadays silent and small town it was referred as Thebes in days of the New Empire and it is considered that it was the capital of Egypt.

    Numerous architectural monuments of Luxor are entered into the List of the world cultural heritage of UNESCO. Because of the historical value and wide popularity among tourists Luxor is allocated in an independent administrative unit.

    Inhabited quarters last along the bank of the Nile.

    Fondest memory: You may watch my 2 min 31 sec VIDEO-Clip on my personal YouTube channel: Egypt Luxor Downtown and Temple in April, 2007

    Related to:
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Temple of Hatshepsut

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jul 20, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The West Bank of the Nile near Luxor or West Thebes is even more interesting in many aspects than the East Bank, which often has the name of East Thebes with its Karnak and Luxor Temples. Colossi of Memnon, Temple of Queen Hatshepsut, Valley of the Kings, Temple of Ramesses III (Medinet Habu), Village of Deir el-Medinah and others are the highlights of the West Thebes. They are the purls of the ancient Egypt history and culture.

    The mortuary temple of Hatshepsut of untraditional appearance which appears to be in harmony with the surrounding environment.
    The Temple nestles at the foot of the cliffs in a natural "bay" on the West Bank of Luxor. This area had long been sacred to the goddess Hathor. In the 7th century AD, it was named after a Coptic monastery in the area, known as the “Northern monastery”. There is a theory suggesting that the Temple, in the Early Christian Period, was used as a Coptic monastery.
    After the introduction of Christianity, Hatshepsut’s temple was used as a monastery. Its modern name Deir el-Bahri is Arabic for "Northern Monastery."
    The Temple served for her posthumous worship and to honor the glory of Amun and the other gods.
    The individual parts of the Temple of Hatshepsut correspond to the classical form of Theban mortuary temples with pylon, courts, hypostyle hall, sun court, chapel for the royal cult, and sanctuary.

    Admission price to the Temple of Hatshepsut is 25 LE ($5)
    Open hours from 6.00 till 18.00 (in April).
    Ticket kiosk is located 1 km to the North of Colossies on the cross of the road to the Nile and the road which is parallel to the Theban Hills.
    You can buy all types of tickets for sightseeing of Western Thebes in this kiosk.
    Colossies are free of charge.

    Vt has the separate location for the West bank of the Nile (Thebes). I've put my page here with 21 tips and 74 pics.

    Fondest memory: You may see more pics on my Travelogue

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Valley of the Kings

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jul 20, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The Valley of the Kings is hidden behind the Theban Hills on the West Bank of the Nile near Luxor. It was chosen as the burial place for most of Egypt's New Kingdom rulers for several reasons. The Valley is very close to the cultivated banks of the river and ancient Thebes. It is surrounded by steep cliffs. That is why it was easily guarded. The local limestone, cut millions of years ago by torrential rains to form the Valley, is good for making tombs.

    There are 62 numbered royal and private tombs in the Valley of the Kings. Some of them have a simple pit, like KV 54. Some of tombs are huge like KV 5 with over 121 chambers and corridors. Most were found already plundered. A few, like the tomb of Tutankhamen (KV 62) contained thousands of precious artefacts.

    The Necropolis of Thebes is really a highlight of Luxor.
    There are in fact two connected valleys, of which the eastern is the more important. A total of 62 tombs have been given an official number, and there are at least three unnumbered tombs. Not all the numbered tombs belong to kings, some of them were constructed for members of the royal family.

    Admission 70 LE ($13).
    This ticket allowers to visit three tombs at your choice.
    To visit Tutankhamun Tomb you should buy the separate ticket. It costs 100 LE ($19).
    Open hours: from 7.30 till 17.30 (in April).

    VT has the separate location for the Valley of Kings (Necropolis of Thebes). I put my own page here with 12 tips and 54 pics.

    Fondest memory: You may see more pics on my Travelogue

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Karnak Temple

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jul 20, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: A highlight of Luxor (ancient city of Thebes) is the Karnak Temple. It covers an immense more than 40 hectares. The main and the grandest place of worship is the Precinct of Amun. The Great Hypostyle Hall is 6000 sq m and filled with immense stone pillars. The whole site has colossal statues, reliefs, obelisks and halls and, of course, the Avenue of the Sphinxes.

    The Karnak Temples are open from 6:30 am until 5:30 pm in winter and from 6 am to 6 pm during summer.

    Admission is LE 50 for foreigners, LE 20 for foreign students, LE 4 for Egyptians and LE 2 for Egyptian students. Visiting the open-air museum, to the left of the second pylon, costs an extra LE 20. The museum contains a collection of statuary that was found throughout the temple complex. The ticket has to be purchased at the main Karnak ticket kiosk.

    Karnak takes at least a half of a day just to walk around its many precincts and years to come to know it well.

    VT has its separate location for Karnak Temple. I have my own Karnak Temple page with 22 tips and 114 pics.

    Fondest memory: You may see more pics on my Travelogue

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo
    4 more images

    The Nile at Luxor

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jul 20, 2007

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Everybody knows that the Nile is the greatest river of the world. Even if there wouldn’t any sights on its banks, and I wouldn’t see Pyramids and Temples, the cruise over the Nile would have a great sense for me.

    It is difficult to express the feeling covering you when, being on an upper deck, you understand, that the Great and Powerful Nile stretches in front of you. This feeling was one of the strongest among set of feelings which I have felt during my travel over Egypt.

    For the first time it has happened, as soon as our ship left the mooring in Luxor. I was in the cabin at this time and almost missed the miracle. Having seen a leaving bank through the window of the cabin, I have run out on to the upper deck and have felt the happiness which has captured me with an evening breeze. It was fine!

    The next three days I stayed on the upper deck many times before sunrises or during sunsets and admired the beauty of the Nile. I was admiring its wonder-working force, power and trying to understand reasons of appearing of the civilization on its banks.

    Fondest memory: You may see more pics on my Travelogue

    Related to:
    • Cruise

    Was this review helpful?

  • Beograd's Profile Photo

    Shoes

    by Beograd Updated Jan 29, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Unless you have feet like this, I suggest that you pay attention to your foot wear. It's dusty where ever you go on a location in Luxor, so it's best for you to wear sneakers or something similar... Make sure that your footweare is comfortable and practical!

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Safari
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • atufft's Profile Photo

    The Great Belzoni

    by atufft Written Jan 8, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: At the entrance to a tombs in Valley of the Kings and elsewhere in Luxor, posted signs report who was first to discover the tomb. Tourists making note of this will soon realize that the giant leader in such tomb discovery was the Great Giovanni Belzoni. Fascinated by this controversial tomb robber turned archeologist, I found and read the copywrite 2003 biography by Stanley Mayes, the cover of which is shown in the photo. Belzoni was at first a circus strongman, a giant who could carry many people on his shoulders, who had dreams of becoming an engineer. He had an interest in hydrolics, which at the time was primarily devoted to the methods of extracting water for irrigation purposes. When the Pasha, Muhammad Ali, invited him to Cairo, he waited for several years hoping to sell the Pasha on his invention. Meanwhile, he and his wife Sara (whose own biography as a woman adventurer would be worth reading) traveled south as far as Aswan. At that time, Napoleon's troops had only recently left, and although interest in the Egyptian ruins was surging, little was known about them. Belzoni was a careful observer and chronicled his discoveries, but perhaps more importantly he was a resourceful engineer capable of organizing whatever rag tag group of Arab workers he could assemble to remove huge quanitites of sand from the entrances of buried treasures, such as Abu Simbel. In conjunction with interested British diplomats in Cairo, Belzoni found a way to finance the effort to extract and deliver to England much of the loot now part of the British Museum's antiquity department. Having worked in house construction, I am all too familiar with the challenges of moving heavy objects without the aide of machine, and yet Belzoni was able to figure out how to carefully move obelisks and other stone artwork weighing many tons, and then sail them down the Nile during the flood season.

    Fondest memory: Bear in mind that Belzoni did this in the early 19th century, before the advent of machinery made such lifting easy, but even today, the use of cranes to move these treasures is no easy task. Many of the images produced by Hollywood in movie sequels such as Indian Jones or Mummies become much more plausible after reading Mayes biography.Belzoni had a considerable knack for recognizing soil so disturbed as to suggest an entrance to a buried tomb. Competitors frequently became frustrated by Belzoni's secretive ability to organize laboar and continue work despite their efforts to foil him. Once Arab workmen cleared a small opening, with a torch light he would squeeze his huge frame into cramped quarters where he would find himself surrounded by spiders and decayed mummies. For a long time, he and Sara lived in a tomb in Luxor to beat the horrid summer heat, since this was before even the electric fan. Unfortunately, Belzoni's methods are imprecise by standards of modern archeology, and so in a true sense he was merely a tomb robber finding riches to sell to European museums. Indeed, since Belzoni worked prior to the discovery of the Rosetta stone, he did not understand just how ancient the temples and tombs really were, and many of his theories about their creation were flat out wrong. Yet, Belzoni easily recognized the engineering genius and artistic talent that lay before his eyes, and he died an adventurer not a rich man. Prior to Belzoni's efforts, Egypt's ruins were forgotten or dismissed as unimportant pagan creations, and so Belzoni deserves credit for bringing to the attention of the world most of the great antiquities tourists find today in Luxor.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Archeology
    • Arts and Culture

    Was this review helpful?

Luxor Hotels

See all 57 Hotels in Luxor

Latest Luxor Hotel Reviews

Sofitel Winter Palace Luxor
418 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 5, 2014
Sofitel Karnak Luxor
1036 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 16, 2014
Maritim Jolie Ville Luxor Island Resort Luxor
1398 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 13, 2014
Pavillon Winter Luxor
297 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 16, 2014
Mercure Luxor
418 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 5, 2014
Sheraton Luxor Hotel
793 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 14, 2014
New Pola Hotel Luxor
75 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: May 14, 2013
Gaddis Hotel
201 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 11, 2014
Iberotel
517 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 13, 2014
Hilton Luxor Resort & Spa
495 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 17, 2014
Pyramisa Isis Hotel & Suites Luxor
520 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 6, 2014
Lotus Hotel
196 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Mar 3, 2014
Saint Joseph Hotel
235 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Feb 10, 2014
Domina Inn Luxor Emilio Hotel
81 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Apr 2, 2014
Little Garden Hotel
60 Reviews & Opinions
Latest: Mar 13, 2014

Instant Answers: Luxor

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

92 travelers online now

Comments

Luxor Favorites

Travel tips and advice posted by real travelers and Luxor locals.
Map of Luxor