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  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    Friendly Locals

    by sue_stone Written Feb 9, 2005

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    Favorite thing: The Egyptian people were so friendly.....ok, many of them were friendly because they wanted us to buy something from them, but that was ok with me.

    And they were so funny - always wanting to have a joke and a laugh.

    We were warned against taking photos of the locals without asking....but I just couldn't resist sneaking this one of the guard....but I think he may have seen me!! And his hand was on his gun......I moved away quickly!

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Valley of the Kings

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jul 20, 2007

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    Favorite thing: The Valley of the Kings is hidden behind the Theban Hills on the West Bank of the Nile near Luxor. It was chosen as the burial place for most of Egypt's New Kingdom rulers for several reasons. The Valley is very close to the cultivated banks of the river and ancient Thebes. It is surrounded by steep cliffs. That is why it was easily guarded. The local limestone, cut millions of years ago by torrential rains to form the Valley, is good for making tombs.

    There are 62 numbered royal and private tombs in the Valley of the Kings. Some of them have a simple pit, like KV 54. Some of tombs are huge like KV 5 with over 121 chambers and corridors. Most were found already plundered. A few, like the tomb of Tutankhamen (KV 62) contained thousands of precious artefacts.

    The Necropolis of Thebes is really a highlight of Luxor.
    There are in fact two connected valleys, of which the eastern is the more important. A total of 62 tombs have been given an official number, and there are at least three unnumbered tombs. Not all the numbered tombs belong to kings, some of them were constructed for members of the royal family.

    Admission 70 LE ($13).
    This ticket allowers to visit three tombs at your choice.
    To visit Tutankhamun Tomb you should buy the separate ticket. It costs 100 LE ($19).
    Open hours: from 7.30 till 17.30 (in April).

    VT has the separate location for the Valley of Kings (Necropolis of Thebes). I put my own page here with 12 tips and 54 pics.

    Fondest memory: You may see more pics on my Travelogue

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Temple of Hatshepsut

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jul 20, 2007

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    Favorite thing: The West Bank of the Nile near Luxor or West Thebes is even more interesting in many aspects than the East Bank, which often has the name of East Thebes with its Karnak and Luxor Temples. Colossi of Memnon, Temple of Queen Hatshepsut, Valley of the Kings, Temple of Ramesses III (Medinet Habu), Village of Deir el-Medinah and others are the highlights of the West Thebes. They are the purls of the ancient Egypt history and culture.

    The mortuary temple of Hatshepsut of untraditional appearance which appears to be in harmony with the surrounding environment.
    The Temple nestles at the foot of the cliffs in a natural "bay" on the West Bank of Luxor. This area had long been sacred to the goddess Hathor. In the 7th century AD, it was named after a Coptic monastery in the area, known as the “Northern monastery”. There is a theory suggesting that the Temple, in the Early Christian Period, was used as a Coptic monastery.
    After the introduction of Christianity, Hatshepsut’s temple was used as a monastery. Its modern name Deir el-Bahri is Arabic for "Northern Monastery."
    The Temple served for her posthumous worship and to honor the glory of Amun and the other gods.
    The individual parts of the Temple of Hatshepsut correspond to the classical form of Theban mortuary temples with pylon, courts, hypostyle hall, sun court, chapel for the royal cult, and sanctuary.

    Admission price to the Temple of Hatshepsut is 25 LE ($5)
    Open hours from 6.00 till 18.00 (in April).
    Ticket kiosk is located 1 km to the North of Colossies on the cross of the road to the Nile and the road which is parallel to the Theban Hills.
    You can buy all types of tickets for sightseeing of Western Thebes in this kiosk.
    Colossies are free of charge.

    Vt has the separate location for the West bank of the Nile (Thebes). I've put my page here with 21 tips and 74 pics.

    Fondest memory: You may see more pics on my Travelogue

    Related to:
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    • Architecture

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo
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    The Nile at Luxor

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jul 20, 2007

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    Favorite thing: Everybody knows that the Nile is the greatest river of the world. Even if there wouldn’t any sights on its banks, and I wouldn’t see Pyramids and Temples, the cruise over the Nile would have a great sense for me.

    It is difficult to express the feeling covering you when, being on an upper deck, you understand, that the Great and Powerful Nile stretches in front of you. This feeling was one of the strongest among set of feelings which I have felt during my travel over Egypt.

    For the first time it has happened, as soon as our ship left the mooring in Luxor. I was in the cabin at this time and almost missed the miracle. Having seen a leaving bank through the window of the cabin, I have run out on to the upper deck and have felt the happiness which has captured me with an evening breeze. It was fine!

    The next three days I stayed on the upper deck many times before sunrises or during sunsets and admired the beauty of the Nile. I was admiring its wonder-working force, power and trying to understand reasons of appearing of the civilization on its banks.

    Fondest memory: You may see more pics on my Travelogue

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Karnak Temple

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jul 20, 2007

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    Favorite thing: A highlight of Luxor (ancient city of Thebes) is the Karnak Temple. It covers an immense more than 40 hectares. The main and the grandest place of worship is the Precinct of Amun. The Great Hypostyle Hall is 6000 sq m and filled with immense stone pillars. The whole site has colossal statues, reliefs, obelisks and halls and, of course, the Avenue of the Sphinxes.

    The Karnak Temples are open from 6:30 am until 5:30 pm in winter and from 6 am to 6 pm during summer.

    Admission is LE 50 for foreigners, LE 20 for foreign students, LE 4 for Egyptians and LE 2 for Egyptian students. Visiting the open-air museum, to the left of the second pylon, costs an extra LE 20. The museum contains a collection of statuary that was found throughout the temple complex. The ticket has to be purchased at the main Karnak ticket kiosk.

    Karnak takes at least a half of a day just to walk around its many precincts and years to come to know it well.

    VT has its separate location for Karnak Temple. I have my own Karnak Temple page with 22 tips and 114 pics.

    Fondest memory: You may see more pics on my Travelogue

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    1 Luxor General Overview

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Sep 7, 2007

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    Favorite thing: Luxor is situated in 670 km to the south from Cairo and 70 km to the South from Qina (Qena). It has about 100 thousand inhabitants.

    Luxor is located on the right bank of the Nile. Nowadays silent and small town it was referred as Thebes in days of the New Empire and it is considered that it was the capital of Egypt.

    Numerous architectural monuments of Luxor are entered into the List of the world cultural heritage of UNESCO. Because of the historical value and wide popularity among tourists Luxor is allocated in an independent administrative unit.

    Inhabited quarters last along the bank of the Nile.

    Fondest memory: You may watch my 2 min 31 sec VIDEO-Clip on my personal YouTube channel: Egypt Luxor Downtown and Temple in April, 2007

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  • kenmerk's Profile Photo

    Luxor Tots

    by kenmerk Written Jan 31, 2004

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    Favorite thing: Careful with the kids here in Luxor, I took a picture of this bunch, and tried to give them a Epyptian pound or two to buy some candy.

    Wrong move... As soon as they saw money they started going into a feeding frenzy, with a bunch of other kids jumping out all pushing and grabbing. Run away!!! Run away !!!!

    I actually aborted the attempt and made a strategic retreat. This was a much different experience then I had with kids in the "non-tourist" areas in Cairo, who couldn't be more friendly and helpful.

    So, I guess it is best to spend all you time in Luxor viewing monuments, and save the socializing for elsewhere....

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  • kenmerk's Profile Photo

    Only One Dollar!!!

    by kenmerk Written Jan 4, 2004

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    Favorite thing: You are likely to get this kind of sales approach in Luxor (and elsewhere)...

    "Mister, mister, felucca ride, only one dollar !!!"

    But if you inquire into actually taking the sailboat ride, they change the story to "one dollar to LOOK at the felucca boat, its five or ten bucks if you actually want to RIDE one... I saw this approach with t-shirt, trinkets, and most anything else that a tourist might want to buy...

    I know, they are just trying to make a living, but I probably would have bought/done more stuff if they were a little more straight forward...

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  • kenmerk's Profile Photo

    Room with a View

    by kenmerk Written Jan 4, 2004

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    Favorite thing: Upon checking into our Nile cruise ship for the 4 day journey from Luxor to Aswan, I opened the curtains to see what view the would provide...

    Feluccas sailing the blue nile ? Nope, sorry, not today.... its was another cruise ship docked just centimeters away.

    So rather than sitting back and watching the sail boats glide by, I guess I had to be content with watching the other boat's chef chop the vegetables....

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  • kenmerk's Profile Photo

    Sex Bomb....

    by kenmerk Updated Jan 6, 2004

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    Favorite thing: And staying in this type accomodation whilst visiting some of the greatest and oldest monuments known to man did seem to be quite the contradiction:

    By day walking in the shadow of Ramses the Great, by night swilling beers to the 70's polyester soaked music of Tom Jones and the Like...

    Sexbomb sexbomb you're a sexbomb
    You can give it to me when I need to come along!!!!!

    Sexbomb sexbomb,, you're my sexbomb
    And baby you can turn me on turn me on darlin'
    Sexbomb sexbomb you're my sexbomb sexbomb
    And baby you can turn me on un huuuuh!!!

    Well, I guess Tom is something of a mythical figure in his own right...

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  • kenmerk's Profile Photo

    Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas

    by kenmerk Written Jan 6, 2004

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    Favorite thing: I always seem to find myself is out of the way places on Christmas day. This year is was aboard a "Love Boat" type cruise ship docked in Luxor ready to set sail for Aswan.

    Last year was aboard the Welllington-Picton Ferry in New Zealand, and the year before was up in the heart of the Golden Triangle in Northern Burma drinking moonshine with some hill tribers...

    Suppose one day I'll settle down for the a more traditional Christmas ...

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  • geordiebutcher's Profile Photo

    Tutankhamun's Tomb and Photographs

    by geordiebutcher Updated Feb 15, 2005

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    Favorite thing: When you go to the valley of the kings, the most visited tomb is that of Tutankhamun (70 le) When you enter the tomb your camera is taken from you and you will be given a numbered disc. As you come out if there is not many people around, the guard will take a photograph of you climbing the steps and he will expect a tip so be prepared and have small notes in your pocket for all these unexpected costs. I was lucky I had a 10 le note so it cost me £1 for the photograph

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  • atufft's Profile Photo

    The Great Belzoni

    by atufft Written Jan 8, 2007

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    Favorite thing: At the entrance to a tombs in Valley of the Kings and elsewhere in Luxor, posted signs report who was first to discover the tomb. Tourists making note of this will soon realize that the giant leader in such tomb discovery was the Great Giovanni Belzoni. Fascinated by this controversial tomb robber turned archeologist, I found and read the copywrite 2003 biography by Stanley Mayes, the cover of which is shown in the photo. Belzoni was at first a circus strongman, a giant who could carry many people on his shoulders, who had dreams of becoming an engineer. He had an interest in hydrolics, which at the time was primarily devoted to the methods of extracting water for irrigation purposes. When the Pasha, Muhammad Ali, invited him to Cairo, he waited for several years hoping to sell the Pasha on his invention. Meanwhile, he and his wife Sara (whose own biography as a woman adventurer would be worth reading) traveled south as far as Aswan. At that time, Napoleon's troops had only recently left, and although interest in the Egyptian ruins was surging, little was known about them. Belzoni was a careful observer and chronicled his discoveries, but perhaps more importantly he was a resourceful engineer capable of organizing whatever rag tag group of Arab workers he could assemble to remove huge quanitites of sand from the entrances of buried treasures, such as Abu Simbel. In conjunction with interested British diplomats in Cairo, Belzoni found a way to finance the effort to extract and deliver to England much of the loot now part of the British Museum's antiquity department. Having worked in house construction, I am all too familiar with the challenges of moving heavy objects without the aide of machine, and yet Belzoni was able to figure out how to carefully move obelisks and other stone artwork weighing many tons, and then sail them down the Nile during the flood season.

    Fondest memory: Bear in mind that Belzoni did this in the early 19th century, before the advent of machinery made such lifting easy, but even today, the use of cranes to move these treasures is no easy task. Many of the images produced by Hollywood in movie sequels such as Indian Jones or Mummies become much more plausible after reading Mayes biography.Belzoni had a considerable knack for recognizing soil so disturbed as to suggest an entrance to a buried tomb. Competitors frequently became frustrated by Belzoni's secretive ability to organize laboar and continue work despite their efforts to foil him. Once Arab workmen cleared a small opening, with a torch light he would squeeze his huge frame into cramped quarters where he would find himself surrounded by spiders and decayed mummies. For a long time, he and Sara lived in a tomb in Luxor to beat the horrid summer heat, since this was before even the electric fan. Unfortunately, Belzoni's methods are imprecise by standards of modern archeology, and so in a true sense he was merely a tomb robber finding riches to sell to European museums. Indeed, since Belzoni worked prior to the discovery of the Rosetta stone, he did not understand just how ancient the temples and tombs really were, and many of his theories about their creation were flat out wrong. Yet, Belzoni easily recognized the engineering genius and artistic talent that lay before his eyes, and he died an adventurer not a rich man. Prior to Belzoni's efforts, Egypt's ruins were forgotten or dismissed as unimportant pagan creations, and so Belzoni deserves credit for bringing to the attention of the world most of the great antiquities tourists find today in Luxor.

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  • ukirsari's Profile Photo

    burrrrrrrrrrrung manis!!!

    by ukirsari Written Apr 23, 2005

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    Fondest memory: visit the small city of luxor, especially along youssef-mariam street, brings me back to the reality; we’re live today after such a long journey to visit historical sites in luxor and thebes. weird to find several kids begging for baksheesh thing, tip from this and that [even we never ask anything!] and the most bored question, “madame, have you already married and how many camels that your hubby brings to your parents?” ohhhhhh, mon dieu!!!
    but, we had a payback with visiting gorgeous sites at luxor. and not all of them like that. friendly people still can be found. also this nice creature: cat. we love to call him "burung". actually, in my lingo, burung means bird. but this cat, we see him so nice, cool and friendly like a sweet bird and i also remember a cover from my fave rock band rush in their album "fly by night" with cat and wings put on there. so, we miss this burung cat from chez omar resto and cafe at luxor square. see you again someday, burung manis :)

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  • pmarshuk's Profile Photo

    Off the main road

    by pmarshuk Updated Jan 9, 2004

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    Favorite thing: Looking down the narrow sidestreets of Luxor brings back to you that many parts of Egypt are still almost third world. On the overland trip from Aswan to Luxor some of the villages we went thru seemed to have housing that looked almost about to fall down.

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