Unique Places in Luxor

  • Temple of Hathor
    Temple of Hathor
    by RavensWing
  • Paintings in the Crypt
    Paintings in the Crypt
    by RavensWing
  • Walking in the Crypt
    Walking in the Crypt
    by RavensWing

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Luxor

  • sayedaburas's Profile Photo

    Al-Deir Al-Bahary from the air

    by sayedaburas Updated Apr 14, 2005

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    Queen Hatshepsut ruled Egypt from1486 till 1468. She tried her best to be a stong Pharaoh. She even ordered the schulptors to add a beard to her stautes. And cut her temple in a uniqe style to adapt the slope of the hill.

    To have a full panorama zoom out from the sky, enjoy and explore.

    Hatshepsut temple from air
    Related to:
    • Hot Air Ballooning

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    Karnak and Luxor temple complex from air

    by sayedaburas Updated Feb 5, 2005

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    Luxor —the city— is the world's greatest open air museum.

    Ancient Greek poet Homer described it as "Thebes of the hundred gates". Luxor —the name— was derived from the Arabic word "al-qusoor" i.e. "the palaces".

    Take a better taste, and go little bit higher to explore more.

    About Cost? It is a bit less than one air ticket!

    Karnak Complexes
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  • Diana75's Profile Photo

    Egyptian Music on CD from Luxor Bazaar

    by Diana75 Written Nov 4, 2005

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    In Luxor's Bazaar I found a store that was selling CDs with Egyptian music.
    Our tour leader recommended me a compilation of the most famous Egyptian singer Hakim.
    I paid something like USD 5-6 for the CD.
    Now, back home, I must admit that it the perfect way to remember the days spent in Egypt.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Music

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  • MadKiwiBeast's Profile Photo

    On Yer Bike!

    by MadKiwiBeast Written Mar 10, 2004

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    Definitely get a bicycle for at least one day! You don't get hassled by all the horse drawn carriages and street-sellers and its all flat so you can travel a long way quickly and cheaply. It also gives you the opportunity to venture into the small villages surrounding Luxor. This is what we did and actually came across a little shop in one of the villages where we didn't have to haggle for our coke and chips etc and paid the real price!! Quite a relief after 2 weeks of arguing over the price of a loaf of bread (usually 3-5 times the correct price is what they'll try to sell it to you in Luxor). We met these young boys while riding around the back of Karnak temple and they gave us sugar cane in return for a pen. They also asked us for money (baksheesh) Please don't give the children money unless you feel you REALLY have to as they begin to see tourists as money for nothing and you just make the situation worse for those to follow after you.

    Luxor Lads
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    • Cycling
    • Budget Travel
    • Backpacking

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Canals along the Nile

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Jul 18, 2007

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    The valley of the Nile is crossed by numerous channels which take water from the river. Owing to this the width of the valley has several kilometers. Where channels are not present, the desert comes closely up to the river. Unfortunately, banks of channels are dirty enough.

    Canals along the Nile Canals along the Nile Canals along the Nile
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  • NilePrincess's Profile Photo

    Dendera Temple

    by NilePrincess Updated Oct 22, 2009

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    Dendera Temple is not that far off the beaten track, but many first time visitors to Egypt miss it. It is DEFINITELY worth a visit. It can be done as a very long day trip via the Lotus Boat or combined with the temple of Abydos and done by road.

    Will add more info...but in the interim, please enjoy the photos!

    Dendera Temple - Sheer Beauty! Dendera Temple Dendera Temple Dendera Temple - Queen Hathor Dendera Temple

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  • Shofja's Profile Photo

    Fishermen

    by Shofja Written Dec 23, 2003

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    When we had Felucca ride we saw how local fishermen are drawing toils.
    For me it was really surprising - i know that water of the River Nile is very impure, and think, that there isn't possible to get some fish :-) But i was wrong.... ;-)
    The view was really interesting!

    Fishermen

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  • Beograd's Profile Photo

    Guides

    by Beograd Updated Mar 9, 2005

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    But we shouldn't forget our guides! Yes, these two guys were our guides. The one on the right is Vladan, our tourist guide, and the one on the right is Ahmed, a local guy. Very nice and very young

    Why did I put this as a tip? Simply because people usualy don't have fun with their guides on travels, unless they are having a friend as a guide. So this is definitly an "Off the beatten path" tip by all means.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture
    • Architecture

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  • Tijavi's Profile Photo

    A colossal attraction no more

    by Tijavi Updated Sep 25, 2007

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    Said to be the larger than Karnak, the funerary complex of Amenhotep III had been reduced to two giant statues - officially called Colossi of Memnon - that stand forlorn near the entrance to the Valley of Kings. This is what most tourists first see on their way to visit the intricately-designed funerary complexes of the Theban pharaohs. Inundation of the Nile over hundreds of years had been the primary culprit behind the destruction of Amenhotep III's giant funerary complex.

    The monument, housed in white sandstone with gold throughout and floor covered with silver and doors with electrum, would have been a fitting tribute to one of the greatest Egyptian pharaohs. It was during Amenhotep III's reign that Egyptian culture and power reached its zenith. Among other achievements, it was him who built Luxor Temple.

    Over the centuries, hundreds of statues and other artifacts were not only destroyed by the flooding of the Nile. Some monuments were vandalized by other pharaohs, and some moved to the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. Many others had found their way to the British Museum and in Turin, etc.

    Sadly, only the two colossi remain of this once magnificent monument, and the whole place had been reduced to a minor tourist attraction whose only value is to provide tourists with a short photo op session on their way to the Valley of Kings.

    The faceless colossi of Memnon
    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Historical Travel

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  • Tijavi's Profile Photo

    Strolling down Al-Mahatta

    by Tijavi Updated Dec 29, 2007

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    OK, let's face it - Luxor is not a pleasant town to walk around with touts hassling you minute by minute, meter by meter. But that should not prevent you from enjoying the simple pleasures like gawking at the dolled up builidings along Al-Mahatta, the main road leading to the train station, and the station itself, which was in the finishing stages of being spruced up. It's a pretty cool area to walk around with lots of interesting stuff like:

    1) Colonial architecture which reveals a lot about Luxor's importance as one of Egypt's tourism centerpiece as early as the 1800s. The buildings have been given a new lease of life with fresh coat of paint and refurbishing. While the effect could be contrived and Disneyesque, one could take comfort in the fact that these were authentic colonial buildings - only spruced up.

    2) Lots of interesting merchandise displayed here from traditional spices to mobile phone accessories to funky summer wear (in picture here).

    3) Humor is something Al-Mahatta does not lack in - that is if you find this "naughty" moviehouse humorous (3rd picture). From the looks of it, it specializes in skin flicks like the one shown here - movie titled "Haram," which means "forbidden" in Arabic. I just have to take a photo of it to show to my Egyptian friends back home - who now all deny having seen the movie. Really now.

    4) At the end of this grand boulevard is Luxor's train station, which was in the final stages of sprucing up when I was there. The main hall is now adorned with beautiful reliefs and colorful stained glass - all nicely done. One thing hasn't changed, though - touts still lurk around waiting for their next prey. Oh well, welcome to Luxor.

    Authentic classical architecture Hot swimwear... ...hotter movies Inside Luxor's spruced up train station
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  • Tijavi's Profile Photo

    West Bank's simple pleasures

    by Tijavi Written Jun 11, 2007

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    Arguably, the west bank contains some of the highest concentration of ancient monuments in the world with the Valley of the Kings, Valley of the Queens, Hatshepsut's Temple, Ramesseum, and many others all situated here.

    After you've had your fill of tombs and monuments, why not enjoy west bank's "minor attractions?" The most striking feature of this more laid back area of Luxor is the sudden contrast in vegetation - from the green fields stretching a few kilometers from the riverbank, to the suddenly arid land where the tombs of ancient Egypt's great nobles lie - a very interesting study in contrast.

    I had a wonderful time snapping the picturesque wheat fields set against the brown arid mountains, locals going about their daily lives, canals flowing through an otherwise desert landscape, and of beautiful sunset. The place also provides a refuge, however fleeting, from the touts at the east bank.

    After these, reward yourself with a nice, relaxing meal and a cold beer at Africa Restaurant near the ferry terminal.

    Man enjoying sheesha (waterpipe) Lush fields against arid mountains Canals provide irrigation Sunset over West Bank Crossing the Nile to the West Bank
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  • geordiebutcher's Profile Photo

    The village of Sheikh Abd el-Qurna

    by geordiebutcher Updated Mar 13, 2005

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    The village of Sheikh Abd el-Qurna (or simply Qurna) is built on top of the tombs in the Valley of the Nobles. Most of these houses have been cleared and the people removed to a new village but some of the locals refuse to go. There is no water in the village so the locals have to fetch the water in carts drawn by donkeys. The locals are very friendly and they will show you which tombs you can visit. They also like to have their photographs taken and expect a fee so be warned!

    Sheikh Abd el-Qurna
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Colossi of Memnon

    by croisbeauty Updated Apr 18, 2012

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    Colossi are two massive stone statues of pharaoh Amenhotep III, standing in the Theban necropolis since 1350 B.C. The twin statues depicting Amenhotep III in a seated position, while two shorter figures carved alongside his legs are his wife Tiy and mother Mutemwiya.
    The statues are made from blocks of quartzite sandstone and both of them are seriously damaged during the centuries. The original function of the Colosi was to standguard at the entrance of Amenhotep's memorial temple (mortuary temple). The temple was built during the pharaoh lifetime where he was worshiped as a God on Earth. Very little remains today of Amenhotep's temple. It was largest and most opulent temple in Egypt.
    The statues are better known as Colossi of Memnon, and Memnon in ancient Egyptian means "Ruler of the Dawn".

    Colossi of Memnon

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    The Weekly Market

    by geordiebutcher Updated Feb 17, 2005

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    There is a weekly market, held every Wednesday on the west bank. It is not far from the local ferry pehaps a five minute taxi ride. If you have time it is well worth a visit as this is where the locals come to shop for their fruit and vegetables as well as clothes shoes ect. you can also buy your fresh chicken here (live) plus your lamb also live. You will get some excellent photographs here as the brightly coloured fruits contrast well with the black clothing of the women. We bought bananas here and although they did not look as attractive as they do in the supermarkets back home they were better tasting and so very cheap, only a few Egyptian le's for 2 kilos. There is always lots of children around and they always make for good photographs. When I was writing my notes I found the children wanted my pen so next time I go I will be taking a few BICs with me.

    The Weekly Market

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    The Temple of Deir El-Medina

    by geordiebutcher Updated Mar 1, 2005

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    This small temple was dedicated to the Goddess Hathor and Ma'at. It was built by Ptoemy IV. The temple was later used by the early christians, whose incribed crosses can be seen on the walls. If you want to visit this temple, you can get a taxi to the Valley of the artisans. Walk past the worker's village and you will find it about half way to the valley of the Nobles. It is no more than a fifteen minute walk. You will find the ground littered with shards of pottery some of which have rather nice pattens on them. The large hole in the ground is an ancient well.

    The godess Hathor in cow form
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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Luxor Off The Beaten Path

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