Colossi of Memnon, Luxor

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  • Colossi of Memnon
    Colossi of Memnon
    by RavensWing
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    by June.b
  • Colossi of Memnon
    by June.b
  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    Colossi of Memnon

    by sue_stone Written Feb 9, 2005

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    One of the statues - Colossi of Memnon

    The Colossi of Memnon are two giant statues on the west bank of Luxor. They are made from quartzose sandstone and stand about 23 metres tall.

    They were originally built to guard a temple, that no longer exists, and these days look quite magnificent standing alone by the side of the road. Each statue is seated and rests on a huge granite plinth.

    There are a few other remains at the site, including two headless sphinxes.

    You can't miss these huge statues, as they are on the main road, and it is easy to pull into the parking area for a quick look, and some photos of course!!

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    The Colossi of Memmon

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Dec 20, 2008

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    The Colossi of Memmon
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    These twin statues of Amenophis III, once adorned his funerary temple. The temple, however was salvaged for stones by Ramses II. The Colossi has been a tourist attraction since Roman times. It was believed in these times that the statues were of Memmon, a legendary Egyptian prince, who said to have fought at Troy hence the name which has stuck with the statues ever since.

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    Colossi of Memnon

    by Diana75 Updated Mar 2, 2006

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    Colossi of Memnon
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    Colossi of Memnon are two huge statues of Amenhotep III which were originally placed in front of the mortuary temple of the king.

    The temple was destroyed throughout the centuries, but it is said that it was built of white sandstone, gold and silver.

    The statues show Amenhotep seated on his throne with the two Nile gods of upper and lower Egypt uniting the two lands, at his sides.

    It is also interesting to know that on the right of each statue appears a small figure of Queen Tiye, wife of Amenhotep III and on the left Queen Mutemua, his mother.

    The Colossi are made of sandstone.

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  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    Don't make this the highlight of your trip!

    by ATXtraveler Written May 23, 2004

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    Colossi of Memnon

    Along our way back from Hatshetsup's Temple and the Valley of the Kings, we stopped along at what appeared to be a small rest stop. It was actually an area dedicated to the Colossi of Memnon.

    Ancient Egyptians called the southern of the two statues "Ruler of Rulers". Later travelers called them "Shammy and "Tammy", which may have been a corruption of the Arabic words for "left" and "right". Today they are known locally as "el-Colossat", or "es-Salamat".

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    Memnon status

    by rosegirl Written Dec 27, 2007

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    so sadly they are all what remained of a temple to commemorate the anniversary Pharaoh Amnanb third and one high up towards 19.20 meters was launched Greeks this name when cracks statue northern and knocked out two votes - Vcbhoh Balbtal grateful legend who was killed in the Trojan War and shouting nation Ayios goddess of dawn every morning crying, it was The tears dew.

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    The Colossi of Memnon

    by Myndo Updated Apr 14, 2006

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    Memnon Colossus

    Actually the name "Colossi of Memnon" is a mistake, but since the old greeks and romans already made that mistake, it was carried on until today.

    The two colossal statues (they used to be 21m high, now without crown they are "only" 19m), are portraying the King Amenophis II (reigning around 1400 v.Chr.) and were protecting his death temple that was soon destroyed after his death.
    The Greeks that visited the country only saw the two statues and believed they showed Memnon, the King of Afghanistan from the Trojan War.

    The two colossi became one of the earliest tourist attractions when -after an earthquake - the northern one of them began to make sounds in the morning.
    It was said to be the voice of Memnon greeting his mother, the godess of morning Eos.
    Actually it was rather the air that expanded in the stone when the first sunlight warmed it. But the effect was really amazing and many historicans (including Herodot) wrote about it.

    In the early 3rd century a.c. the roman Emperor Severus Septimus visited the statues also. He was very impressed and ordered the broken statues to be restored.
    -from that day on, the Colossus was silent.

    If you have the time, have a look at the lower part of the northern statue (the right one if you stand in front of it). There are some nice inscriptions there from old visitors.

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  • clairegeordio's Profile Photo

    Colossi of Memnon

    by clairegeordio Written Dec 18, 2004

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    Colossi of Memnon

    These two large statues (each 17 metres high) are all that remains of the largest Theban temple, the temple of Amenophis III. These statues became a popular sight, due to a strange phenomenon: one made like a groaning sound at dawn, which the ancient Greeks interpreted as a call from the hero Memnon, to his mother Dawn. The sound was really caused by the air warmed by the sun passing through a crack in the statue, and stopped once the monument was restored in the 2nd Century AD

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    Colossi

    by Jeca011 Written Jun 13, 2004

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    Colossi of Memnon

    Perhaps the most imposing monument on the West Bank at Luxor are the famous 'Colossi of Memnon'. These massive statues which once flanked the entrance to Amenhotep III's mortuary temple now stand virtually alone in a field at the side of the road to the valley of the kings. Unfortunately the condition of the statues is not good. This is mainly caused by the soft nature of the stone from which they are made, combined with ancient Earthquake damage. Rising groundwater levels may also pose a risk to the site.

    The Legend of Memnon

    The Memnon legend was attached to the northern (right one) of the two statues by the Greeks. A fissure ran through the statue and when the ancient stone was warmed by the early morning rays of th sun it was heard to give an eerie moan. The Ancient Greeks thought that the statue represented King Memnon, and the sound was him greeting his mother Eos.

    Unfortunately attempts were made to repair the statue by the Romans, and since this time the Colossi have been silent.

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    Colossi of Memnon

    by catkin Updated May 25, 2004

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    Colossi of Memnon

    These two giant statues of Amenhotep III are all that remains of a large mortuary temple at the side of the road on the west bank.
    Standing at 59feet and although damaged by earthquake, flood and the elements the colossi are an impressive sight surrounded by fields of sugar cane.
    The smaller figures carved at the feet of Amenhotep sre his wife Tiye and his mother Mutemuia.

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    The Collossi of Memnon

    by kenmerk Written Jan 4, 2004

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    One of the Colossi of Memnon...

    The colossi of Memnon are two hugh statues that sit on the west bank of the Nile near Luxor. They once guarded a large temple complex that was neaby...

    On a clear day, (and most every day is a clear day around here) makes a great photo op, with the lush green Nile valley in the foreground, and tombs visible up in the barren mountains in the background...

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    The Colossi of Memnon

    by Shofja Written Dec 3, 2003

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    The Colossi of Memnon

    The Colossi of Memnon are situated on the main road to the West Bank monument area.
    All tourist's groups have here stop for some minutes - so, you can take photos!

    These two gigantic statues (around 17m high) were cut from two massive granite blocks, brought from quarries near Cairo. And once they stood at the entrance gate of the mortuary temple of Amenhotep III. Nowadays almost nothing remains about this temple of Amenhotep III.
    Statues represents the pharaoh Amenhotep III (Dynasty XVIII).
    There are very interesting story - after an earthquake in 27 BC, part of the northern colossus collapsed and from then on each morning at sunrise, the statue produced a strange musical sound. Ancient :-) Greek and Roman tourists :-) came to hear this sound, and gave statue the name of "Memnon" - a Trojan hero, the son of Eos and Titan, who sang to his mother each morning at daybreak. It's a legend, but in reality the sun heating up the stone produced this strange sound.
    In the third century AD northern statue was repaired and the mysterious singing was never heard again.
    But as a result of the legend the statues of Amenhotep III became known as the Colossi of Memnon.

    There is no entrance charge or restrictions on photography.

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    Colossi of Memnon, last remains of a temple

    by sachara Written Aug 21, 2003

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    Colossi of Memnon

    The Colossi of Memnon at the westbank are the remains of the temple of the king Amenotis III, once the largest temple of Thebe. The temple is destroyed by the flooding of the Nile centuries ago.
    The Colossi of Memnon nowadays stand solitary as guardians for the necropolis at the edge of the desert.

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  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Colossi of Memnon, solitary guards

    by sachara Written Aug 21, 2003

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    Collosi of Memnon

    When you cross the Nile to the westbank, the Colossi of Memnon are the first monuments you will see. The massive Colossi of Memnon, made of yellow-brown sandstone are 17,9M high. Once they were 21 M with crowns. The statues of king Amenophis, son of Hapoe, are crownless and faceless nowadays. if you have a good look, you can see at the base of the left colos Teje, the wife of the king and Moetemoeja the mother of the king.

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  • trotador's Profile Photo

    COLOSSUS OF MEMNON

    by trotador Written Dec 13, 2003

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    the huge statues

    These colossal statues is all that remains of a huge temple built by Amenophis III. A earthquake destroyed the temple 2000 years ago and the colossi are the only stones alive. The cracks caused by the quake in the statues makes some noise with the wind, for many centuries it was thought the noise was supernatural.

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    Colossi of Memnon

    by belgrade03 Written Mar 8, 2004

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    Colossi of Memnom site

    These gygantic statues are the only remains of the immense mortuary temple of Amenophis III built in the 14th century BC. Each is 18 meters high weighing 1300 tons. One is monolythic and the second is made of granite blocks. After a big earthquake in 27 BC, the blocks separated slightly and this statue began “singing” when the sun was rising. This site soon became a pilgrimage site for the Greeks and Romans who believed that their hero Agamemnon (Memnon) was greeting his mother Aurora, the goddess of the sunrise). After the restoration of the statue by Septimius Severus, it stopped singing.

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