Luxor Temple, Luxor

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  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    Luxor Temple

    by sue_stone Written Feb 12, 2005

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    Hypostyle Hall at night - Luxor Temple

    By the time we made it to Luxor Temple we were pretty exhausted - we had been on the go since early that day - balloon flight, temples, tombs....luckily the temple was beautiful enough to hold our attention and raise our flagging spirits!

    We arrived just before sunset, and entered through the fabulous front pylon to explore inside.

    There are lots of impressive columns in this temple - there are the large columns in the Colonnade of Amenhotep III, and then the equally impressive Hypostyle Hall where there are 32 columns.

    As the sunset over Luxor, the temple was lit up and the lights bouncing off the columns really added to our experience here.

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    A Mosque in a Temple!!?

    by sue_stone Written Feb 12, 2005

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    looking up to the mosque in Luxor Temple

    One of the really unique things about Luxor Temple is that it contains a mosque!

    For an extended period of time (a long long time ago), the Temple was buried beneath the streets and houses of Luxor. At one stage the mosque of Sufi Shaykh Yusuf Abu al-Hajjaj was built over it.

    When the Temple was eventually re-discovered and uncovered, the mosque was preserved, and today it is one of the highlights of a visit to the Temple.

    As you walk through the Temple, look up to your left and you will see this "door", which will help you to get a feel for how much of the Temple was buried at the time the mosque was built.

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    The Pylons

    by Jeca011 Written Jun 13, 2004

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    The Pylons

    The large pylon front, a kind of triumphal entrance, is about 64 m across. Two granite colossi of Ramses II on a throne (about 15 m high) frame the entrance. Originally four standing statues of Ramses II also were placed in front of the pylon. In addition, an 23 m obelisk stands at the ceremonial entrance.This obelisk's twin is in the Place de la Concorde in Paris. The pylon has four vertical indentations for the placement of flagstaffs. Inscriptions on the pylon cite Ramses II as the builder of the temple, even though he is only responsible for the pylon and the first courtyard. Bas-reliefs on the front depict scenes of military campaigns, specifically Ramses' battles with the Hittites in the fifth year of his reign.

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    Beyond the Hypostyle Hall

    by Jeca011 Written Jun 13, 2004

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    Beyond the Hypostyle Hall there are several smaller rooms, the central one was used later as a Christian church. This area, still with some of the original roof, was the most sacred area of the temple and had a gold-plated statue of the god Amon as well as a birth room with reliefs referring to the divine birth of Amenophis III.

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    Luxor Temple

    by Diana75 Updated Mar 2, 2006

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    Luxor Temple
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    Luxor Temple is located on the East Bank in the center of Luxor, separated from the Nile by Luxor's Corniche.

    The temple was built as the secret settlement of the Lord of Gods - namely "Amoun" who took the figure of "Mein", the God of Fertility and Reproduction in Egyptian mythology.

    The Luxor temple was built by Amenhotep III in the 18th Dynasty.

    Once every year, a great feast was held to transport the statue of god Amoun from the Karnak temple through the river to visit Luxor temple, which was called "The Southern Harem".

    The temple is marked by its rear rooms with prominent inscriptions, and the hall of columns whose crowns represent the figure of lotus flower.

    King Ramsis II added a front yard made of the beautiful sandstone.

    He also surrounded it with a row of columns, decorated it with statues made of granite or Aswan stone, and established in front of the temple a great palace ornamented by two granite obelisks, one of which was transferred to Concord square in Paris in 1836.

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    Luxor Temple

    by Jim_Eliason Written Jan 13, 2007

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    Luxor Temple
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    Second only to Karnak in size, this temple in downtown Luxor is a definite must see site in Egypt. It was begun by Amenophis III in the 1400's BC but owes much of this greatest works to the most famous pharaoh, Ramses II. A 3 KM avenue lined with Sphinxes once extended from this temple to Karnak.

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    Luxor Temple

    by clairegeordio Written Dec 18, 2004

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    Luxor Temple
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    This temple is situated in the centre of Luxor and was mainly built by Amenophis III, but the construction that we see now was mainly the work of Ramses II (1279-1213BC) and you can see many statues of him on the throne throughout the temple. Within the complex is a collonade consisting of 14 papyrus columns , each 19 metres tall. The walls are decorated with bas-reliefs showing the feast of Opet and date from the reign of Tutankhamun. (1333-1324BC).
    Entrance fee : 35LE (3.50 GBP)

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    Luxor Temple Part 2

    by ATXtraveler Written May 23, 2004

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    Admission ticket to Luxor Temple

    The Luxor temple is 20 Egyptian pounds to enter... that is about 3.50 US, but don't think of this as an entrance fee, but rather an investment in preserving the heritage of one of the oldest civilizations in the world.

    Enjoy... and just think, even if you do not like it... McDonald's is right around the corner!

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    Luxor Temple

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jul 18, 2007

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    Luxor Temple
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    Luxor temple has been stretched more than on a quarter of kilometer from the north to the south, along the Nile. It is devoted to the god of Amon. Pharaoh Amenhotep III started to build the temple. He has built a colonnade, a court yard framed columns of more modest sizes, a hypostyle hall and a sanctuary.

    Pharaoh Ramesses II has considerably expanded the temple. In front of the colonnade he constructed one more court yard, powerful pylon (width - 65 m, height-24) which frames its entrance. Pylon is a characteristic element of religious Egyptian architecture since time of the Average Empire. It is similar to a two quadrangular in the basis tower with oblique walls. It reminds original truncated pyramids connected by the stone crosspiece. Pylon represented the ceremonial entrance into the temple.

    Open 6.00-17.00, entrance fee - LE 35.

    You may see Luxor Temple in 1881 on the second pic.

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    Colossi of Ramses

    by catkin Written May 25, 2004

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    Colossi of Ramses and the obelisk

    The temple is guarded by the colossi of Ramses. Originally there were 6 statues of Ramses II here, four seated and two standing, along with two obelisks.
    Two statues and one obelisk were removed, the latter now standing in the Place de la Concorde in Paris.

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    Luxor Temple

    by Bavavia Updated Sep 12, 2004

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    Luxor Temple

    The temple of Luxor is close to the Nile and parallel with the riverbank. King Amenhotep III who reigned 1390-53 BC built this beautiful temple and dedicated it to Amon-Re, king of the gods, his consort Mut, and their son KhonsThis temple has been in almost continuos use as a place of worship right up to the present day. It was completed by Tutankhamun and Horemheb and added to by Ramses II. Towards the rear is a granite shrine dedicated to Alexander the Great

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    A wonderful guide to the history of the world

    by ATXtraveler Written May 23, 2004

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    Luxor Temple in the afternoon

    Even on the 8th day of our trip to Egypt, one of the things I was truly amazed at is the craft done by people over 5000 years ago. It is unimaginable to think about how long it took the Egyptians to build all of this, but the Luxor Temple and its connection to the Temple at Karnak is truly amazing. 2.5 miles seperates the two, but they are linked together by a row of ram guardian.

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    Luxor Temple Colonnade

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Jul 17, 2007

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    Luxor Temple Colonnade
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    There is the colonnade which consists of two lines of columns (16 m) in the court yard of Ramesses II (the size 57m x 51m). Their capitals are executed in the form of buds of a lotus - a symbol of Egypt. The walls of the court yard are strongly destroyed and decorated by bas-reliefs.

    The spacious court yard of Amenhotep III (the size is 50m x 45m) is the next part of the temple. Originally it has been framed from three sides by two lines of columns. Columns on both sides of the court yard are kept till now. Their capitals are executed in the form of buds of a lotus.

    You may find more detailed information here.

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  • rosegirl's Profile Photo

    Luxor Temple

    by rosegirl Written Dec 27, 2007

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    This is the temple of the god Amon legislature, which was celebrated far wedding to his wife-death-once a year flies you procession from the temple Alkrnk machine by the Nile to Luxor Temple due to the pharaonic temple building Amnanb III and Ramses II begins entrance to the temple edifice built by Ramses II, with which it worth Dkhman representing sitting. My temple Mseltan one list and the other still adorn the field Concorde in Paris following this edifice yard Ramses II access from three aspects sections of the columns in the form of a package supported papyrus.


    Mosque Abu pilgrims
    In the north-eastern part there is now a mosque Abu pilgrims rest of the temple, built Amnanb third, and starts Bekaa huge columns of the four hulls column divided into grades and get next to the large open courtyard and takes from three aspects rows of columns-and then get to the lobby columns and includes 32 column-Our inside the temple to get to the boat Bible Conference has been able to pay tribute to Alexander the Great small confined him bearing his name inside the restricted Amnanb III. Lastly, we come to Jerusalem holies room where the statue Bible and the four pillars.

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  • Jeca011's Profile Photo

    Luxor temple

    by Jeca011 Written Jun 13, 2004

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    Luxor temple

    This temple was dedicated to the thebes triad: Amon (king of Gods), Mut (his wife) and Khnum (their son, the moon God).

    The temple has a more unified plan than some Egyptian temples because it was essentially the work of only three pharaohs: Amenophis III, Tutankhamen, and Ramses II. Each new addition was situated in front of the older section. It has the typical Egyptian temple features: an entrance pylon, courtyards with porticoes, a hypostyle hall and at the end of the longitudinal axis, a sacred area, with the sanctuary, a birth house, and other small rooms, not accessible to the ancient public. In ancient times a 3,5 kilometers long avenue of sphinxes connected the two temples; originally these sphinxes had ram heads (Amon's symbol) but they were replaced with human-headed sphinxes in the 30th Dynasty.

    The temple is about 250 m long and about 65 m height.

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