Temple of Hatshepsut, Luxor

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  • Hatshepsut's Temple has 3 Levels
    Hatshepsut's Temple has 3 Levels
    by RavensWing
  • Temple carved directly out of rock
    Temple carved directly out of rock
    by RavensWing
  • Hatshepsut's Tomb
    Hatshepsut's Tomb
    by RavensWing
  • sue_stone's Profile Photo

    Temple of Hatshepsut

    by sue_stone Updated Apr 4, 2011

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Temple of Hatshepsut

    Hatshepsut was the most famous of the female pharaohs in Ancient Egypt. Her reign was the longest of all the female pharaohs, and her temple still stands as a tribute to her incredible rise to power. She was the the queen who became king.

    The temple is located close to the Valley of the Kings. It is partly cut into the cliff face and partly free-standing.

    It is quite a spectacular sight from from a distance, and well worth the walk from the car park, and the climb up the steps to the temple.

    Once you get up to the temple there is also a great view looking back across the valley.

    I have a few more photos from the temple in my Travelogue

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  • jumpingnorman's Profile Photo

    See the Temple of the Lady Pharaoh

    by jumpingnorman Updated Jan 19, 2009

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    Temple of Hatshepsut

    This woman pharaoh, Hatshepsut, has quite a story --- she was hated by her stepson (Tuthmoses III) and a lot of her images were destroyed. She had to wear men's clothes and accessories like a fake beard to assert her authority.

    She is the daughter of Tuthmoses I, married to her half-brother who became Tuthmoses II who in turn died early. Tuthmoses III was too young then, and Hatshepsut actually took the power from him --- hence, his dislike for her.

    She ruled quite for a while and built this huge temple on the side of a mountain, looking like it was carved out of the stone (this is the same temple where tourists were gunned down by terrorists decades ago according to my guide). The massacre of the tourists has led to very strict laws and security in Egypt with regards to tourism and no such incident has occured again at the temple (thank God!).

    It is speculated that Tuthmoses III had something to do with the death of her mother. Was she murdered? I think this is a great story that Angelina Jolie could probably pull off!

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    The tomb of Senenmut

    by croisbeauty Updated Apr 19, 2012

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    the tomb of Senenmut
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    Senenmut oe Senmut was the Steward of the God's wife (Hatshepsut) and Steward of the King's Daughter (Neferure) and it was very high ranked duty on the pharaohs court. After Hatshepsut was crowned pharaoh Senenmut was given more prestigious titles and became High Steward of the King. Senenmut was very intelligent man and in spite of a fact that his family was low class, he was extremelly well educated.
    Senenmut claims to be the chief architect of Hatshepsut's works at Deir el-Bahri. His masterpiece building project was the mortuary temple complex of Hatshepsut. He was, without doubts, the most important man in Hatshepsut's life.

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    Deir el-Bahri (Temple of Hatshepsut)

    by Jim_Eliason Written Jan 13, 2007

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    Deir el-Bahri (Temple of Hatshepsut)
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    Deir El-Bahri is the funerary temple of Egypt's only female pharaoh who ruled from 1503 to 1482 BC. In order to legitimize her standing as Pharaoh all representations of her show her as a man. This is one of the most highly restored temples of Egypt and gives you a real good feeling for what it looked like when it was built.

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  • Diana75's Profile Photo

    El Deer El Bahary (Temple of Queen Hatshepsut)

    by Diana75 Updated Mar 2, 2006

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    El Deer El Bahary
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    Temple of Queen Hatshepsut, known today as El Deer El Bahary, is located on the Luxor's west bank at the north end of the necropolis, about 6 kms from the Nile.

    Hatshepsut, the only woman that ever ruled as Pharaoh, set up her own mortuary temple and followed her father's example of having the temple built to better secure her body.

    The temple was built during the 18th Dynasty and consists mainly of three terraces linked by ramps.

    The first ramp presents queen Hatshepsut giving birth from god Ra, the second one presents queen Hatshepsut journey to Bot country (today Sudan) for where she brought spices and scents and the third one, where is also the Saint of the Saints, has been transformed by the Roman Christians at their arrival on this site.

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  • Andrew_W_K's Profile Photo

    Big is not always best

    by Andrew_W_K Updated Jul 6, 2009

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    Impressive temple of Hatshepsut

    This is the iconic sight that all tourists come to the west bank to see and as you approach it with the mountainous rocks towering above it certainly makes for an imposing and impressive location. For me though when I actually got to the temple I was a little bit disappointed. It is quite austere and militaristic in appearance when compared to Karnak or Luxor temples. The fact that it is in effect a mausoleum may account for its austerity but nonetheless it is more impressive (to me anyway) when viewed from a distance.
    For more info click the link below.

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  • rosegirl's Profile Photo

    Hatshepsut temple

    by rosegirl Written Dec 27, 2007

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    Life story of queen Hatshepsut is really interesting!! she was very strong woman and she wasn't really that kind of fair ideal person
    Queen "Hatshepsut" was the first one to send ships to the country's "Puntland" (Somalia now), so they are loaded and perfumes .. And "Hatshepsut" is the fifth kings of the eighteenth dynasty, which also belongs to the King "Tutankhamen." A daughter "Thutmose I," and wife "Thutmose II," has received the sentence with "Thutmose III," which was the son of one of her husband Gariaat, at the same time, her daughter's husband, and remained until her death in 1484 BC holding the reins of government, the ruling was over cogens her life, and deported "Thutmose III" from power, it was not described to him in the Governing

    Although she was a female had represented itself in the form of statues man has been flat without breasts, and has borrowed to live. Having died liberation "Thutmose III" from the trusteeship of heavy, and I like to retaliate against them Vatm construction of the temple, and the proportion of the same, and the name and crush most forms excavated and icons, and a place name and his titles in many quarters (please look the pictures i put inside)

    The design and implementation of building the temple Engineer "die" QC and one close to it. It belongs to a family of modest "Armant" but became the first president to acknowledge reception of the royal family, and the President receiving machine "Amon", and is in charge of all construction, so it made the greatest professional successes in the history of ancient Egypt.

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  • kenmerk's Profile Photo

    Temple of Hatshepsut

    by kenmerk Updated Jan 6, 2004

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    Temple of Hatshepsut

    Another absolute must see in Luxor is the Temple of Hatshepsut. This temple was built to honour the one female Pharaoh in Egyptian history.

    The scenery here is stunning, the temple is partially carved out of a sheer cliff and the center ramp will lead you up to a series of three terraces.

    While the setting is majestic, the recent history at Hatsehpsut is more subdued, though. It was here that 58 German tourist were gunned down by terrorists in 1997.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    The story of Hatshepsut - chapter 1

    by croisbeauty Updated Apr 18, 2012

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    the mortuary temple of Hatshepsut
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    Hatshepsut was the sixth pharaoh of the 18th dynasty, one of the few and the most successful woman who ruled Egypt as pharaoh. She was born at the dawn of a glorious age of Egyptia imperial power and prosperity called the New Kingdom. Her father was Thutmose I, a charismatic leader pf legendary military exploits. It seems that Hatshepsut idolized her father.
    Thutmose I fathered two sons with Queen Ahmes but both died very young, thus the son of a secondary wife was crowned Thutmose II. Young Thutmose II was married to his half sister Hatshepsut, making her Queen of Egypt at about age of 12.

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  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    Hatshetsup's Temple

    by ATXtraveler Written May 23, 2004

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    Long distance view of Hatshetsup's Temple

    To see this temple, you definitely have to take into consideration the person who it is dedicated to... Queen Hatshetsup was actually a pharaoh, and a woman... which were supposed to be mutually exclusive. She actually convinced the country that she was in fact a man to become the Pharaoh.

    This temple is definitely different than the others. It is built into the side of the mountain, and is right next to the site of an older destroyed temple.

    It also has a wonderful view of the Lower Nile Valley.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    Burial customs

    by croisbeauty Updated Apr 23, 2012

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    remains from Deir el-Bahri
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    Egyptians had an elaborate set of burial customs which, according to their beliefs, were necessary to ensure their immortality after death. During different periods and kingdoms, the customs have been changed.
    The rituals and protocols included mummification, casting of magic spells and burial with grave goods thought to be needed in the afterlife. After the mummy was prepared, it would need to be re-animated symbolically by the priest. The tombs were filled with goods of daily life objects, such as furniture, jewelry, bowls, combs, food, pottery and stone vessels. Also, The Book of the Dead which was collection of spells designed to guide the deceased in the afterlife.
    Velthy Egyptians were buried in wooden or stone coffins and in later period their coffins were provided with a small "shabti" statues, actually working class who would perfom works for the noble and rich people in their afterlife.
    Ancient Egyptians believed that one could only attain an afterlife if one's body was mummified and preserved. That is why criminals and conspirators against the pharaoh, if not being of noble royal origins, have been destroyed in fire so that couldn't expect immortality. If conspirators, however, were of royal origins they have been poisoned in order that their bodies could be mummified.

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  • croisbeauty's Profile Photo

    El Khokha necropolis

    by croisbeauty Updated Apr 19, 2012

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    El Khokha necropolis
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    El Khokha necropolis is located on the West Bank at Thebes. The necropolis is based around a hill and has five Old Kingdom tombs and over 50 tombs from the 18th, 19th and 20th dynasties, as well as some from the first intermediate period and the late period. The site is named after a modern time village. It name is unclear but could be translated as peach or vault. In Arabic it is term in used to describe an "opening in a wall", a gate or a wicked gate, possibly referring to the entrance to the rock-cut tonbs.
    There is also cemetery of ancient city Sheikh Abd el-Qurna with a number of necropolis for the noble Egyptians.

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    Mortuary temple of Queen Hatshepsut

    by catkin Written May 25, 2004

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    Mortuary temple of Queen Hatshepsut

    Queen Hatshepsut was the only female Pharoah.
    The daughter of Tuthmose I, Hatshepsut married her half brother and heir to the throne. He succeeded to the throne as Tuthmose II but died in his early 30’s with only a young son as his successor. Although this young boy was named as Tuthmose III, his stepmother Hatshepsut acted as regent for the youngster. She later usurped his position and declared herself pharaoh. She is depicted on statues with the full regalia of the king and a fake beard that she apparently took to wearing.

    There were originally three temples standing side by side in this area but only Hatshepsuts temple remains although it was vandalised by Tuthmose III out of spite at being kept from the throne. When discovered in the mid 19th century, the temple was in ruins and its present condition is mainly due to reconstruction undertaken by a Polish and Egyptian team.

    Only the main part of the temple has been recreated. Originally there would have been a sphinx lined avenue and the huge entrance pylon seen at other temples. An inner court would have been inside the pylon at the position of the first ramp.

    The queens’ obelisks are also no longer here; one of them was transported to Karnak.

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    Deir-el-Bahri: Hatshepsut's Temple

    by Court94403 Updated May 12, 2008

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    Hatshepsut's Temple @Deir el Bahri
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    Hatshepsut was the female pharaoh of Upper and Lower Egypt. She was the ruler of the 18th Dynasty for 20 years. Hatshepsut was the daughter of Tuthmose I, 3rd King of the 18th Dynasty. When Hatshepsut's father died, her half-brother, Tuthmose II became king. Because Tuthmose II was too young Hatshepsut became his regent, (the women in Egypt carried the royal bloodline). They ruled together until some say Hatshepsut made herself Pharaoh. When her brother/husband Tuthmose II died, Hatshepsut was a widow made to rule alone. However, Tuthmose II had a son by another wife, Tuthmose III. Many experts now say that Tuthmose III is the pharaoh that tried to have Hatshepsut wiped from history probably due to the fact that she was a woman.

    Tuthmose III wanted history to show that the succession of pharaohs were all men.
    Before Hatshepsut there were queens who ruled Egypt, but never a female pharaoh.

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  • sachara's Profile Photo

    Temple of Hatshepsut, Deir al- Bahri

    by sachara Written Aug 21, 2003

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    Temple of Hatshepsut

    Beside the Temple of king Montuhotep (11th dynasty) the architects Senmun and Dedia built 500 years later the Temple for the queen Hatshepsut, inspired by the neigbouring temple. The temple is special by the location at the eastern cliffs of the Thebian mountains, partly harmonious built in the slopes as if nature self had done the job. The Temple has series of terraces, who ascend to the sanctuary. The first terrace is enclosed by a portico of 22 pillars and flanked by two Osiris pillars.
    The ambiance is very impressing.

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