Valley of the Kings, Luxor

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  • Map of the Valley of Kings
    Map of the Valley of Kings
    by RavensWing
  • Pathways to the Tombs
    Pathways to the Tombs
    by RavensWing
  • Tombs of the Kings
    Tombs of the Kings
    by RavensWing
  • mary2u99's Profile Photo

    Valley of the King

    by mary2u99 Updated May 12, 2007

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    There are several tombs in the valley of kings and standard ticket for 3 tombs for 55 EGP. I visited Ramses I (No.16), Tuthmosis III (NO. 34) and Tawosret/Sethnakht (No. 14). Some tombs are closed for upgrading or renovation. Most people will pay for the extra 70EGP to see the Tomb of Tutankhamun.

    The tomb is composed of several rooms and corridors leading to the Burial Chamber.
    The most important of these tombs are those of: Tut-Ankh-Amun - Ramses III , Seti I , Ramses VI , Amenhotep II , Tuthmosis III , Hur-Moheb.

    Valley of the King Valley of the King Valley of the King Valley of the King Valley of the King
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    Valley of the Kings

    by yurxlnc Updated Mar 28, 2007

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    The Valley of the Kings is the resting place of most of the kings of the 18th Dynasty. Of course, the most famous is that of Tutankhamun.
    Entrance to the Valley is by tuk-tuk , tractor driven trains. Then it is up to you [and which tombs are open] what to do next. Tombs can be found deep into the valley, or even up the cliff face [Tuthmosos III]. The tombs are well marked and indicate whether there are steps to climb or ramps to allow disabled access. We started off with Ramses Ix which is a well decorated tomb, and then [foolishly] climbed up and up to Tuthmosis III's tomb, which was quite simple for such a powerful king. After that we were so exhausted that we found another tomb with straightforward accessibility.
    We promised ourselves another trip, but haven't managed it yet.

    in the valley of the kings.
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  • Beograd's Profile Photo

    Valley of Kings

    by Beograd Updated Jan 29, 2007

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    Well this is the famous Valley of Kings. y the time we arrived here I was too sick to leave the bus at this site. Those who went inside told me that I didn't miss much. Still, I don't believe them and I hope that some day I'll go there and see it.

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  • kentishgirl's Profile Photo

    Valley Of The Kings

    by kentishgirl Updated Jan 19, 2007

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    The Valley Of The Kings is a huge site, and needs a lot of time to visit! When planning your day bear in mind a few factors - The Heat is a huge factor, it will wear you out - be careful. Also think about how you will get from one site to the next as some of them are far apart - We found that a tour here was a good idea.

    The Tombs are amazing, but there can be queues to get into them. There are plenty of information boards all around explainng everything in English.

    Valley of the Kings
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    Valley of the Kings (Thebes Necropolis)

    by Jim_Eliason Written Jan 13, 2007

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    The Valley of Kings was the secet burial place of Middle and New Kingdom Pharaohs. The sight contains 64 known tombs and undoubtly many more are near by that have not yet been discovered. All the tombs except one (King Tut's) was robbed and contain no grave goods. However most of them include magnificent freizes, many of which preserve the original colors despite 3,000 years of aging. Unfortunately no photography is allowed in the tombs so I can not show you. It is believed that this particular site was chosen for the necropolis due to the natural Pyramidal shape of the adjoining mountain.

    Valley of the Kings (Thebes Necropolis) Valley of the Kings (Thebes Necropolis) Valley of the Kings (Thebes Necropolis) Valley of the Kings (Thebes Necropolis) Valley of the Kings (Thebes Necropolis)
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    Valley of the Kings

    by miman Written Jul 19, 2006

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    The Valley of the King is a valley in Egypt where tombs were built for the Pharaohs and powerful nobles of the New Kingdom, the Eighteenth through Twentieth Dynasties of Ancient Egypt. It is separated into the East and West Valleys, with most of the important tombs in the East Valley. The West Valley has only one tomb open to the public: the tomb of Ay, Tutankhamun's successor. There are a number of other important burials there, including that of Amenhotep III, but these are still being excavated and are not publicly accessible. The Valley was used for primary burials from approximately 1539 BC to 1075 BC, and contains some 64 tombs, starting with Thutmose I and ending with Ramesses X or XI.
    Perhaps the most famous discovery of modern Western archaeology was made here by Howard Carter on November 4, 1922, with clearance and conservation work continuing until 1932. King Tutankhamun's tomb was the first royal tomb to be discovered that was still largely intact (although tomb robbers had entered it), and was considered the last major discovery in the valley. Tutankhamun was a rather minor king and other burials probably had more numerous treasures.

    Tutankhamun's tomb
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    Valley of the Kings

    by sswagner Written Jul 15, 2006

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    Beneath a natural pyramid-shaped mountain is a valley containing tombs from a long line of kings. There are still archeologists in the area searching for more possible hidden chambers beneath the earth. Famous rulers such as King Tutankhamen were buried here along with vast treasure. Most of the tombs were already looted when they were discovered. King Tutankhamen's was intact, and his mummy still resides here. A ticket allows visitors access into three tombs. An additional fee is required to enter the tomb of Tutankhamen. Be aware that photographs are not allowed inside the tombs. A guidebook can be quite helpful to explain some of the inscriptions and art in the tombs. While the outside is a harsh barren landscape, the interiors are richly decorated with Egyptian scenes.

    Entrance to a tomb
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    Valley of the Kings - Tombs inside

    by Innovator Written Jun 5, 2006

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    The Valley of the Kings is a valley in Egypt where tombs were built for the Pharaohs and powerful nobles of the New Kingdom, the Eighteenth through Twentieth Dynasties of Ancient Egypt.

    The valley is stands on the west bank of the Nile, across from Thebes (modern Luxor), under the peak of the pyramid-shaped mountain Al-Qurn. It is separated into the East and West Valleys, with most of the important tombs in the East Valley. The West Valley has only one tomb open to the public: the tomb of Ay, Tutankhamun's successor. There are a number of other important burials there, including that of Amenhotep III, but these are still being excavated and are not publicly accessible.

    The official name for the site was The Great and Majestic Necropolis of the Millions of Years of the Pharaoh, Life, Strength, Health in The West of Thebes, or more usually, Ta-sekhet-ma'at (the Great Field).

    SEE TRAVELOGUES FOR MORE PICTURES (PICTURES INSIDE NOT ALLOWED AND STRICTLY CONTROLLED!)

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  • Sambawalk's Profile Photo

    Valley of the Kings

    by Sambawalk Written May 28, 2006

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    There are several tombs in the valley of kings where you can visit. You buy a standard ticket for 3 tombs for 55 EGP (May 2006). Some tombs may be closed for upgrading or renovation. This ticket excludes the Tomb of Tutankhamun for (70 EGP).

    It is a matter of choices, I visited: Ramses I (No.16), Tuthmosis III (NO. 34) and Tawosret/Sethnakht (No. 14). You need about 1.5 hours to visit 3 tombs.

    Tomb of Ramses I (No. 16) Refliefs in Tomb of Ramses I (No. 16) Tuthmosis III (NO. 34) Tawosret/Sethnakht (No. 14). From main entrance to tombs area

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    Tuthmosis III's tomb

    by uglyscot Updated May 1, 2006

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    If your legs and lungs can manage the steep long climb up the wooden steps to the tomb near the top of the cliff, it is interesting to see the simple decoration of the pharaoh called the Napoleon of Egypt. He inherited the throne from his father when only a child. His stepmother and wife Hatchepsut acted as Regent and eventually claimed the title of Pharaoh. When Tuthmosis reached manhood and took over the reins of government he proved himself the best soldier king Egypt ever had. In spite of this his tomb decorations are so simple, stick figures, rather like the hieratic hieroglyphics..
    The main photo shows a representation of the layout of the tomb.

    Tuthmosis III stick-like figures The Book of Gates
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    Look up

    by uglyscot Updated May 1, 2006

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    When visiting tombs, don't forget to look up as even the ceilings can be decorated . From the earliest times [eg IVthe Dynasty] ceilings were often painted blue or black with 5 pointed yellow stars. In later times an actual zodiac was found. In this tomb there is an astronomical ceiling in the middle corridor.

    In the photo taken in the tomb of Ramses IX, the god Bes [ the only god represented full face] sits above a lintel. Other gods and goddesses walk above him.

    ceiling from Ramses IX tomb ceiling detail the god Knum
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    Tomb of Ramses IX

    by uglyscot Updated May 1, 2006

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    This is a large tomb with excellent paintings. It is usually crowded, so that photography was difficult, and the paintings are protected by glass or plastic. Nowadays photography is forbidden in all tombs.
    The long straight corridor is typical of the tombs from the late Ramesside period.

    The main photo shows the scarab in a solar barque between two uadjet eyes, sailing on the snake representing Time.

    scarab and snake from Ramses IX bull-headed figures snakes and mourners crocodile in a boat solar barque of Ra
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    The Stable Rock Outcrop of the Valley

    by atufft Written Apr 11, 2006

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    The Valley of the Kings is located in a rather remarkably stable rock formation that is also not impossible to tunnel into. The towering formations are themselves of some interest, and so I've included a few images here. It's important to arrive either in the morning or late afternoon to avoid the bus loads of tourists that crowd into the valley. There are however some tombs that are left off the tour guide itinerary that can be rather pleasant in their isolation. There is also a trail that leads over the hill to the Temple of Hatshepsut. The American University in Cairo's Theban Mapping Project is a good website for an overview of the Valley of the Kings, and so a link is provided below.

    Valley of the Kings Rock Outcrop Main Entrance to Valley of the Kings Entrance to Unknown Tomb Rock Outcrop at Valley of the Kings
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    Tomb #19: Prince Mentuherkhepershef

    by atufft Written Apr 11, 2006

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    One of the nice least visited tombs is the burial location for the son of Ramses IX, Prince Mentuherkhepershef. I couldn't find any details about him. Regarding the tomb, apparently it was originally intended for Ramses VIII, but he was buried in some other as yet unknown place. The royal fabrics worn by the prince are painted in vivid colors in this tomb.

    Prince Mentuherkhepershef and Osiris Mentuherkhepershef Tomb #19 Prince  Mentuherkhepershef and Hathor
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    The Valley of the Kings

    by Diana75 Updated Mar 2, 2006

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    The Valley of the Kings (ancient Thebes) lies about 7km from the Nile on the west bank and is one of the most amazing discoveries made in Egypt.

    Here is the place where bodies of Tutankhamoun, Ramses II, Ramses IV, Tutmose III and many other kings once lay.

    It is said that the Pharaoh Tutmose I decided to build this kind of burial ground due to the frequent tomb rubbings.

    Inside the tombs inscriptions from the Book for the Dead provided instructions for how the Pharaoh may have a safe trip to the next world and how to avoid the dangers that lay on the way.

    The tombs in the Valley of the Kings belong to the Eighteenth, Nineteenth and Twentieth Families.

    Here are 62 tombs, including some small tombs which are not considered royal.

    Valley of the Kings
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