Valley of the Kings, Luxor

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  • Map of the Valley of Kings
    Map of the Valley of Kings
    by RavensWing
  • More Tombs of the Kings
    More Tombs of the Kings
    by RavensWing
  • A new tomb found the day before
    A new tomb found the day before
    by RavensWing
  • Diana75's Profile Photo

    Tut-Ankh-Amun Tomb

    by Diana75 Updated Mar 2, 2006

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    Tut-Ankh-Amun Tomb (now permanently closed) is near Merenptah tomb, which we visited.

    The tomb was discovered by the English Lord Carter under the tomb of Ramses VI.

    Actually it was discovered by mistake: inside Ramses VI's funeral room was an opening going down to Tut-Ankh-Amun's tomb, the only one found intact.

    All the items found in the tomb, except a sarcophagus and the Tut-Ankh-Amun's mummy, were moved to the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

    It's interesting that Tut-Ankh-Amun is well-known in history because of his wealthy and not because of his personal accomplishments.

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    Entrance

    by Jeca011 Updated Jun 15, 2004

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    Map of Valley of the Kings

    The entrance fee is 20.00 LE per person. It includes visiting of 3 tombs. My advice - get 2 tickets and visit 6 tombs. Tickets for Tutankhamun`s tomb are separate and entrance fee is 40.00 LE per person.

    If you want take photographs inside you'll need very sensitive film (for night shoots) because flash is not permitted. Or you can be only group (very small) in that tomb and guardian can “close his eyes” for couple of shoots. We give him at the end some “baksheesh” :)

    p.s. don't tell his boss for this :)

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    KV 43 - Tomb of Thutmes IV

    by Jeca011 Written Jun 15, 2004

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    Tomb of Thutmes IV

    This tomb was not suffered flood-water damage and paintings are preserved.


    Thutmes IV, 1419-1386 B.C.

    Son of Amenhetep II and the Royal Wife Tia'a, Thutmes IV claimed in the so-called “Dream Stela” at Giza that he had been made pharaoh because he obeyed the wish of the god Horemakhet by clearing sand away from the body of the Great Sphinx (which represented that god). This is a fiction, of course, probably meant to satisfy religious aspects of New Kingdom kingship.

    Thutmes IV was not active militarily and there are fewer military officials during his reign than in his predecessors’. There was, however, a very large civil and religious bureaucracy. His building activities mainly involved adding to existing temples, but he constructed a small mud-brick temple for himself on the West Bank at Thebes immediately south of the Ramesseum, and an Egyptian alabaster shrine at Karnak, now reconstructed in the Karnak Open-Air Museum.

    His tomb was unfinished at the time of his death.

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  • kenmerk's Profile Photo

    Valley of the Tourists (I'm mean Kings...)

    by kenmerk Written Jan 6, 2004

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    Valley of the Tourists....

    One of the absolute must see's in Luxor is Valley of the Kings... and as such, it obviously gets scads and scads of tourists. (see picture of the wave of humanity walking up the hill...)

    Admission is 20 EP, I believe, which will allow you entry into three of the tombs of your choosing. (I saw Ramses III, Ramses VI, and Merneptah (one of Ramses II sons))

    If you want to go see King Tut's tomb it is a separate ticket for an additional 40 EP.

    It is a shame though you can no longer take pictures inside the tombs... The artwork that adorn the walls of these tombs is just amazing.

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  • Diana75's Profile Photo

    Visit the tombs in the Valley of the Kings

    by Diana75 Updated Mar 2, 2006

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    Valley o fthe Kings

    Although not all the tombs are always open to visitors, the more interesting ones usually are.

    We visited three tombs, Ramses IX (KV6 - 20th Dynasty), Merenptah (KV8) and Ramses IV (KV2 - 20th Dynasty) assigned by the ticketing office according to the number of visitors.

    The tombs are electrically lighted and give a more impressive image, exposing more of the artistic detail.

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    Tuthmosis III's tomb

    by uglyscot Updated May 1, 2006

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    Tuthmosis III
    2 more images

    If your legs and lungs can manage the steep long climb up the wooden steps to the tomb near the top of the cliff, it is interesting to see the simple decoration of the pharaoh called the Napoleon of Egypt. He inherited the throne from his father when only a child. His stepmother and wife Hatchepsut acted as Regent and eventually claimed the title of Pharaoh. When Tuthmosis reached manhood and took over the reins of government he proved himself the best soldier king Egypt ever had. In spite of this his tomb decorations are so simple, stick figures, rather like the hieratic hieroglyphics..
    The main photo shows a representation of the layout of the tomb.

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    VALLEY OF THE KINGS

    by trotador Written Dec 13, 2003

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    the valley

    So far the valley has 62 discovered tombs. The last one was the Tutankhamun one.
    The ticket allows to visit only three toms, for the Tutankhamun one it is needed to pay LE40 more.
    I visited the Seti ll tomb. This is the only tomb with a mummy inside.
    My second tomb was Tausert - Setnakht. There are some drawings with front faces, somethig weird on Egypcian art (the 3rd dimension). Planets, flying people...
    The third tomb was Ramesses lll tomb. It was one of the most beautiful and biggest.
    I visited also the Tutankhamon Tomb. It was funny because we were only two persons inside, myself and my girlfriend and a guy show us the tomb as "ilegal guide" at the end he asked for a tip...

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  • Shofja's Profile Photo

    Tomb of Tutankhamun

    by Shofja Updated Dec 28, 2004

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    Tutankhamun (Egyptian Museum, Cairo)

    The most famous Egyptian pharaoh today is, without doubt, Tutankhamun.
    The story of Howard Carter's discovery of the tomb of the young-king Tutankhamun on the 4th of November in 1922 is well known - it was the first time when a unrobbered royal tomb had been found. Of course, the tomb robbers had visited this tomb, but they only had been hurriedly "restored the order".
    There are a lot of stories about Tutankhamun and The Curse of Tutankhamun.
    Who knows where is the truth???

    Entrance: 70,- LE
    NO photo or video

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  • Luchonda's Profile Photo

    The secret of a tomb

    by Luchonda Updated May 23, 2005

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    Toetanchamon

    A must see : the Valley of Kings.
    The Valley of the Kings contains approximately sixty-two excavated thombs
    of which the most famous one is the thomb of Toet - No 62 (Attention - extra fee to pay)
    Discovered by Howard Carter in november 1922
    But inside - it is rather empty -you have to visit
    the National Museum in Cairo to explore the richness of his tomb.
    So is this a tourist trap or not ?!

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  • Jeca011's Profile Photo

    Tombs

    by Jeca011 Updated Jun 15, 2004

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    Map of tombs

    Tuthomosis I was the first Pharaoh to have his tomb cut, around 1495 BCE, and was followed by later Kings, over the next 500 years. There are 62 tombs in the valley. Each tomb is numbered in order of its discovery, but only about a dozen tombs are currently open to the public.

    We visited:

    KV 2 - Tomb of Ramses IV
    KV 8 - Tomb of Merenptah
    KV 11 - Tomb of Ramses III
    KV 16 - Tomb of Ramses I
    KV 17 - Tomb of Seti I
    KV 43 - Tomb of Thutmes IV

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    KV 62 - Tomb of Tutankhamen

    by Jeca011 Written Jun 15, 2004

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    Entrance of Tutankhamen's tomb

    When his tomb was discovered by Howard Carter in 1922, Tutankhamen became the most famous ruler of the ancient world. We didn't go inside because we didn't have time but next time I'll go inside.



    Tutankhamen, 1334-1325 B.C.

    There are many theories about the parentage of Egypt’s most famous pharaoh, Tutankhamen. Some say he was a son of Akhenaten, others that he was his brother or half-brother, still others that he was a distant and minor relative. We know that he was born into the royal family and that he was probably raised at al Amarnah. Originally named Tutankhaten (“Living Image of the Aten”), his name was changed to Tutankhamen (“Living Image of Amen”) after the death of Akhenaten and when he succeeded Semenkhkara to the throne. He was crowned pharaoh when he was only nine years old and two principal royal advisors, Iy and Horemheb, apparently managed the affairs of state. Each of these advisors would succeed Tutankhamen in turn when the boy-king died eight years after his coronation.

    One of the first acts of Tutankhamen’s reign was to re-open the temples of Egypt’s traditional deities. Authority was restored to priesthoods that Akhenaten had ignored, especially the priesthood of Amen at Karnak. There, and at Luxor Temple, the young king’s advisors authorized major building campaigns. A stela at Karnak, called the “Restoration Stela,” tells of these activities.

    Tutankhamen died when he was only seventeen years old. The cause of death is not known, although a small fragment of bone in his skull (visible in x-rays) has led some to suggest that he was murdered. He was apparently to have been buried in KV 23, but that tomb was not finished at the time of his unexpected death, and he was therefore hastily interred in KV 62, buried with thousands of magnificent objects, but virtually devoid of the usual carved and painted walls.

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  • belgrade03's Profile Photo

    The Valley of the Kings

    by belgrade03 Written Mar 8, 2004

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    Valley of the Kings

    The Valley of the Kings is situated in the Western mountain that lies parallel with the Nile on the opposite side of the Luxor and Karnak temples. So far there have been 62 tombs of the kings of the 19th and 20th dynasties found. They are hidden in the heart of the mountain arranged around a longitudianl axis. Long corridors, painted with scenes of kings’ afterlives, meeting the Gods and becoming divinities themselves, lead to subterranean temples with sarcophaguses of kings. Perhaps the most breathtaking is the tomb of Ramses Vand VI with gygantic granite lid of the box that housed the king’s sarcophagus and the ceiling painted so fascinately that can be compared in its greatness with the famous Sistine chapel with the original paint pigments still in place. And we are talking about something 3200 years old!
    There is also the tomb of Hatshepsut found here, the only woman pharaoh as well as the most famous tomb – that of Tutankhamen. Tutankhamen’s tomb was found in 1922 by Howard Carter, so much after the others perhaps because of its unusual position. It lies beneath the tomb of Ramses V and VI and it was sealed with stones during the building of the aforementioned one. It is poorly decorated but its immense treasures made it the most famous. The treasures from the Tutankhamen’s tomb can nowadays be seen in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, including the phenomenal 11 kg gold mask of the boy-pharaoh.

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    Valley of the Kings

    by catkin Written May 25, 2004

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    Natural pyramid

    No trip to Luxor would be complete without a trip to the Valley of the Kings on the west bank.
    Although there isn’t much to take photographs of here, as all the tombs are underground, the valley is dominated by a natural pyramid.
    The entrance fee allows you to visit 3 tombs. We visited the tombs of Ramses I, III and VI and although the treasures have long gone the wall paintings are spectacular.

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  • Shofja's Profile Photo

    Valley of the Kings

    by Shofja Updated Dec 28, 2004

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    Valley of the Kings

    We visited the Valley of the Kings in deep afternoon, in fact we were the last group. So, there were no crowds of tourists :-) And the heat wasn't so heavy as in the middle of the day. We wisited 3 tombs (as all tourists) - in reality i doesn't remember whose tombs these were... :-) But these tombs were beautiful.
    Next time when i will be here, i wil spend longer time and try to wisit not only 3, but much more tombs. :-)

    Entrance: 55,- LE (you can visit 3 tombs); students: 30,-LE
    Tomb of Tutankhamun: 70,-LE (there isn't possible to make photos or film)
    Photo: 5,-LE (each tomb)
    Video: 100,-LE

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    Tomb of Tawsret

    by uglyscot Written Jun 30, 2005

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    Horus and Maat
    4 more images

    The tomb of Queen Tawsret and Siptah in the VAlley of the Kings is an easy one to visit as it does not involve climbing or steps. The walls are brightly painted and there is a sarcophagus.
    The photo shows Ra , the hawk headed sun god, and Maat the goddess of Justice with an ostrich feather[ symbolizing the feather against the dead's heart is weighed]. Horus is carrying a lotus blossom and an ankh [the symbol of life].

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