Valley of the Queens, Luxor

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  • Valley of the Queens
    by tim07
  • At the Valley of the Queens, West Bank, Egypt
    At the Valley of the Queens, West Bank,...
    by jumpingnorman
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    My guide by the door of Titi's tomb,...
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    Valley of queens

    by rosegirl Written Dec 27, 2007

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    the most important tomb is the one of queen Nefertari the wife of king Ramsis the second.
    Nefertari Meri-en-mut (a name meaning “the Lovely One, Beloved of Mut”) most probably married the great pharaoh Ramesses II before he mounted the throne and she held a position altogether peculiar and unequalled in the history of Egypt. Numerous epithets define her as the “sweet of love”, the “pretty – looking”, the “rich in charm”.

    This leading role, compared with the other numberless wives of pharaohs, is confirmed by the fact that she was always in Ramesses’ retinue, not only during civil and religious ceremonies, but even in the course of important journeys, like the one made to Nubia in the year 24 of his reign (around 1255 BC), on the occasion of the inauguration of the little temple of abu Simbel dedicated to the goddess hathor and to Nefertari herself: the queen is represented in large statues equal in size with those of the pharaoh, an extraordinary fact, considering that generally the wife was shown at the side of the pharaoh hardly coming up to his knee.

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    Don't miss the Valley of the Queens

    by jumpingnorman Updated May 19, 2009

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    At the Valley of the Queens, West Bank, Egypt
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    I was travelling in Egypt with the daughter of one of my senior doctors, and she was interested in learning more about the lady rulers of Egypt. So, we did go to the Valley of the Queens. I only heard of the Valley of the Kings then - I did not know there was one for Queens!

    I was on my first day in Egypt then and still hesitant to take pictures inside the tombs, but I did remember taking this picture of my guide outside the tomb of Tyti, designated QV 52.

    The valley of The Queens is located on the West Bank at Luxor (ancient Thebes), and most tourists just visit the more famous Valley of the Kings. The wives of Pharaohs were buried here which was known in acient times as Ta-Set-Neferu, meaning –‘the place of the Children of the Pharaoh’. At the times of the Queens of the 18th, 19th and 20th dynasties (1550–1070 BC), their children were also buried here.

    There are more than 70 tombs and you should not miss the the wonderfully decorated tomb of Queen Nefertari (1290–1224 BCE) of the 19th Dynasty which was carved out of the rock and with the reliefs in her tomb still with the very color it had during ancient times! The dryness in Egypt really preserves everything!

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    Tomb #44 Khaemwaset, Part I

    by atufft Written Apr 7, 2006

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    Prince and Gods
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    The Valley of the Queens actually appears to have more tombs dedicated to princes than queens. The Valley is somewhat less impressive than Valley of the Kings, but still has a surround of the rugged outcrop from which the tombs are carved. My notes for these images say that we visited tomb #44, Prince Khaemwaset, but the description by Lonely Planet for tomb #55 of Ramses III's son Amunherkhepshep bears a strong resemblance to the images provided here. If anyone can provide confirmation or correction for these images, please do so, otherwise enjoy. All the tombs are relatively close, but I recommend taking good notes. In these images of the prince, his father, and the gods to which he is introduced, notice the royal clothing. The see-through fabric indicates quite a highly refined skill in weaving for sure.

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    Tomb of Khaemwaset (QV 44)

    by clairegeordio Written Dec 18, 2004

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    This is the tomb of another of Ramses III’s sons and again is lavishly decorated. The colours are very well preserved. This tomb, along with the tomb of Amun-her-khepshef were the last to be discovered in the Valley of the Queens. It was discovered in 1903.

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    Valley of the Queens

    by clairegeordio Written Dec 18, 2004

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    Valley of the Queens

    This was the resting place of more than 80 queens, royal princes and high court officials, a few kilometres from Valley of the Kings. Valley of the Queens was a lot less touristy than Valley of the Kings, with only what seemed like a handful of people there. One advantage is that you had the tombs more or less to yourselves, however, ‘guides’ took advantage of this by pointing everything out to you and expecting a tip at the end. Even though Nefertari’s tomb wasn’t open, it was still worth seeing the other tombs that were open: Amun-her-khepshef, Khaemwaset and Titi. Entrance fee : 20 LE (2 GBP) to see three tombs.

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    Tomb of Amun-her-khepshef (QV 55)

    by clairegeordio Written Dec 18, 2004

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    This is the tomb of one of Ramses III sons’s and is the most popular tomb in Valley of the Queens. He died when he was very young - probably fifteen. This tomb is full of wall decorations, including Amun-her-khepshef and his father greeting the goddess Hathor as he led him into the underworld. When we got to the burial chamber at the end, the ‘guide’ gave us a torch to look into a display that had a mummified foetus in it.

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    Tomb of Nefertari, the best tomb in Egypt

    by sachara Updated Aug 22, 2003

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    view at the valley of the queens

    In the Valley of the Queens are 75 tombs of queens and princesses of the 19th and 20 th dynasties. Only 5 tombs are open for the public. We visit them all, included the best tomb of Egypt, the tomb of Nefertari, discovered in 1904 and first opened for the public in 1995.
    Only 150 visitors a day are allowed to visit the tomb for 10 minutes only. "Take 5 minutes more, if you need" whispered the guard at the entrance at our early morning visit.
    Ramses II, the husband of Nefertari ordered to build this beautifull tomb. The paintings in the seven chambers have very bright colours. The scenes are portraying a charming woman with beautifull face in long white transparant garments.
    For many visitors it's a rather emotional experience to visit this tomb. I saw people with tears in the eyes and people who had to go out to take some fresh air before re-entering and looking at the breathtaking scenes again.
    At this moment I look at the booklet with all the amazing scenes and realise this is the best I've ever seen in Egypt. So, a really must see. It's worth the money.
    Entrance tomb Nefertari: 100 Egyptian pound
    Entrance 4 other tombs together: 12 Egyptian pound.

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    Valley of the Queens

    by SumTingWong Written Mar 15, 2003

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    Outside the Valley of the Qeens

    Located near the Valley of the Kings is the Valley of the Queens. This also has some amazing tombs, including that if the great Queen Nefertari, wife of ramese II. This tomb in in perfect condition is is AMAZING and you MUST go!!!!!!

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    Valley of the Queen

    by mary2u99 Updated May 12, 2007

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    Valley of the Queen
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    There are about 75 tombs in the valley of the Queens, only but only few are open for visit. They are Tomb of Amunherkhepshef (No. 55) and Tomb of Khaemwaset (No. 44).

    The chief tombs of the Valley of the Queens are those of Queen Nefertari, wife of Ramses II (closed for restoration)

    Admission ticket 20 EGP

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    Tomb #44 Khaemwaset, Part II

    by atufft Updated Jan 8, 2007

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    Prince and Pharoah
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    If you didn't read the notes for Part I of this series, I recommend that you do so. These are more images of the tomb and Valley of the Queens. Note in this photo of the young prince the transparency of the cotton clothes he wears, revealing an excellence in fine weaving in this ancient time. Again, sorry for the darkness of these images that were taken with the dim flourescent lighting found in the tomb.

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  • Valley of the Queens

    by Mark_Harris Updated Jul 29, 2003

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    Tomb of Khaemwesret

    The Valley of the Queens is much smaller than the Valley of the Kings with only a handful of tombs open to the public.

    Tickets:
    A single ticket covers entry to all the tombs, except one...

    Tickets to Nefertari`s beautifully restored tomb must be bought seperately. In December 2000 these cost LE200 and were limited to just 100 tickets a day. You`ll need to be at the ticket office before it opens around 6:00 to stand any chance of getting a ticket as most are taken by tour groups.

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    Valley of the Queens

    by Blatherwick Written Mar 19, 2005

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    Valley of the Queens

    The Valley of the Queens is the site of over 90 tombs of royal wives, sons, and daughters from the 18th, 19th, and 20th Dynasties. The tombs are elaborately decorated and at times are better than the ones in the Valley of the Kings as there are far less people.

    The most sought-after ticket in the valley is the tomb of Queen Nefertari. This is supposed to be the most beautiful tomb in the valley but it was closed to the public when I went there. In fact, only 3 of the tombs were open so I didn't have much choice in what I would see with my 3 tomb ticket (20 LE). I first saw the Tomb of Prince Khaemwaset and then the Tomb of Queen Titi.

    The best tomb included on this ticket was that of Prince Amunherkhopshef, who was Ramses III's son. He died at the age of 15 . His tomb is well decorated and you can even see a mummified fetus there.

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    Valley of the Queens

    by MM212 Updated Feb 25, 2008

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    Valley of the Queens

    Situated to the south of the Valley of the Kings, the Valley of the Queens was first used as a burial place for some princes and members of the royal family during the 18th Dynasty. It wasn't until the Ramesside period that this valley became the chosen burial place for the wives of the Pharaohs, most notably Queen Nefertari. Although smaller and less elaborate than the Valley of the Kings, the tombs are nevertheless impressive. Only three tombs are open to visitors, so this valley is usually skipped by tour groups, making it a much more pleasant experience than the overcrowded Valley of the Kings. Further details can be found on my separate page on the Necropolis of Thebes.

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    Valley of the Queens

    by Sambawalk Written May 28, 2006

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    Valley of Queens
    1 more image

    Although there are about 75 tombs in the valley of the Queens, only 2 were opened at time of my visit (May 2006). They areTomb of Amunherkhepshef (No. 55) and Tomb of Khaemwaset (No. 44) . The Tomb of Nefertari was closed. Those tombs are clorful and stunning.

    You can get the history from your travel guide books. Practically, you need to bring hat, umbrella and sunscreen and it is oven hot.

    Admission ticket 20 EGP (May 2006). You can only puchase on the site, NOT at the central ticket office near the Colossi of Memnon.

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    Day 3 Afternoon: Valley of the Queens

    by Q-Man Updated Aug 26, 2007

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    2 more images

    Here it's best to go to the Tomb of Amunherkhepshef (No 55). It's considered the best tomb before the Tomb of Nefertari was discovered. However, that tomb was closed to the public for restoration and I have no idea when it'll be opened. Here, you'll discover that the styles of the wall paintings and colors are quite different from the Tombs of the Nobles.
    There are 2 other tombs available for viewing: Khaemwaset (No 44) and Titi (No 52).

    I actually liked the the Tombs of the Nobles better than the Queens. I found the paintings depicting everyday life to be more interesting from a peasant perspective. At this point if you haven't gotten tired of tomb exploring, go to the Valley of the Kings. We opted not to go since we had an idea that it was going to be more of the same. We also knew that we would encounter more interesting sites on our upcoming cruise.

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