Mosques and islamic sites, Alexandria

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  • Abu el-Abbas el-Mursi Mosque in Mosque Square
    Abu el-Abbas el-Mursi Mosque in Mosque...
    by freddie18
  • Abu el-Abbas el-Mursi Mosque in Mosque Square
    Abu el-Abbas el-Mursi Mosque in Mosque...
    by freddie18
  • Abu el-Abbas el-Mursi Mosque in Mosque Square
    Abu el-Abbas el-Mursi Mosque in Mosque...
    by freddie18
  • xaver's Profile Photo

    Abu al Abbas Mosque

    by xaver Written Jan 6, 2013

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    The The Abu al-Abbas al-Mursi Mosque was originally built by algerians in the 1775, it was built over the tomb of the thirteenth century Murcia Andalusan saint.
    but since then it has been renovated many times, last renovation dates back to 1943.
    Women cannot visit inside the Mosque but can view the mausoleum and see the mosque from behind a barrer, for my personal experience I can say this rule is not so strictly observed.

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Islamic Architecture

    by mikey_e Written Aug 13, 2011
    Mosque by Raml Station at dusk
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    Alexandria may be famous for its Greek and Roman heritage, but the city has long been a place of Muslim culture and tradition. The vast majority of the city's residents are Muslims and the awqaf is quite influential here, with more than a few projects to build large mosques in various parts of the city. Egyptian Islamic architecture is quite interesting, and differs from what can be seen in Turkey, the Persian Gulf, the Magreb and the sub-Continent. Egyptians were very close to their Arab brothers in the Levant, and the influence of Syrian architectural styles can be seen very clearly in the tall, thin but rounded minarets, and the intricate patterns of that adorn the buildings. Visitors are generally welcome inside mosques, but it is important to remember to be respectful of Islamic tradition. Women should cover themselves completely with a cloak, and men should wear pants and at least a t-shirt.

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  • mikey_e's Profile Photo

    Sidi Bishr Mosque

    by mikey_e Written Aug 13, 2011
    Sidi Bishr Mosque
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    I'm not sure that the Sidi Bishr Mosque is terribly historical or of any great importance, but it is a structure that is quite imposing as you go along the Corniche. Sidi Bishr is the largest neighbourhood in the city and was established as a summering area for the wealthy prior to the 1952 Revolution. This particular mosque is a massive structure adorned with various religious verses on its exterior. In the small parkette out front, there is an interesting small gazebo with a fountain.

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  • TheLongTone's Profile Photo

    Mosque of Abu al-Abbas al-Mursi

    by TheLongTone Updated Jan 11, 2010

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    A prominent landmark on the Corniche about halfway between the downtown area and the fortress of Quait Bey, the present structure was built in 1938 to designs by an Italian architect. To me it has an air of romantic faux-orientalism that reminds me irresistibly of the Royal Pavilion in Brighton

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  • freddie18's Profile Photo

    Abu el-Abbas el-Mursi Mosque in Alexandria

    by freddie18 Written Dec 27, 2008

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    Abu el-Abbas el-Mursi Mosque in Mosque Square
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    Very historic and a beautiful mosque. This Andalusian-style mosque is the largest in the city situated in Al-Anfushi on Mosque Square overlooking the eastern harbour. It has four domes and a very tall minaret.

    Facts about the mosque;
    - Founded 1307; rebuilt many times; present building dates from 1775; substantially renovated 1943
    - Area: 3,000 sq m; outer walls: 23 m high; ceilings: 17.2 m high; minaret: 73 m high; minbar: 6.35 m high
    - Woman cannot visit the mosque itself, but can visit the mausolem and view the interior of the mosque from behind a barrier.

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  • viddra's Profile Photo

    The Mosque of Abu al-Abbas al-Mursi

    by viddra Updated Jan 13, 2008

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    This lace-like mosque is the biggest and probably the most wonderful in Alexandria, if not in the whole Egypt. Just take a few moments to admire its many details!

    The mosque was originally built in 1775, and dedicated to the Andalusian saint Ahmed Abu al-Abbas. Thus the name. In 1943 the four domes and a minaret were added.

    Inside the mosque there is a colonnade and eight granite columns.

    Tourists can visit most of the mosques in Alexandria, but they should dress modestly and women must cover their heads with a headscarf. As for the mosque of Mursi Abul Abbas, women can only visit one of its side rooms. Remember to leave your shoes at the entry (you’ll get a piece of paper with a number) and collect them on your way out by making a donation (usually 1 Egyptian pound).

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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Abu El-Abbas Mosque

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Written Dec 9, 2007

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    Alexandria - Abu El-Abbas Mosque

    Abu El Abbas El Mursi is considered one of the most important historic mosques in Alexandria and Egypt as well. It was constructed in 1775 by Algerians, over the tomb of the thirteenth century Murcia Andalusan saint, Ahmed Abu al-Abbas al-Mursi (Abu'l 'Abbas).
    The cream-colored Abu al-Abbas al-Mursi Mosque stands 23 m high and dressed in artificial stone, with a minaret on the southern side rising to 73 m.

    It is situated on Midan el Masaged (Mosque Square) near the shore of the eastern harbor. The minaret has an Ayoubids design, with four sections of different shapes. The mosque has an entrance on the north and one on the east, both of which overlook the square. The main part of the mosque is an octagon, with internal walls are dressed in artificial stone.

    Woman cannot visit the mosque itself, but can visit the mausolem and view the interior of the mosque from behind a barrier.

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  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    Mosque of Abu Abbas al-Mursi

    by MalenaN Updated Oct 20, 2005

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    Mosque of Abu Abbas al-Mursi in Alexandria
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    The white colour of the Mosque of Abu Abbas al-Mursi looks beautiful against the blue sky. It is situated in the area Anfushi, in the middle of the square, not too far from the Cornish. It is absolutely worth taking a closer look at the mosque. The mosque was built in the 1940s, but before there had been a mosque there since the 13th century.

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  • maykal's Profile Photo

    El-Attareen Mosque

    by maykal Written Dec 29, 2004

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    El Attareen Mosque, Alexandria

    If you walk along the Corniche towards Fort Qaitbey, you can't miss the huge mosque of El Attareen. It lies in an impressive square full of palm trees, and is one of the more beautiful buildings in downtown Alexandria. I would have gone in, but my travel companion told me it was coffee and chicha time. Around the mosque are several narrow lanes forming the old quarters of Alexandria. Unfortunately, there is not much left, in comparison with Cairo or other Egyptian cities, but you can come across an overhanging Ottoman house or a quiet backstreet cafe if you are determined. The souqs also begin near here...a very good area to get lost in.

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  • kenmerk's Profile Photo

    Abu Abbas al-Mursi Mosque Interior.

    by kenmerk Written Jan 3, 2004

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    Mosque Dome Interior Decor

    You are welcome to go inside the Mosque and have a look around. The decor is quite ornate, especially the interior of the main dome of the Mosque.

    Just check your shoes at the front door and head in. Note: both men and women are welcome, but must enter through separate door. (men through the main front door, and women through the doors around on the left side of the Mosque.)

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  • kenmerk's Profile Photo

    Abu Abbas al-Mursi Mosque

    by kenmerk Written Jan 3, 2004

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    Abu Abbas Al-Mursi Mosque

    The many mosque minarets that line the Alexandria skyline are quite picturesque, and the Abu Abbas al-Mursi Mosque down by the waterfront is no exception.

    It was built over the sight where a 13th century saint is buried.

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  • GerryFM's Profile Photo

    The Mosque of Abu al-Abbas al-Mursi

    by GerryFM Written Nov 13, 2003

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    The Mosque of Abu al-Abbas al-Mursi

    This beautiful mosque, with its high minaret and four domes, is Alexandria's largest and one of the most important Islamic monuments.

    In 1775 the Algerians built the mosque over the tomb of the thirteenth century Andalusan saint Ahmed Abu al-Abbas al-Mursi who had joined and then lead the Shadhali brotherhood. The interior is made up of eight monolithic granite columns and a colonnade of elongated arches.

    It was rebuilt in 1943 with the domes and the towering (73 meter) minaret. It is one of Alexandria's foremost religious buildings and women are not allowed inside the mosque proper, but may only visit a room at the back of the mosque

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  • dedeckerm.'s Profile Photo

    The Mosque of Abu al-Abbas

    by dedeckerm. Updated Sep 8, 2002

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    The Mosque of Abu al-Abbas al-Mursi

    The Mosque of Abu al-Abbas al-Mursi
    This beautiful mosque, with its high minaret and four domes, is Alexandria's largest and one of the most important Islamic monuments.
    The interior is made up of eight monolithic granite columns.
    It was rebuilt in 1943 with the domes and the towering (73 meter) minaret.
    It is one of Alexandria's foremost religious buildings and women are not allowed inside the mosque proper, but may only visit a room at the back of the mosque

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  • Hanoon's Profile Photo

    Islamic Era Monuments in...

    by Hanoon Written Aug 25, 2002

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    Islamic Era Monuments in Alexandria


    The Attarine Mosque

    Fort Qaitbey (The Citadel of Qaitbey)

    The Mosque of Abu al-Abbas al-Mursi

    The Mostafa Kamel Graveyard

    The Muntazah Complex

    The Shatby Tomb

    Terbana Mosque

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  • stevemt's Profile Photo

    Mosques

    by stevemt Written Apr 25, 2010

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    There are numerous mosques in Alexandria, all seem welcoming to visitors, assuming that it is not prayer time of course.

    I visited one and took outside snaps of another

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