museums, Alexandria

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  • Mosaics
    Mosaics
    by K.Knight
  • Statues
    Statues
    by K.Knight
  • The Alexandria National Museum.
    The Alexandria National Museum.
    by K.Knight
  • Alexandria National Museum

    by HRChavez Written Nov 6, 2011

    Visited the museum as part of a tour group, and as a museum professional I was keen to see the exhibits and the museum layout. The museum itself is impressive from the outside, being as it was originally an early 20th century palace built for a wealthy merchant, and the exhibits are on three floors. The objects are well-chosen but unimaginatively exhibited, although the state-of-the-art cases use the limited space well. But by the time I'd been marched around the exhibits being lectured by a guide, I was beginning to lose the will to live. I peeled off and did my own thing (which made the guide very unhappy) and finally got to study and enjoy the beautiful collections in my own time, even though I was surrounded by numerous crocodiles of weary tourists being herded around the cases and lectured by their very loud guides, who had to shout to make themselves heard above the din. Maybe it was just 'tourist day' in the museum, but it would put anyone off from going back - it certainly did for me. If you go, go as an independent visitor, I'm sure you'll get much more from the visit.

    Also, if you're wheelchair-bound, don't bother - tiny lift, daunting entry, and labels not very accessible. It's a museum made for political statement, and to educate and enthrall everyone interested in the history of Alexandria, this museum needs to be more involving and accessible.

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  • K.Knight's Profile Photo

    The Alexandria National Museum - 3.

    by K.Knight Updated Nov 11, 2009

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    Statues
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    Alexandria was a Greco-Roman city and the museum is now home to many artifacts and relics of these days gone by.

    The attached 3 photographs depict a few of the items that feature in the roman section of the Alexandria National Museum.

    1. Statues – Carved from one piece of stone, this well proportioned carving depicts a lady resting on a day bed. Her hair is “perfect” and her flowing gown gives me the idea that she was some type of Roman Royalty.

    2. Artifacts of war – A helmet with mesh protecting the back of the neck, ears and the head must have been very heavy to wear.

    3. Mosaics – Although this specimen is broken, the picture in the middle of this mosaic is striking. Two different colored eyes are staring at the snake that seems to coming from his right ear.

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  • K.Knight's Profile Photo

    The Alexandria National Museum - 5.

    by K.Knight Written Nov 11, 2009

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    Statue of the purification priest.
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    Statue of the purification priest.

    This statue of a purification priest, dated to approx 2500 B.C. is carved from timber.
    It possesses the most amazing eyes that seem to be popping right out of his head…as if he has just found out that there is no after life!

    The priest is represented with one foot in front of the other and he has a dagger in one hand and a staff in the other.

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  • K.Knight's Profile Photo

    The Alexandria National Museum - 4.

    by K.Knight Updated Nov 11, 2009

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    The head of Hatshepsut.

    At the Alexandria National Museum there is an excellent carving of the head of Hatshepsut, great female pharaoh of Egypt.

    After she married her half brother, Thutmose II, she began to plan how she rule Egypt.

    When Thutmose II eventually died, his son (Thutmose III,) was the actual heir to the throne. Hatshepsut wrangled her way in and she was appointed regent because Thutmose III was considered too young to rule As a result Hatshepsut and Thutmose III ruled jointly until Hatshepsut declared herself pharaoh a few years later.

    She spent her remaining days dressing like a man and wearing a “stick on” beard of the Pharaoh!,

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  • K.Knight's Profile Photo

    The Alexandria National Museum - 2.

    by K.Knight Written Nov 11, 2009

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    My old mate Horus.

    Although this sandstone statue is broken, the statue of the Falcon God Horus was once wearing the crown of both Upper and Lower Egypt.

    The myth is that Osrisis was a King who is best known for teaching the Egyptians how to live, and more importantly, how to grow corn. In fact, he is said to have told all Egyptians to worship corn.

    Horus’s Uncle Seth murdered his brother and cut the body up, scattering his body parts all over Egypt. Osrisis’s wife, Isis, collected all of the body parts and put them all back together forming the very first mummy in Egypt. Isis the used her magic to bring the mummy back to life and they conceived a son, Horus.

    Osrisis then joined the underworld and became judge of the dead while Horus went on to avenge his father by fighting the fierce battle with Seth.

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  • K.Knight's Profile Photo

    The Alexandria National Museum.

    by K.Knight Written Nov 11, 2009

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    The Alexandria National Museum.
    1 more image

    President Hosni Mubarak inaugurated the Alexandria National Museum in 2003.

    Located in a beautiful ex palace, (Al-Saad Bassili Pasha Palace) which later became the US Embassy before being sold to the Egyptian government, this is quite a small museum….but it is air-conditioned!

    The artifacts and displays here represent the ages of the Time of the Pharaohs through to the Roman and Coptic periods.

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  • Tijavi's Profile Photo

    Alexandria National Museum

    by Tijavi Written Aug 10, 2007

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    Bust of Akhenaten
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    The Alexandria National Museum is one of the city's latest initiatives to improve its tourist image and capitalize on the millions of visitors that visit Egypt's ancient sites. But unlike Luxor's little great museum and the overwhelming Egyptian Museum in Cairo, this one empasizes Alexandria's Hellenic heritage with a sprinkiling of exhibits from the Pharaonic, Ottoman and Islamic periods.

    Sort of reflecting its ambition to be one of the leading museums in Egypt, the museum is housed in grand style - in a beautifully renovated palace, the Al-Saad Bassili Pasha Palace (formerly owned by a wealthy merchant). The palace itself is surrounded by sprawling gardens.

    Beyond these grand surroundings, the exhibits are done well with dramatic lighting (in many cases) and professional labeling. My favorite exhibits were the sculptured heads of Akhenaten (in the picture) and the mosaic tiles from the Hellenic period. The classical Greek sculptures were also a treat.

    Entrance fee as of May 2007: EGP 30

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  • sswagner's Profile Photo

    Alexandria National Museum

    by sswagner Written Jul 13, 2006
    Alexandria National Museum

    This relatively new museum contains treasures from Pharaonic, Greco-Roman, Coptic, and Islamic times. It is housed in an elegant building. At the time of our visit, the Greco-Roman museum was closed, so this was a good place to see. Photos are allowed inside, however a flash cannot be used. Chronologically, the oldest exhibits are in the basement, and as the timeline continues, you go higher up into the building.

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  • coold3a's Profile Photo

    Best Place to Visit [ ancient gods and godesses ]

    by coold3a Updated Apr 7, 2006
    Isis
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    Courier New
    If you are a big fan of ancient Egypt
    and ancient Cultures like roman and Greek

    a must see place
    is the roman and Greek museum

    my love to the gods and goddesses of ancient Egypt
    is the cause that made me recommend this subject

    when u see Isis and Venus statues ... you will know why :) !
    the link i ve post down is from my blog

    the photos isnt mine is from other site

    http://www.delange.org/Greek_Roman_Museum/EP6.htm
    Thank You

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  • Jannoo's Profile Photo

    Witness the Fine Arts Museum

    by Jannoo Updated Mar 15, 2006

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    Front of Alexandria Museum

    This museum is literally small but sufficient for the city like Alexander. Can't compare with the Cairo Museum but here photos are allowed inside :)

    It contains sculptural, architectural and photographical works presented by contemporary Egyptians and foreign artists. The museum organises the Alexandrias Biennial, to exhibit the art of the Mediterranean countries.

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  • balint01's Profile Photo

    Alexandria National Museum

    by balint01 Updated Nov 10, 2005

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    Mummy
    3 more images

    In the time of our visit (late October, 2005) our tour guide gave us the information that the Greek-Roman Museum is closed for restoration for about a planned 2 (!) years. Thus she showed us the Alexandria National Museum.

    We found this museum very interesting, as it includes the local findings from all the different ages from the vicinity of Alexandria. It guides through all the Egyptian Historical Periods: Old Kingdom, Middle Kingdom, New Kingdom, Greek times, Roman times, Muslim times and Modern times while showing a lot of interesting pieces.

    For us this was the first Egyptian Museum, I believe if You have already seen the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, it would be of moderate interest to You. But there is one big advantage: YOU ARE FREE TO TAKE PICTURES!!

    Costs EGP 30 to enter for tourists.

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  • MalenaN's Profile Photo

    National Museum of Alexandria

    by MalenaN Updated Nov 1, 2005

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    Mummie cases at the National Museum of Alexandria
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    The third day I was in Alexandria I had planed to visit the Graeco Roman Museum, but during breakfast I was told there was a new, very good museum, which was not mentioned in most of the guide books jet. I decided to go there instead, to the National Museum of Alexandria, and I liked it very much.
    The museum is housed in the old Bassili Pasha Palace on Fouad Street (Tariq al-Horreyya) and has impressive historic artifacts from different periods of Egyptian history. On the ground floor (basement) there is an exhibition showing things from Phoraonic period. On the first floor are artifacts from the Graeco - Roman period, and some of the items found during the archaeological underwater excavations in Alexandria. On the second floor are exhibitions of Coptic and Islamic Egypt.
    The artifacts are displayed in a good way with signs and texts to read.
    Entrance fee is 30 pounds (July 2005).

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  • sarrahh's Profile Photo

    MUSEUM OF ALEXANDRIA

    by sarrahh Written May 9, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    MUSUEM

    More than 1800 archaeological pieces are exhibited chronologically from one floor to the next: the basement is devoted to Prehistoric and Pharonic times; first floor to the Graeco-Roman period; second floor to the Coptic and Islamic era that highlights artifacts raised during recent underwater excavations.
    Attraction type: History museum

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  • sayedaburas's Profile Photo

    The Greek Deity

    by sayedaburas Updated May 3, 2005

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    Greek god Zeus / Jupiter

    Ancient Greeks worshipped Zeus, and considered him the father of all their gods.

    The photo is part of a msterpiece bronze statue at Athens. Some think that it may be sea god Poseidon.

    Yes, I can feel yor inquiry...!?*

    Guess! Why is this mentioned here, now?

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  • sayedaburas's Profile Photo

    Transparent Stone!

    by sayedaburas Updated Apr 30, 2005

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    goddess ....

    Guess!

    Do you need a clue? It was one of the submerged monuments at Abu Qir Gulf!!*

    Let me help!

    Isis is one of the most important goddesses in ancient Egyptian religion. She was the goddess of love and the symbol of devotion as a wife and mother. She was the goddess of maternity, and protector of mother and child.She was worshipped all over Egypt,

    Headless statue of a woman (probably the goddess Isis), in a striding posture, in which the left leg is advanced. She is dressed in a transperent garment that accentuates the beauty of her body. The dress is tied on the left shoulder in a knot. The right arm is stretched along the side of the body and the hand is missing. The feet are also missing.

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