Memphis Travel Guide

  • Statue of Ramses II
    Statue of Ramses II
    by Bavavia
  • Step pyramid of Zoser
    Step pyramid of Zoser
    by Bavavia
  • Memphis
    by Bavavia

Memphis Highlights

  • Pro
    DSwede profile photo

    DSwede says…

     Seeing the statues still in the quarries will give you perception of the tasks they ancients overcame. 

  • Con
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    DSwede says…

     Outside of the quarries, there is not much more to do. 

  • In a nutshell
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    DSwede says…

     An easy and recommended half-day trip from Cairo. 

Memphis Things to Do

  • Artwork in mastaba (tomb)

    Mastaba is a type of ancient Egyptian tomb in the form of a flat roof rectangular building. This was standard type of tomb in pre-dynastic and early dynastic Egypt for pharaoh and the social elite.Inside Mastaba you may find fascinate artwork.

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  • Saqqara Necropolis Visit

    Saqqara was necropolis for the Ancient Egyptian capital Memphis. Pyramid of Djoser (step pyramid) is weel known. This first Egyptian pyramid consisted of six mastabas.

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  • Ramses II

    Ramses IIHe is often regarded as Egypt's greatest, most celebrated, and most powerful pharaoh.[6] His successors and later Egyptians called him the "Great Ancestor".He was born around 1303 BC[citation needed] and at age fourteen, Ramesses was appointed Prince Regent by his father Seti I.[6] He is believed to have taken the throne in his early 20s...

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  • Mit Rahina Museum

    It's hard to believe that Memphis was once the capital of ancient Egypt when you pass through the tiny village of Mit Rahina today. The only thing here is the museum, which currently houses a colossal statue of Ramses II, and it's garden containing several other pieces of statuary.It costs 30LE to enter, and unless you're visiting as part of a...

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  • The Statue of Ramesses II

    This limestone statue is one of the statues found near the temple of Ptah, near Memphis. It probably stood in front of the temple of Ramses II. The statue was moved to the museum in Memphis as it was found. Ramesses II not only had more colossal statues than any other pharaoh but he had also inscribed his own cartouche on many already existing...

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  • Mit Rahina - Museum

    Little is left of the ancient city of Memphis today, at least of what can be seen. Evidently the city had many fine temples and palaces. But today most of the city is gone, only a few scattered ruins remains.This open-air museum is believed to be the remains of the grand temple of Ptah which at one time was the biggest temple in Egypt. A massive...

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  • Mit Rihena

    If you have time after visiting Saqqarah, stop at Mit Rihena, the site of Memphis where there is a 'museum. It is just an area with a few statues and other objects, but what makes it worthwhile is seeing the enormous statue of Rameses II. Although damaged, it is still awe-inspiring.The fee to enter is exhorbitant for what it is, but ....

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  • Alabaster Sphinx (aka Calcite Sphinx)

    Most probably the Alabaster Sphinx dates back to the 18th dynasty. It is not know in honor of which pharaoh it was carved, maybe of Hatshepsut, Amenhotept II or Amenhotept III. It is thoght that the sphinx stood near the Temple of Ptah.The Alabaster Sphinx is 8m long, 4m tall and weights 80 tons which makes it the biggest calcite statue ever found.

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  • Ramses II

    Like most ancient sites in Egypt, there are ruins and statues. But in Memphis, the highlight is the unfinished statue of Ramses II.

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Memphis Restaurants

  • illumina's Profile Photo

    by illumina Written Apr 1, 2008

    There is a little cafe across the road from the museum entrance - they serve tea, soft drinks and i think fruit juices as well. We didn't drink here, although our taxi driver did, and I'm sure the prices are over inflated for the tourists - we took our own food and drink, and I suggest you take plenty of water.

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Memphis Transportation

  • Private Taxi

    As far as I know, it is possible to visit Memphis by public transport but it's difficult and time-consuming. We came as part of a day-trip to Dahshur, Saqqara and Giza, and paid 220LE for the taxi and driver for the whole day, through our hotel.

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  • Taxi

    I decided not to use public transportation to see the different pyramids outside Cairo (Dahshur is not easy to reach by public transport), but to pay for a car with driver. I asked at the travel agent, which is open a few hours a day at Garden City House Hotel. There was no one to chare the price with so finally I went alone. For the transport to...

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  • Memphis Hotels

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Memphis Shopping

  • fonden's Profile Photo

    by fonden Updated Apr 26, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    What to buy: Make sure to try the local fruit in Egypt while you're there. We bought the most delicious clementines I've ever tasted while we were in Memphis. You can buy it just right of the street. So sweet and yummy!

    What to pay: Not much. They will probably rip you off though. But it's still cheap ;)

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Memphis Favorites

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    Alabaster Sphinx

    by windoweb Written Apr 20, 2010

    Favorite thing: Near the remains of Memphis stands the Alabaster Sphinx. The Alabaster Sphinx was carved in honor of an unknown Pharaoh most likely during the eighteenth dynasty, between 1700 and 1400 BC. Although there was not an inscription, the facial features suggest that it was in honor of Hatshepsut or Amenhotep II or Amenhotep III. Amenhotep III is thought to be the builder of the Luxor Temple.

    Fondest memory: The Alabaster Sphinx is 8m (26 ft) long and 4m (13 ft) tall and weighs around 90 tons. It has corroded over the centuries, but remains very impressive. This monument may have stood outside of the Temple of Ptah along with the Colossus of Ramses II. The Alabaster Sphinx spent many years lying on its side in water. This was responsible for the damage to the surface of the monument.

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