Unique Places in Cairo

  • Eating and Drinking
    by machomikemd
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by machomikemd
  • Eating and Drinking
    by machomikemd

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Cairo

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    Watching the Cairo Sunset

    by machomikemd Written Oct 25, 2013

    Watching the Sunset in Cairo while in the tour bus is a pleasent experience as we were able to take pictures of the sun setting and with the aid of our powerful optical zoom cameras, we were able to have the sunset among some of the buidlings and part of the pyramids and a mosque while the bus was moving. you don't need a DLSR camera to get nice pictures.

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    Mass at St. Joseph Cathedral

    by machomikemd Written Oct 23, 2013

    as this is the last day of our holyland pilgrimage and with egypt as the last stop, we had our last mass at the Roman Catholic St. Joseph Cathedral in the Center of Old Cairo, along the embassy row and european part of Cairo, which is the seat of the Roman Catholic (Latin Rite) Church of Egypt. we had an appointment for the holy mass at the diocese and celebrated mass at the back end of the cathedral.

    They have regular roman catholic sunday masses:

    Weekend Mass Times

    Sunday
    7:30 AM
    8:30 AM
    10:00 AM
    6:30 PM

    address: 2 Bank Misr at corner of Muhammad Farid, Cairo Egypt

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    Franciscan Missionary Sisters Monastery

    by machomikemd Written Oct 23, 2013

    the Franciscan Missionary Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary is a Roman Catholic Religious Order, founded in Cairo, Egypt in 1868 by Blessed Mary Catherine Troiani, O.S.F and is one of the few Roman Catholic Monastery and Cloisterhood in Islamic Egypt. the monastery is located in Old Cairo and near an elevated ring road and hosts a cloister of Nuns, a chapel and a small school for students. this is where we had one of our daily masses as egypt was the last leg of our Pilgrimage after all.

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    Franciscan Missionary Sisters Monastery Chapel

    by machomikemd Written Oct 23, 2013

    since we were visiting Egypt as part of a holyland pilgrimage, instead of a regular religious tour, we have masses daily in different churches in the middle east during our pilgrimage and here in cairo, we had our first mass at the Monastery of the Franciscan Missionary Sister of the Immaculate heart of Mary in the center of Cairo. The Monastery was founded in 1868 by the religious order of the Franciscan Missionary Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary and it has a chapel inside the compound where you can have mass.

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    Outskirts of Cairo

    by croisbeauty Written Apr 8, 2012

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    There is no big difference in between outskirts of Cairo, Tunis or Nairobi, all are alike and looking pretty much poor. Chaotic slums densed very close to each other with no infrastructure at all. But no matter poor life conditions this people still smile and sending friendly salutes. Egypt, however, is predominatelly men's world, women whom one could meet out on the streets always rushing and never looking other people into the face, with exception of small girls.

    donkey carriage graveyard outskirts of Cairo finaly Cairo

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    Day trip from Hurghada

    by croisbeauty Written Apr 8, 2012

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    We departured with the bus at 3AM in the morning from Hurghada and I slept till the day light. I snaped this pictures from the bus, soon after awaking, and have no idea where exactly this is. Countryside looks poor and pretty much neglected.

    Random picture snaped from the bus

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    Church Of Virgin Mary And Saint Samaan The Tanner

    by dplesko Updated Feb 4, 2012

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    In commemoration of the miracle of transferring the Moqattam Hill on the 27th of November 979, where the Lord used ST.Simon the Tanner to fulfill this miracle in the Era of Pope Abram, place is named Church Of Virgin Mary And Saint Samaan The Tanner

    During this time after praying and fasting for three days in the church of Virgin Mary in Old Egypt, Virgin Mary has made her revelation to pope Abram to announce upon whosew hands the transference of the hill would take place.

    To visit this place I had local driver and guide. We went trough slam ant that was also unforgetable experience.

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    Attaba and Abdel Aziz Street

    by June.b Written Jul 3, 2011

    So one day I took the metro train and got off at Attaba station and from there I walk my way passing by the AlAzhar bridge, went under it and found my way along Abdel Aziz Street. I know it's not very far from the city centre but this place is out of the usual tourist beaten path. In fact I've never seen a single tourist, that I get this look from people all the time like I'm getting lost or something.

    This street has a lot of art-deco buildings, more like the ones in Paris but in acid wash, and they look kind of nostalgic. The buildings are similar to the Yacoubian Building in Talaat Harb street - made popular by the Egyptian movie of the same title (I recommend watching this movie if you're coming to Cairo, or read the novel where the movie was adopted from, also same title).

    Along Abdel Aziz Street are several shops - electronics, household items, etc. This is one those those real-Cairo kind of atmosphere. Chaotic, but not touristic at all.

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    A toothache will not end your trip

    by Saladinos Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    If you are attacked by a tooth ache while in cairo, dont panic Egyptian dentists are proffessionals and not very greedy as in Europe or USA.
    I have included my own endodontist who happened to be a school friend of mine also.
    I prefered Dr. Hazem cause he is honest and he is implementing a strict infection control measures in his work. He is reasonable when coming to cash time. He speaks fluent English as well. Call to reserve.

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    Fayoum Portraits.

    by TheLongTone Updated Jan 29, 2010

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    Coptic Cairo, Khan el Khalil, the Pyramids for the love of grud, are offered as options when you hit 'off the beaten path' but not the Egyptian museum, which has a very well beaten path in it and myriad byways. A legendary barely-labelled labyrinth, it contains hidden and neglected masterpieces.

    The ' FAYOUM PORTRAITS are not only a bit off the beaten path within the museum: they are also off the beaten path of cultural history. Funerary portraits from the Roman era, they are on the outer fringes of Egyptology: too late, too Roman. And from the point of view of a Graeco-Roman classicist, they are Egyptology. But these paintings represent a remarkable survival of the tradition of Greek naturalistic painting from the age of the Apelles. of which little remains.

    They are, simply, breathtaking.

    Largely executed in a technique called encaustic, involving the use of pigment mixed with hot wax, these paintings have a sense of the personality of the subject as vivid as any portrait of the renaissance and after European tradition. The technique does not allow the blending of colour wet into wet as does oil: rather the modelling of the features is achieved using small blocks of finely differentiated skin-tones, as Cezanne or Monet might have done. And using an unbelievably limited palette: a couple of blacks, white, and varieties of ochre.

    Unlit behind dusty glass, some virtually at floor level....deary deary me. In one of the side -rooms on the upper floor at the King Tut end.

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    Tangentially about bridges.

    by TheLongTone Updated Jan 29, 2010

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    The Egyptian Railway Museum

    Worth a detour for diehard train-freaks or connoisseurs of decaying museums, and otherwise entertaining if you have some time to kill in the vicinity of Ramses station.
    I was actually rather taken by this museum. It's ramshackle and unless you're a railway enthusiast there's really only one thing there that's particularly extraordinary, but it certainly doesn't lack atmosphere. And although entry was a comparatively exorbitant 20 LE (double because it was Friday) I did get an entire museum to myself, dusty models of (seemingly) every station between Alex and Aswan, engravings of impressive examples of French bridge design, and some models of airliners. Courtesy of British Imperial Airways, to give you an idea of their vintage.

    The star exhibit is a gorgeous and bizarre little steam loco thingy. constructed for some Pasha or other (nothing is labelled). Completely Roland Emmett, with a brass steam-dome ribbed like a mameluke mausoleum and an intricate ottoman- style paint job, it consists simply of the steam engine and working platform and behind, on the same chassis and where you'd expect some coal and water, a little wood panelled luxury passenger compartment. Completely useless for actually pulling anything: it must have been accompanied by a bevy of fellaheen busy heaving baskets of fuel onto the footplate.

    It's part of the main station building, at the end away from all the hoohah.
    10 LE to get in, unless it's Friday when it's a whopping 20 LE. I don't think they charged me the 10LE for a camera, though.

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    Grey Pillars - No. 10 Tolombat St, Garden City

    by MM212 Updated Dec 16, 2009

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    Although seemingly just another Belle Epoque building in Garden City, the no. 10 Tolombat Street hides plenty of interesting history. It was known as "Grey Pillars" and nicknamed "Number 10" during World War II, when the British Army officials chose to make it their headquarters. Through these elegant gates, many historic figures have walked: Charles de Gaulle, Oliver Lyttleton, Chaim Weizmann and Anthony Eden, to name a few. It is said that in 1941, de Gaulle and Lyttleton negotiated the independence of Syria and Lebanon in this very building. Today, the charitable organisation "Save the Children" occupies the building. Although still referred to as Tolombat, the street's name was changed recently to the mouthful "Itihad el Mohameyeen el Arab Street".

    Grey Pillars Belle Epoque Details
    Related to:
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    • Historical Travel

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  • The Monastery of St. Simon

    by TTRefuge Written Mar 23, 2009

    Well worth a visit. It's hidden away in the Mokkattam Hills not too far from the Citadel and cut into the hills.
    The Monastery, located on the opposite side of the road leading to the Citadel contains seven Churches and Chapels hidden in a series of caves in the Mokattam (Muqattam) hills.
    The Monastery was erected and dedicated to him a thousand years after his miracle and his death. It lies behind "Mansheiyet Nasser", the Zabbalin village (garbage collectors) which is also worth a walk round.
    Best is to read the following web site for more details.

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    Smell and taste authentic Cairo

    by Heidelinde Updated Jan 8, 2009

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    Make a tour through the non touristy quarters . Enjoy a freshly pressed sugarcane juice and take a walk through the small streets and alleys, where you will meet donkeys, mules, goats, cats and dogs. You also can take a seat in one of the street cafes and smoke the waterpipe.
    Then the trip will bring you to Khan el Khalili - Egypt's most famous market. The market was built in 1382 by the Emir Djaharks el-Khalili in the heart of the Fatimid City. There you will watch a goldsmith and learn something about his work.
    The crowning end will be a delicious genuine dinner with an Egyptian family.

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    11 Champollion Street

    by MM212 Updated Jan 15, 2008

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    Take a walk down Champollion Street (number 11) and you will come across a magnificent Belle Epoque palace (see pictures) in a very sad state of decay. Broken windows and blackened façade, yet you can still see the beauty of the architecture and be able to imagine the palace during its glory days. I asked the locals about the palace and they knew it as a Nasriya School. When I tried to enter, the guard wouldn't let me in nor allow me to take pictures of the grand entrance. The palace was designed in 1899 by Antonio Lasciac for Prince Said Halim Pacha. Years later, the palace was converted in Nasriya School, considered one of the best in Cairo.

    Champollion Street is a quieter street parallel to some of the noisiest streets in downtown Cairo. It is not a street that one would typically have a reason to walk through, but is worth a diversion to see different things. The street is lined with beautiful trees and, for some reason, it seemed to hold many car repair shops and local bread bakeries (the bread is yummy and cheap!).

    An update: a great article was written about this palace. To read it, click here and choose "From Grand Vizier's Palace to Nassriya School" in the left hand column.

    Decaying fa��ade Details Champollion Street sign (ex-Mouillard St) The side of the palace Champollion Street is at the next intersection
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