Khan el Khalili, Cairo

4.5 out of 5 stars 82 Reviews

From Al Azher st.,Cairo

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  • Khan el Khalili
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  • Khan el Khalili
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  • Kuznetsov_Sergey's Profile Photo

    Khan el-Khalili Bazaar

    by Kuznetsov_Sergey Updated Nov 25, 2007

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    Cairo - Khan el-Khalili Bazaar
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    The Khan el-Khalili Bazaar is situated at one corner of a triangle of markets that go south to Bab Zuwayla and west to Azbakiyyah. The Khan is bordered on the south by al-Azhar Street and on the west by the Muski Market. It was established about the XV-th century on the site of a Fatimid castle, which has preserved its old world character, although the shops now cater for the tourist trade (carpets, jewelry, antiques, perfume, etc.).
    One of the old original gates guards the entrance to the original courtyard which lies midway down Sikkit al-Badistan (street).

    Egyptian buyers generally shop in the area north of al-Badistan and to the west, where prices may be lower. Better deals for gold and silver are to be found west of the Khan along the "street of the goldsellers", and further on one will find the Brass and Coppersmith Markets.

    You may watch my video-clip from my personal channel on YouTube: 5 min 52 sec Egypt Cairo Khan al-Khalili Bazaar 2007
    You may find the exact direction with my photos on my Google Earth Panoramio Khan el-Khalili Bazaar and Khan el-Khalili Bazaar and Mosque

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  • Cairo Traditional Market

    by pangtidor Updated Mar 12, 2007

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    Al Khalili Market
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    I have read many enthutiastic tips from other members about Al Khalili market in Cairo. That is why I was really surprised when the tour agent who plan my cairo trip discouraged me to go there. It won`t be a good place to visit on a raining day as it is an opened market. It is still a very interesting place for me to see such an arabic traditional market. My tour guide recommended me not to buy anything from there for the souvenirs as most of the things will be made in China not Egypt. I wonder why their government don`t try to do some renovation in AL-Khalili like good parking places and streets. Mud and water will be everywhere when it rains. It is a good example for the ancient arabic market actually. No matter what others said about Al-Khalili and no matter how hard your tour guide try to force you not to go there, YOU MUST SEE THIS PLACE. Though you may not buy anything, you will be excited to see all the activities in that market. If you want to buy something there, enhance your bargain skill.:-))

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    Fishawy Coffee Shop

    by Heavens-Mirror Updated Oct 16, 2005

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    Noura, Me & Hossam
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    Here is a photo of me & my friend Noura who i met in Cairo, i took her to Khan El Khalili during my visit as she has never been there before.
    We had a great night & went to the famous Fishawy Coffee Shop & smoked shisha & had pepsi & 7up. Her username on VT is EgyptianDiamond.

    It was very busy in Khan El Khalili during this time as it is Ramadan & everybody wants to have fun & party, the atmosphere is great.

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    Smell the Histroy of cairo

    by Saladinos Updated Oct 5, 2004

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    If you r in Cairo then you will not miss the khan el Khalili area in Al Hussien district.
    It use to be a center for commercial and trade interactions and the architecture of the place will show you this. Now it is still used for the same purpose but with different looks and type of goods.
    You will go shopping, walking, eating, drinking, smoking shisha and my favorite is watching the different groups of people coming from all over Egypt and abroad in this area.
    The mosques (Al Hussien) is one very important religious site for many Egyptians. They go there to pray and get the blessings of Al hussien who is the relative of the muslim prophet Mohammad.
    Due to the 100s of years of trade theat included herbs and essance, the place has its unique smell that you might get addicted to.

    Outside the mosques wear what you want but not very short so to avoid the parasetic touches of the kids and the big kids.
    If you are planning to visit the mosques where the shrine is inside, then make sure to wear conservative clothes under your knees and ladies should get a hair cover as a respect for the place.

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    Why do I love thee?

    by Tijavi Updated Jul 18, 2007

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    One of the Medieval Gates
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    I don't know why, but unlike Istanbul's Kapali Carsi (Grand Bazaar) which was clearly a tourist trap, I just fell in love with Khan el-Khalili, Cairo's (and arguably Egypt's) largest souk, which began as a small trading outpost in the 14th century A.D. Could it be the unpaved, dusty alleys lined with screaming hawkers? Or the colorful spice souks and the atmospheric ahwas (coffeehouses) filled with tourists and locals alike? Or is it simply the fact that most of the rough and tumble trade that goes on here are genuine, day-to-day activities carried out by the locals themselves in contrast to the contrived, mainly-for-tourist atmosphere that was characteristic of Kapali Carsi, which was how I initially expected Khan el-Khalili to be?

    Lucky me, I was wrong all along. While many souks, especially those close to Al Hussein Mosque, cater to tourists' insatiable appetite for trinkets and souvenirs, the inner souks, hidden behind medieval gates and known only to Khan el-Khalili regulars and adventurous tourists, are genuinely functioning markets where the trading of all things essential and not-so-essential had been going since the Medieval period. All does one need is a genuine sense of adventure and curiosity not to mention patience, in discovering these hidden nooks and crannies. A good camera also helps in capturing these priceless scenes.

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    shopping in khan el khalili

    by egyptiandiamond Updated Aug 7, 2006

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    thats me in elfishawy cafe  oct2005
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    The grand souk of Cairo since the 14th century, this market fills the streets that slope gently down from Midan El-Hussein. With sections devoted to a Gold Bazaar, a Spice Bazaar, and a Perfume Bazaar, anything you'd ever want to find can be bargained for here—and hard bargaining is Egypt's most popular non-contact sport. Even if you don't plan to shop, the swirl of commerce, scent of spices, and colors of 1,001 Arabian goods make the market one of Cairo's top sights and a photographer's dream. Try to venture a bit beyond Midan El-Hussein before buying, as the goods get less touristy and the sellers less devoted to fleecing foreigners the deeper you get. It's closed Sundays. and generally speaking khan el khalili is a very big shopping area for tourists to buy souvenirs such as the papyrus,the perfumes,and galabias and alot of other things,and ofcourse dont forget to go to ELFISHAWY CAFE and enjoy smoking Egyptian shisha,im sure u'll like it its amazing

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  • Diana75's Profile Photo

    Khan el-Khalili - Cairo's heart

    by Diana75 Updated Mar 8, 2006

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    Khan el-Khalili shop
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    Cairo's Bazaar, built in 1382, is a real quarter of small stores renown all over the world for gold and silver jewelry and copper decoration objects, but also for leather, perfumes and antiquities.

    A Cairo visit is not complete without a visit to the bazaar!

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    closest you'll come to experiencing biblical times

    by marigirl Written Oct 8, 2004

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    Sheesha (hooka) for sale

    Shopping here is a throw-back to everything you may have read about Jesus' time - the temples, the market places, the people, the beggers, the lame, the blind, you name it - families cluster around the three mosques in the middle of the bazaar, there are always people EVERYWHERE, and something is always going on. Men belly dancing (better than I can), kids playing soccer with a can, roasted corn, the call to prayer - this is how to experience Cairo.

    If shopping, ALWAYS haggle - there is a fixed price store on the second floor about two alleyways into the market - ask the locals. Otherwise, NEVER pay the first price quoted to you - wait until no one is around, act disinterested, walk away. If you really don't want it, you'll get it for dirt cheap. If they can tell you want it, they of course want more money. Acting skills are quite valuable, but don't be flat out fake - Egyptians are really good at reading sincerity. Good luck!! And learn how to count in Arabic - VERY helpful.

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  • freddie18's Profile Photo

    The Market for Egypt Lovers

    by freddie18 Updated Feb 14, 2009

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    Khan el-Khalili Market in Cairo
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    The souk (market) in the Old City of Cairo is the Khan el-Khalili. It was considered as a major tourist attraction in the city.

    We went there at night time and it was very crowded. I wonder how it look like during the day. Yes, you can purchase all kinds of souvenirs here. Most stores have small spaces that the seller has no place to stay inside. They just let customers to come in and choose their buy. When ready to pay, the seller go inside and collect the money. Very interesting way of running a business.

    I bought a lot of papyrus, Egyptian t-shirts, lamps, decorative magnets, and many others. I believe the price is right. The local sellers are mostly friendly. I did not encounter aggressive ones.
    You should include this in your itinerary. It is a good experience.

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  • MM212's Profile Photo

    Khan el Khalili

    by MM212 Updated Dec 16, 2009

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    Shops within Medieval Gates
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    Narrow streets, medieval arches, stalactite architecture, and fascinating merchandise characterise Khan el Khalili, Cairo's traditional bazaar, and provide everything one would expect from an exotic Middle Eastern bazaar. However, Khan el Khalili is significantly more touristic than other middle eastern souks (e.g. Aleppo), yet at the same time, the shopkeepers are friendly and less aggressive than some souks (e.g. Marrakech). Khan is in fact a misnomer, as the word means "caravanserai", rather than "bazaar". But Cairo's main market owes its name to the 14th century caravanserai which existed on the site and led to the development of the bazaar around it. Historically, Cairo was an important merchant town on the Silk Road and Khan el Khalili was where all the trade occurred. Today, this bazaar is an important stop on any visitor's itinerary, where the merchandise is quite interesting and better priced than other parts of Cairo. Silver, rugs, pottery, fabrics and much more can be found in these narrow alleys and shops. Take your time while walking around the market, and stop along the way to see some of nearby Islamic monuments too.

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  • trotador's Profile Photo

    KHAN EL KHALILI, GREAT ZOCO

    by trotador Written Dec 26, 2003

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    Khan El Khalili

    Everything in Egypt is great. Now is the turn to the Great Bazaar.
    I suggest to make a friend, a Egyptian friend, and go with him around the Khan El Khalili. Everything you are looking for he will be able to find it. The "friend" will get a comission of every of your pursaches. At the end give to him a tip.

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    3-Hussien & Khan El-Khalili.

    by siso010 Written Jul 18, 2005

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    This is the night life of Cairo.
    You will enjoy your stay in this ancient area tio drink something and to smoke shisha.
    its nice when you are seeing people are walking everywhere,all happy and excited.its very crowded really.
    The food in this area is very very very tasty I recommend you to try it.

    You will not only sit in a cafe and drink something but you will walk around to buy some souviners "or whatever the spelling" pharoanic or islamic stuff as this is the best place you can buy from.

    again and again the price is negotiatable and negotiatable.

    The actual fair price is 1/3 of what the seller said,for example if he said 100 pounds you tell him only 30 pounds if he didnt agree leave him away.

    .

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    Al Muski

    by illumina Updated Dec 7, 2008

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    This long street to the south of the main souk is still quite a touristy area, but the further west you walk along it, the more 'local' it becomes. It also becomes increasingly narrow and congested, but the sights and smells more than make up for it: traditional clothes cheek-by-jowl with leopard-print; beaten copper next to plastic. Spice stalls give out their warm, sweet aromas, with chilli peppers adding their distinctive scent.

    It's a wonderful place, and you'll find yourself returning over and over again - in 5 days we went there on three seperate occasions! I bought a light cotton scarf with some open-thread work at one of the stalls, and haggled him down to 15LE. It can be difficult to ignore the blatant guilt-tripping they use, since you know you come from a much wealthier country!

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  • peaceness98's Profile Photo

    Al Khalili Bazaar

    by peaceness98 Written Aug 11, 2004

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    Bazaar al khalili

    Big tourist spot, must-go
    Big Bazaar, will take a couple of hours to go through

    It started off as a Caravan market by a guy called Al Khalili in the 1300's

    You'll see:
    great coffee shops
    egyptian perfumes
    egyptian jewellery
    stinky tourists :)

    You must:
    Bargain bargain bargain
    Keep an eye on your money/pockets- this is a crowded spot and a haven for pickpockets
    expect to hear lots of noise

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    Not just a tourist trap

    by PierreZA Updated Oct 17, 2008

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    Around Khan El Kalili

    This lively souq dates back to the 1300's.
    Although it could be seen as a tourist trap, it is much more than that. If you take time to wander around you will find areas where many locals buy at this market.
    If you do want to spend money, haggle!haggle!haggle!
    What you can buy: brass items, leather, belly-dance outfits, prefume, spices etc.
    You will find coffee houses and the market is very lively at night, with a great atmosphere.
    A taxi from downtown should not be more tha 15 EPounds.

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